Cardiac Rhythm Laboratory

Dr. Patwardhan's Greeting

The human studies facility allows for systems level physiology studies in adult volunteers to be conducted. This facility is fully equipped with instruments to conduct measurements of ECG, non-invasive continuous blood pressure, trans-cranial Doppler, capnography, pulse oximetry, respirometry, airflow measurements, impedance cardiography, and a tilt table is also available for research use. Polysomnography, also known as a sleep study, may be adequately performed with this equipment as well.

Dr. Patwardhan's Greeting

The animal facility is equipped with instrumentation that permits intra- and extracellular electrical recordings, a 256 channel data acquisition system, a 256 channel high speed analog switch, three high speed digital fluorescence based optical imaging devices for use at micro and macro scale, two Xenon arc light sources, vibration isolated workstations, computers for data acquisition, analysis and simulation, platforms for real-time implementation of developed algorithms using floating point DSP microprocessors. Two complete setups for micro-electrode recordings from isolated and perfused tissue are available. These setups include a total of four micro-electrodes, several pumps and heat exchangers, constant temperature baths, four micro-manipulators and two intracellular Axoclamp-2B microelectrode amplifiers along with a mechanical pipette puller.

Dr. Patwardhan's Greeting

Researchers also have access to several computers available for exclusive use by staff of the Cardiac Rhythm Laboratory. Various software suites are installed on these computers allowing for the most contemporary analysis techniques to be employed during investigations. Mathematical computation and analysis can be performed using MATLAB, FORTRAN and C++. CAD development and finite element analysis can be performed with SolidWorks. Laboratory instrumentation development and data acquisition can be accomplished with help from the LabView development suite from National Instruments. Several of these computers are equipped with A/D and D/A converters as well. The laboratory is equally suited for the development of electronics hardware.

Dr. Patwardhan's Greeting

Personnel who work in our laboratory typically have a Biomedical, Electrical, or Mechanical Engineering background. Examples of engineering tools that are frequently used in our research are application of real-time neural networks or adaptive signal processing, mathematical modeling, some degree of electronics hardware development such as TTL addressable interfaces, analog multiplexing, moderate speed analog switching, and custom program development utilizing real-time A/D and D/A conversion.