University of Kentucky Department of Entomology

Mystery Bug Answers

 
Mystery Picture #66

Mystery Picture #66

R. Bessin, University of Kentucky
Entomology
R. Bessin, University of Kentucky
Entomology
(Mystery Pictures)(Mystery Pictures)
NoviceExpert

Novice

Green June beetles, also called "June Bugs", are very common in Kentucky, especially in June (say, that must be why they're called June Beetles). They start life as fat, c-shaped grubs. Grubs are a type of beetle larvae that live underground and feed on grass roots. Because they like to eat so much grass, they can turn whole lawns brown. After the grubs spend a few months feeding, they turn into pupae. The adult beetles then emerge from the pupae a few weeks later. Adult June beetles cause problems as well, often eating the leaves of decorative trees and shrubs.

Even though they are a pest, Green June Beetles are nevertheless one of our more attractive beetles. Just try not to love them: they're so cute! Since they are nearly an inch long, they are also one of our largest beetles.

The June beetle is a member of the beetle family Scarabeidae. This is one of the largest families of beetles, containing many fascinating species. Learn more about scarab beetles at: http://www.naturalworlds.org/scarabaeidae/index.htm


Expert

Planthoppers are close relatives of several other kinds of "hoppers," including treehoppers, froghoppers, and leafhoppers. They are all members of the insect order Homoptera, a group that also includes the more familiar aphids and cicadas. Like other members of Homoptera, a planthopper's mouth is a long "tube" that is used for sucking plant juices. Although most of the planthoppers in Kentucky are camouflaged, some in other parts of the world have striking colors. Here's a picture of one from Vietnam: http://coombs.anu.edu.au/~vern/fletcher/insect.html


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This page is maintained by Pat Dillon, Department of Entomology, University of Kentucky. Please send questions or suggestions to: pdillon@uky.edu