Graduate School Bulletin - Spring 2005

MINING ENGINEERING

The programs leading to the degrees of Master of Science in Mining Engineering, Master of Mining Engineering, and Doctor of Philosophy are offered through the Department of Mining Engineering. The objectives of these programs are to provide an advanced level of applied science for use in the mining industry and to offer specified topics for research specialization.

The Master of Mining Engineering is a professionally-oriented degree intended for the student who wishes to add topics to a basic baccalaureate degree for use in a working career. It is also appropriate for the returning adult student who needs more subject matter for career betterment. The Master of Science in Mining Engineering is a research-oriented degree appropriate for a career in problem solving, research, or technology development. The Doctor of Philosophy is the terminal degree in the subject and is normally required for a career in teaching and research.

The Master of Mining Engineering requires 30 credits of course work capped by a professional paper that reports on a current topic of scientific or technical interest, quite possibly connected to the student's career interests. For the Master of Science in Mining Engineering, 24 credit hours of course work plus an acceptable thesis (Plan A) or 30 credits of course work and a report on one or more research topics (Plan B) are required to fulfill program requirements. Plan B Master of Science degrees will be reserved normally for students who have already demonstrated their ability to conduct and report on independent research.

Admission Requirements

Enrollment in either master's degree program is open to qualified applicants with an undergraduate degree in mining engineering or other engineering and science fields. A grade point average of 2.8/4.0 is normally required on all undergraduate work. Persons with undergraduate degrees in fields other than mining engineering are required to make up deficiencies in undergraduate mining engineering courses.

Applicants for admission must have a combined score on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) in excess of 1,000. Scores on the analytical portion are also considered. Foreign applicants whose native language is other than English must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and score at least 550 before they can be admitted.

In addition to satisfying general Graduate School and College of Engineering admissions requirements, applicants for admission to the M.Min.E., M.S. in Min.E., and Ph.D. degree programs in mining engineering must have been awarded the Bachelor of Science degree prior to admission to the graduate degree status. Normally, it is expected that applicants will have graduated from an engineering program accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). For applicants from non-U.S. universities, from related but non-engineering disciplines, and from institutions that do not have accredited engineering programs, an assessment will be made of the comparability of educational background to that prescribed and appropriate remedial course work established as a provision for admission.

The Ph.D. degree has no formal course requirement. Generally, students take a number of courses to prepare for the qualifying examinations and usually need to spend two years to complete a suitable dissertation. Most students find it necessary to take course work beyond the master's degree as necessary preparation for the qualifying examination. There is a language requirement for the Ph.D.

Current research areas include the following: rock mechanics and ground control, operations research, mine ventilation, underground construction, surface mining and reclamation, mine environmental engineering, mine power systems, coal preparation, and mineral economics. In addition to the graduate courses in mining engineering, graduate courses in civil engineering and other disciplines may be used to satisfy degree requirements providing they are appropriate to the student's program of study.

Additional information about the graduate program in mining engineering can be obtained by writing the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Mining Engineering.

GRADUATE COURSES

MNG 511 MINE POWER SYSTEM DESIGN (3)

MNG 551 ROCK MECHANICS (4)

MNG 561 MINE CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING I (3)

MNG 563 SIMULATION OF MINE PRODUCTION SYSTEMS (SAME AS MFS 563) (3)

MNG 572 ADVANCED COAL PREPARATION (3)

MNG 575 COAL PREPARATION DESIGN (3)

MNG 580 MINERAL PROCESSING PLANT DESIGN (3)

MNG 581 GEOSTATISTICS (3)

MNG 591 MINE DESIGN PROJECT I (1)

MNG 592 MINE DESIGN PROJECT II (3)

MNG 599 TOPIC IN MINING ENGINEERING (2-3)

MNG 611 MINE POWER SYSTEM PROTECTION (3)

MNG 637 ROCK SLOPE STABILITY AND DESIGN (3)

MNG 661 MINE CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING II (3)

MNG 681 GEOSTATISTICS II (3)

MNG 690 ADVANCED MINERAL BENEFICIATION ENGINEERING (3)

MNG 691 SIMULATION OF MINERAL PROCESSING CIRCUITS (3)

MNG 699 TOPICS IN MINING ENGINEERING (SUBTITLE REQUIRED) (3)

MNG 748 MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH (0)

MNG 749 DISSERTATION RESEARCH (0)

MNG 768 RESIDENCE CREDIT FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE (1-6)

MNG 769 RESIDENT CREDIT FOR DOCTOR'S DEGREE (0-12)

MNG 771 SEMINAR IN MINING ENGINEERING (1)

MNG 780 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MINING ENGINEERING (1-6)

MNG 790 SPECIAL RESEARCH PROBLEMS IN MINING ENGINEERING (1-9)

EGR 537 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (SAME AS CS/MA 537) (3)

EGR 599 TOPICS IN ENGINEERING (SUBTITLE REQUIRED) (1-3)

EGR 611 BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHODS IN ENGINEERING (SAME AS ME 611) (3)

EGR 621 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS IN ENGINEERING (3)

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