Name_________________________

FAM 390:INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH IN FAMILY STUDIEs

Fall 2001

MW 2:00-2:50 p.m.

FB 313

A.O’Malley, Ph.D.

Office:305a FunkhouserTel. 257-1648

Office Hours: MW 1:00-1:45 p.m.Fax 224-0379

R3:30-4:30 p.m.

Other Times by Appointmentaomall@uky.eduajomall@aol.com

COURSE DESCRIPTION

An introduction to research design, methodology, instrumentation, and data analysis with emphasis on a student’s ability to understand and critique research in human development and family relations.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students who complete this course successfully will be able to:

-Read and analyze/critique family science research reports.

-Identify, describe, and apply concepts related to the research process.

-Identify and discuss the ethical and professional responsibilities confronting

the family science researcher.

-Compare and contrast research with families to research with other social groups.

-Explain the interrelationship of theory, research, and professional practice with children and families.

-Point out the advantages and challenges associated with the research methods used

in family science.

TEXTBOOKS

Cozby, P.C. (2001). Methods in Behavioral Research. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield.

Greenstein, T.N. (2001). Methods of Family Research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 

COURSE WEB SITE

www.uky.edu/Classes/FAM/357

.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

1.Class attendance and participation:Attendance is an essential ingredient of class

participation and the learning process.Each student is expected to attend all class sessions and to participate in class discussions and exercises.

Religious Holidays: Students are entitled to an excused absence for the purpose of

observing major religious holidays. However, the instructor must be notified in

writing by the second week of class.

2.Reading as assigned throughout the semester.It is expected that students will have

completed assignments prior to each class session. This is essential since class

exercises will be based upon reading assignments.

3.Papers:Each student will analyze two family science research studies as reported in

refereed journals and will be prepared to discuss them during class sessions.

** ASSIGNMENTS WILL BE EXPLAINED DURING CLASS SESSIONS.IF

YOU MISS THE EXPLANATION FOR AN ASSIGNMENT DUE TO

ABSENCE, YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE TO GET THE INFORMATION FROM 

A CLASSMATE.

** ASSIGNMENTS MUST BE TYPED OR WORD PROCESSED AND 

PREPARED ACCORDING TO APA GUIDELINES.HANDWRITTEN/HAND 

PRINTED PAPERS WILL NOT BE READ BY THE INSTRUCTOR.

** Grades on late papers (except in cases of documented excused absences as defined 

in The Student Rights and Responsibilities handbook) will be reduced 2 points for

each day late.Papers must be turned in within the first five minutes of the class

session in order to be considered “on time”.

4.Exams:There will be three exams (covering reading assignments, class exercises,

and lecture material).Exams must be written with blue or black ink or sharpened

pencil in blue examination books.

Make-up exams will only be given in the case of documented excused absences (as

defined in the Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook).Make-up exams may

differ in format from exams given during regularly scheduled exam times.

EVALUATION OF STUDENT WORK

The final grade for the course will reflect class participation (class exercises and attendance are components of participation) as well as the scores earned on papers

and exams.

Points will be distributed as follows:

Exam 1…………………………………100 points

Exam 2…………………………………100

Exam 3…………………………………125

Class Participation……………………..50

Papers (2 @ 25 pts.)……………………50

Total……………………………………425

In order to earn a grade of “C” or better, all papers and exams must be completed.

Upon completion of all papers and exams, grades will be determined in the following manner:

383 – 425 = A

340 – 382 = B

298 – 339 = C

255 – 297 = D

0 – 254 = E

COURSE POLICIES

1. Reasonable accommodations

If you have a special need that may require an accommodation or assistance, please inform the instructor of that fact as soon as possible. 

2. Classroom Etiquette

-Arrive on time.If you are late, take a seat near the door.If there are no seats near the door, you may stand or sit on the floor.DO NOT walk in front of

classmates or the instructor once the session has begun.

-Remain present for the entire class period.Leaving class early (without permission) will be recorded as an absence. Notify the instructor (in advance) if you have to leave class early.

-DO NOT WEAR HATS AND CAPS in the classroom.

Classroom Etiquette cont’d.

-Turn pagers/cell phones off upon entering the classroom.

-No food is to be eaten during class sessions.

-Do not blow bubbles with your gum during class.

-Show respect for others by your speech, behavior, and body language.

3. Writing Skills

It is assumed that all students in this course can communicate effectively using standard written English.Assignments, in part, are designed to sharpen academic writing skills as well as to foster critical thinking/reflection related to the course content.Therefore, all out-of-class assignments will be evaluated for spelling, sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and organization of ideas.Writing mechanics are important!The Writing Lab in Young Library has been established to help students with writing skills.Use if you need help!

4. Academic Standards

All members of the academic community are expected to produce their own scholastic work.When using outside sources, students are to give credit for ideas and information taken from others.The minimum penalty for cheating and plagiarism is an “E” in the course.

TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE

(G –Greenstein text; C – Cozby text)

DATE   TOPIC  ASSIGNMENT

Aug. 22   Orientation to Course   Syllabus

Aug. 24Challenges Facing the Family ScientistG – Ch. 1

Aug. 27To Be AnnouncedTBA

Aug. 29Families and the Research ProcessTBA

Aug. 31-Sept. 7Theory, Research, and the ProfessionalC – Ch. 1

G – Ch.3, 4

(Sept. 3Academic Holiday)

Sept. 10-12   Developing The Research Project  C – Ch. 2, 4, App. A

Sept. 14Presenting Research ResultsG – Ch. 2

Sept. 17-19From Concepts to VariablesC – Ch. 5

Sept. 21Measurement of VariablesG – Ch. 5

Sept. 24Exam 1

Sept. 26-28   Sampling   C – P. 106-113

G – Ch. 8

Two Journal Articles

Oct. 1-3    Ethical Issues in Individual   C – Ch. 3; Append. A

and Family ResearchG – Ch. 13

Oct. 5Academic Holiday

Oct. 8-12Evaluation ResearchC – Ch. 8, 9, 10

Experimental ResearchG – Ch. 11; pp. 73-80

Oct. 15-17Quasi-Experimental, Single-C – Ch. 11

Subject, and Developmental

Research Design

(Oct. 15: Paper 1 due)

Oct. 19Exam 2

Oct. 22-24Survey ResearchC – Ch. 7

G – pp. 80-85

Oct. 26UK Interdisciplinary ConferenceTBA

Children and Families 2001

Oct. 29-Nov. 2Developing a QuestionnaireG – Ch. 9

Nov. 5Focus GroupsTBA

Nov. 7-9To Be AnnouncedTBA

Nov. 12-16Qualitative ResearchC – Ch. 6

G – Ch. 7

Nov. 19Use of Existing Data G – Ch. 12; pp. 91-95

Nov. 21   Library Day: Paper 2

Nov. 23Academic Holiday

Nov. 26-30   Analysis of Data  C – Ch. 12, 13, 14

Interpreting Research ResultsAppendix B, C

G – Ch. 10

Dec. 3-7   Preparing Grant Proposals  

(Dec. 3: Paper # 2 due)

Exam 3: Friday, December 14, 2:00 p.m.