Pasture Walk

Pulaski County, Kentucky

 

A look at grazing small grains, legume/small grain mixes, and corn.

 

Home | About the Pasture Walk  |  Contact Keenan Turner

 

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April 7, 2004

May 3, 2004

June 7, 2004

July 5, 2004

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1. White clover patches are becoming a smother crop in some of our pastures. It crowds out fescue, interseeded with red clover and it crowds out summer annuals such as sorghum-sudangrass.

 

2. Red clover in a three-year-old eastern gamagrass field.

 

3. Red clover in a fescue pasture.

 

 

4. Alfalfa in a six-year-old eastern gamagrass stand. Red clover is dying out after three years in establishment.
5. Fescues top grazed around a manure pile. Keenan says that a quick movement of cattle through the fescue pastures in the spring is a must if you are attempting the keep the fescue vegetative.

 

   

 

Click on each small picture to see a larger picture. Click on each small picture to see a larger picture.

About the Pasture Walk

This Pasture Walk was organized by Keenan Turner, Pulaski County Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Agent. The Pasture Walk involves visiting a farm and meeting with a farmer who is trying to maximize grazing and reduce the need for baling hay. Some of these practices are unconventional and some have not worked. This page is not a comprehensive overview of the trials and errors. It is merely an introduction into the topic. If you have questions regarding the Pasture Walk, please call or write Keenan Turner.

 

Contact Keenan Turner

 

Keenan Turner

County Extension Agent for Agriculture and Natural Resources

Pulaski County Office
(28 Parkway Dr.)
P.O. Box 720
Somerset, KY 42502-0720
Phone: (606) 679-6361  

Fax: (606) 679-6271

kturner@uky.edu

 

 

 

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Copyright 2003, University of Kentucky,

College of Agriculture

Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service

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Last Updated: 07/16/04.