Frequently Asked Questions

 

Should I Visit the Disability Resource Center During My Campus Tour?

Yes. The physical accessibility of a campus and the availability of academic accommodations are an important component of fully enriched college experience. These should be considered in the student's choice of colleges or universities. If you have questions or concerns regarding the provision of academic, housing or dining accommodations at the University of Kentucky, please feel free to contact the Disability Resource Center to schedule a conversation with a staff member. This meeting can a basic description of the accommodation process, the services available and address any major questions or students have regarding equal access to campus buildings, services and resources.

 

Where Can I Park When I Visit the Disability Resource Center?

The Center has two reserved spots for visitors in the parking lot adjacent to the Multidisciplinary Science Building. Should those be occupied, visitors can park in the Kentucky Clinic parking structure immediately behind the Multidisciplinary Science Building and visitors can be validated to pay at the patient rate.

 

When Should a New Student Register with the Disability Resource Center?

Students can register with the DRC any time they have been notified of their acceptance to the university. To begin the registration process please click here to be taken to the online intake form.

 

What are My Rights Regarding the Confidentiality of My Personal Information? 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children's education records.  Parents should understand that their rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18 or attends a postsecondary school at any age. Students to whom the rights have transferred are "eligible students."  FERPA gives parents and eligible students these basic rights:

  • The right to inspect and review the student's education records maintained by the school;

  • The right to request that a school amend the student’s education records;

  • The right to consent in writing to the disclosure of personally identifiable information from the student's education record, except under certain permitted situation; and

  • The right to file a complaint with the Family Policy Compliance Office (FPCO) regarding an alleged violation under FERPA.

For more information on FERPA as a student at the University of Kentucky, please visit the Registrar's FERPA information page.

 

What are the Federal Laws relevant to Equal Access in Higher Education?

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law on July 26, 1990, by President George H.W. Bush. The ADA is one of America's most comprehensive pieces of civil rights legislation that prohibits discrimination and guarantees that people with disabilities have the same opportunities as everyone else to participate in the mainstream of American life -- to enjoy employment opportunities, to purchase goods and services, and to participate in State and local government programs and services. Modeled after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin – and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 -- the ADA is an "equal opportunity" law for people with disabilities (ADA.gov).

To be protected by the ADA, one must have a disability, which is defined by the ADA as a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, a person who has a history or record of such an impairment, or a person who is perceived by others as having such an impairment. The ADA does not specifically name all of the impairments that are covered." Please visit the website for more information on the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights has also developed a guidebook: "Students with Disabilities: Preparing for Postsecondary Education: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities." It provides excellent background information regarding the rights and responsibilities of post-secondary students with disabilities. The document can be found here.

 

Where Can I Find Information Related to On Campus Accommodated Parking?

Students can apply for Disability Permits through Parking and Transportation Services. To access the application, go to http://www.uky.edu/pts/sites/www.uky.edu.pts/files/pdfs/parking_permit_application_disabled.pdf.  For more information on Disability Parking Permits please visit the designated PTS page.

For general parking and transportation information, go to the PTS home page at http://www.uky.edu/pts/.

 

How Can I Obtain Accommodations for My Disability in University Housing?

In its efforts to provide a rich cultural experience for all students, UK Housing offers students equal access through appropriate housing accommodations. Some examples of these disability related accommodations:

  • Wheelchair Accessible Room
  • Access to a private room (suite style)
  • Presence of Assistance Animal
  • Access to Personal Care Attendant
  • Suite space free of applicable food allergen.

Students whose disability or condition requires an accommodation to have equal access to on campus housing, please complete the Online Intake and include documentation of a disability or condition related to the housing accommodation request. A DRC staff person will contact the student to determine the appropriate accommodation(s), which will then be forwarded to UK Housing. DRC Students receiving disability related housing accommodations are still required to complete the UK Housing application by the timelines specified by the website. To increase the likelihood that UK Housing is able to provide the accommodation, it is highly recommended the student get their housing accommodations in place early in the housing request process. If you have any other questions regarding the housing accommodations process please contact Dr. David Beach. All non disability related housing questions should be directed to UK Housing.

 

What do I need to know regarding Service Animals & Service Animals in Training at UK?

Service animals are defined as dogs (and in some cases, miniature horses) that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA (www.ADA.gov).

Service animals in training are considered to be dogs or miniature horses that are being trained to perform a specific task or function for an individual with a disability.

While your animal is on campus you have the following responsibilities:

  • Maintain all required vaccinations.
  • Maintain control of the animal by leash, harness or tether, unless it interferes with the service performed by the animal.
  • Ensure the animal is well cared for at all times.
  • Properly contain and dispose of all animal waste in appropriate outside trash containers.

Failure to follow these guidelines may result in the requirement of the removal of the animal from campus buildings and residence halls. If this occurs, the student may appeal the decision through the campus EEO director.

Service animals are typically free to be on duty throughout the campus and all university facilities open to students, however the university may prohibit the use of service animals or animals in training due to health or safety reasons, where service animals may be in danger, or where their use may compromise the integrity of research or cause health issues.

UK personnel are not responsible to provide care or food for any service animal including, but not limited to, removing the animal during emergency evacuation for events such as a fire alarm. Emergency personnel will determine whether to remove the animal and may not be held responsible for the care, damage to, or loss of the animal. An individual with a disability may be charged for any damage caused by his or her Assistance Animal beyond reasonable wear and tear to the same extent that it charges other individuals for damages beyond reasonable wear and tear.

Further questions regarding service animals may be directed to Dr. David Beach.

 

What do I need to know regarding Emotional Support Animals (Comfort Animals) at UK?

An emotional support animal (ESA) is a companion animal which provides therapeutic benefit, such as alleviating or mitigating some symptoms of the disability, to an individual with a mental or psychiatric disability. Emotional support animals are typically dogs and cats, but may include other animals. To be afforded protection under United States federal law, a person must meet the federal definition of disability and must have a note from a physician or other medical professional stating that the person has that disability and that the emotional support animal provides a benefit for the individual with the disability. An animal does not need specific training to become an emotional support animal. In the U.S., federal protection against housing discrimination is afforded under two federal statutes: Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Federal Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988 (FHAA).

The University of Kentucky requires all emotional animals be registered through the Disability Resource Center prior to coming to campus. Unless specifically indicated in writing by the Disability Resource Center, emotional support animals are only permitted in the residence hall where the student resides. During theregistration process you will need to make an appointment with the DRC and provide an updated vaccination record for the animal, verification of your disability and a note from a qualified individual of the purpose and need of the emotional support animal. While not an exhaustive list, examples of "qualified individuals" include treating physicians, psychologists, psychiatrists and licensed counselors.

UK personnel are not responsible to provide care or food for any emotional support animal including, but not limited to, removing the animal during emergency evacuation for events such as a fire alarm. Emergency personnel will determine whether to remove the animal and may not be held responsible for the care, damage to, or loss of the animal.

While your animal is on campus you have the following responsibilities:

  • Maintain all required vaccinations.
  • Maintain control of the animal by leash, harness or tether, or properly contained in an appropriate container any time the animal is outside of your room or common area of the suite style rooms.
  • Ensure the animal is well cared for at all times.
  • Emotional support animals may not be taken into study rooms, laundry facilities, dining halls or other buildings on campus.
  • Work cooperatively with Residence Life staff to resolve issues that might arise due to the presence of the animal.
  • Live animals cannot be brought on campus to be fed to emotional support animals.
  • Properly contain and dispose of all animal waste in appropriate outside trash containers.

Failure to follow these guidelines may result in the requirement of the removal of the animal from the residence hall. An individual with a disability may be charged for any damage caused by his or her Assistance Animal beyond reasonable wear and tear to the same extent that it charges other individuals for damages beyond reasonable wear and tear. If either of these events occur, the student may appeal the decision through the Office of Institutional Equity and Equal Opportunity.