Field Trips or Collecting Tours

Field Trips or Collecting Tours

The duration of a field trip is not important, except that it should be long enough to give each member adequate time to collect in various available habitats. Organizing into groups of two, three or four members helps promote orderliness and safety consciousness. A leader can check with the captain of each group occasionally to see that everyone is present. Parents and other interested adults, youth leaders or entomol- ogy hobbyists can add much to a trip or tour.

The afternoon of a warm sunny day is an excellent time to collect insects. Moths and other insects that hide during the day can be collected best at night around lights. Nearby parks, farms, fields, ponds and streams are good places to visit for collecting if there is a variety of habitats. See Unit I project booklet for types of insect habitats. City parks are usually too small or too well kept for collecting many insects.

Before the groups disperse for collecting, older members can demonstrate how to use the collecting net, other ways to collect and where to collect. Encourage members to look for insects in the different available habitats. Tell them to make a mental note of the habitat in which they find the different insects they collect. Have a contest among the groups to see which one finds the greatest variety of insects and habitats.

At the next club meeting, have members report what they saw and learned on the field trip. Such discussions help members retain information about the many kinds of insects observed and make the results of the trip more valuable and memorable.