Graduate School Bulletin - Spring 2005

GERONTOLOGY

The Ph.D. program in Gerontology is a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research-oriented degree specifically focused on aging and health. The program, based in the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, is organized in a way that combines expertise, methodologies and facilities from more than 20 departments ranging from the biomedical sciences, through the social and behavioral sciences, to the humanities.

Admission Requirements

The Ph.D. Program in Gerontology encourages applications from individuals having expressed interests in advanced theoretical and research-based studies of aging processes or aged individuals and populations. Complete applications that will be considered for admission to the Gerontology Program must include:

Required Elements Sent to the Graduate School

• Application Form and fee payment,

• Official transcripts of all colleges and universities attended,

• Official report of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

• (International Students) Official TOEFL report

Additional Elements Sent to the Gerontology Program

• At least three (3) letters of reference,

• Personal statement of interests, doctoral study plans, and career goals.

Students are encouraged to submit samples of scholarly writing, and are strongly encouraged to visit the program before admission decisions are made.

All complete applications will be evaluated not only for evidence of strong academic accomplishment and high professional standards, but for evidence of a strong potential for success in advanced graduate studies and careers in gerontology-related fields.

Degree Requirements

The goal of the Ph.D. program is to provide advanced multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research training in gerontology with an emphasis on aging and health. Students will develop an understanding of the full spectrum of topics that concern both the process of aging and the health and well-being of the elderly population. In addition, students will develop in-depth knowledge in related disciplines or areas of specialization. The course of study is flexible, stressing a multidisciplinary approach to the selection of course work and research activities. Emphasis is placed on tailoring each student's program to meet the specific needs of the individual's background and career goals.

To fulfill these objectives, the program integrates formal course work in gerontology, specialized training in a related domain, opportunities for research, experiential learning modules and a problem focused research seminar. Graduates of the program will be able to conduct aging-related research, teach gerontology at the university level, direct gerontology educational programs, work in the aging services field, and consult with other professionals on various issues pertaining to aging and health.

Approximately 40 faculty from departments throughout the University are involved in the program's instruction and research activities. Departments represented include: Anatomy and Neurobiology, Anthropology, Behavioral Science, Civil Engineering, Dentistry, Family Studies, Geography, Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Management, Neurology, Nursing, Nutrition and Food Science, Philosophy, Physiology and Biophysics, Preventive Medicine, Psychology, Social Work, and Sociology. The diversity of the faculty facilitates the comprehensive study of aging and the aged. At the same time it allows for concentration in several areas of particular expertise and program specialization, including: rural aging, long-term care, cognitive and sensory change, public policy, ethical issues, and the etiology and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, strokes, and other diseases prevalent among the elderly.

The Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, a Commonwealth Center of Excellence, offers a broad base of programmatic support for the program as well as serving as the home of a Geriatric Education Center, an Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, and a Stroke Center. Numerous sites for clinical/experiential training are available at various clinics, agencies and organizations, including but not limited to: The Kentucky Division of Aging Services, the University of Kentucky Hospital, Christian Health Center (a University-affiliated nursing home), Helping Hand Alzheimer's Day Care Program, University of Kentucky Geriatric Support Services, University of Kentucky Memory Disorders Clinic, University of Kentucky Center for Rural Health, the Center for Creative Living, Cardinal Hill Hospital, St. Claire Medical Center, Northeast Area Health Education Center and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Further information may be obtained by writing to:

Graham D. Rowles, Ph.D., Director of Graduate Studies

Ph.D. Program in Gerontology

101 Sanders-Brown Center on Aging

University of Kentucky

Lexington, KY 40536-0230

Ph.D. Requirements

Students are required to complete the core curriculum in gerontology and 18 hours in an area of specialization. Elective courses to be taken will be recommended by each student's Advisory Committee.

Core Curriculum

GRN 600 A Study of the Older Person (3)
GRN 620 Human Aging and Adjustment (6)
GRN 650 Research Methods in Gerontology (3)
GRN 780 Applied Research Practicum I (1)
GRN 781 Applied Research Practicum II (1)
GRN 782 Women's Health and Aging (3)
GRN 785 Independent Research in Gerontology (3)
GRN 790 Integrative Research Seminar I (3)
GRN 791 Integrative Research Seminar II (3)

Six hours to be selected from:

GRN 612 Biology of Aging (3)
GRN 710 Aging of the Nervous System (3)
BSC 770 Psychosocial Issues in Health and Aging (3)
GRN 610 Aging and Biomedical Ethics (3)
ANT 539 Aging in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3)
GRN 585 Aging and Environment (3)
GRN 715 Health Policy and Aging (3)

It is assumed that students entering with M.S. or M.A. degrees will have taken some of the required courses or their equivalent. The student's Advisory Committee, in conjunction with the Program Steering Committee, will determine the amount of prior course work to be credited toward specific requirements.

Possible elective courses that may be selected by the student or required by the student's Advisory Committee include but are not limited to those listed below:

Gerontology Electives

GRN 513 Geriatric Pharmacy (3)
BSC 779 Behavioral Factors in Death and Dying (3)
NFS 680 Nutrition and Aging (2)
AHE 510 Older Women and their Health (3)
HA 510 Organization of the Long-term Care Sector (3)
SOC 735 Special Topics in Work, Gender and Inequality:
Gender and Aging (3)
SW 604 Social Work Practice with the Aging (2)
SW 613 Uban Ecology and Aging (2-3)
SW 642 Psychological Aspects of Human Aging (3)

GRADUATE COURSES

GRN 513 GERIATRIC PHARMACY (SAME AS PHR 813) (3)

GRN 585 AGING AND ENVIRONMENT (SAME AS FAM 585/GEO 585) (3)

GRN 600 A STUDY OF THE OLDER PERSON (3)

GRN 610 AGING AND BIOMEDICAL ETHICS (3)

GRN 612 BIOLOGY OF AGING (SAME AS BIO/ANA/PGY 612) (3)

GRN 615 SEMINAR IN TEACHING MEDICAL SCIENCE (MED SCIENCE TEACHING I)(SAME AS PGY 615) (2)

GRN 620 HUMAN AGING AND ADJUSTMENT (6)

GRN 643 BIOMEDICAL ASPECTS OF AGING (SAME AS SW 643) (3)

GRN 650 RESEARCH METHODS IN GERONTOLOGY (3)

GRN 660 AGING AND FAMILY VALUES (SAME AS FAM 660) (3)

GRN 710 AGING OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM (SAME AS PHA/PGY/ANA 710) (3)

GRN 715 HEALTH POLICY AND AGING (SAME AS HA 715) (3)

GRN 749 DISSERTATION RESEARCH (0)

GRN 769 RESIDENCE CREDIT FOR THE DOCTOR'S DEGREE (0-12)

GRN 770 SPECIAL TOPICS IN GERONTOLOGY (1-3)

GRN 780 APPLIED RESEARCH PRACTICUM I (1)

GRN 781 APPLIED RESEARCH PRACTICUM II (1)

GRN 782 WOMEN'S HEALTH AND AGING (SAME AS BSC 782) (3)

GRN 785 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN GERONTOLOGY (3)

GRN 790 INTEGRATIVE RESEARCH SEMINAR I (1)

GRN 791 INTEGRATIVE RESEARCH SEMINAR II (1)

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