University of Kentucky Department of Entomology

Mystery Bug Answers

 
Mystery Picture #53

Mystery Picture #53

R. Bessin,
University of Kentucky
Entomology
R. Bessin,
University of Kentucky
Entomology
(Mystery Pictures)(Mystery Pictures)
NoviceExpert

Novice

This month's mystery was a real challenge! The jaws of this male Reddish-Brown Stag Beetle resemble antlers, hence its common name. Only the male has these enlarged mandibles--the female's head and mandibles are much smaller. The adults eat very little but the larvae feed on juices in rotting wood of maple, apple, oak, or other deciduous trees. They are found throughout the eastern United States and Canada in deciduous forests and nearby open spaces, and sometimes in city lots. The adults fly at night and are attracted to street lights. They hide during the day in rotting wood or damp soil.


Expert

The Rosy Maple Moth prefers to eat leaves of red and silver maples, although sometimes it can be found on box elder or oaks. In the midwest US, caterpillars of this species can be found in large colonies that will strip a host tree bare of leaves! The caterpillars are green with lighter green stripes, hence this moth's other common name: Greenstriped Mapleworm. To learn more about this beautiful moth, see EntFact 008 - Saturniid Moths. The description is near the bottom of the page.


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