University of Kentucky Department of Entomology

Mystery Bug Answers

 
Mystery Picture #61

Mystery Picture #61

R. Bessin, University of Kentucky
Entomology
R. Bessin, University of Kentucky
Entomology
(Mystery Pictures)(Mystery Pictures)
NoviceExpert

Novice

Stink Bugs are very common in weeds, gardens, and field crops. They are able to produce powerful scents from glands on the sides of their bodies. It is believed that stink bugs and their relatives produce these scents as a way to repel creatures that might try to eat them. The stink bug in the picture is called the Southern Green Stink Bug. This stink bug species is very large, and is sometimes a pest of crops. Although many stink bug species (including the Southern Green Stink Bug) eat plants, some stink bug species eat other insects.


Expert

Jumping spiders are very common, and often make their way into homes. As their name suggests, jumping spiders jump onto their prey to capture and eat them. A jumping spider can jump more than fifty times its body length! That would be equivalent to a six-foot man being able to jump 300 feet (100 yards)--that's a whole football field in a single bound! Wow!

These spiders are usually easy to identify: they have flat faces, big eyes, and they almost always move in very jerky fashion. Although these guys are cute, watch out! Some jumping spiders are known for their painful bites. Remember: even though most spiders are basically harmless to people, all spiders have poison fangs, and many of them can bite!

Jumping spiders are in the scientific spider family "Salticidae." There are lots of information and pictures of individual jumping species at the Salticidae Home page: http://spiders.arizona.edu/salticidae/salticidae.html


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