ADVANCED DEGREES


GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL MASTER'S DEGREES
(See also General Regulations)

On-Campus Residence

There is no Graduate School-wide sustained residence requirement for master's degrees at the University of Kentucky. However, students are advised to consult the special statement of requirements for the programs in which they are interested and consider carefully the statement about the spirit of resident graduate work in the section on residence. Students who contemplate continuing in a doctoral program should take into account at the outset the residence requirements for the doctoral degree.

Foreign Language Requirements

Many programs require a reading knowledge of a modern foreign language for the master's degree. French, German, or Russian are the normally accepted languages. However, another modern language pertinent to the student's program may be substituted on the recommendation of the adviser and with the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Dean. The language requirement may be satisfied by:

  1. Completing one of the accelerated graduate level language courses with a B or better grade.
  2. Completing the Educational Testing Service examination with a minimum score of 450.
  3. Completing the fourth semester of a foreign language with a grade of B or better as an undergraduate at an accredited college or university.
  4. Completing, with a grade of B or better, Special Examinations given for the graduate reading courses. Forms may be obtained from the Registrar's Office, Funkhouser Building. Other types of special examinations are scheduled in The Graduate School. Examinations to test out of Russian must be arranged through the Department of Russian.
  5. Transferring a language taken to satisfy the requirements for a master's degree at another university.

Note: With the approval of their program to use their native language, international students who are non-native speakers of English, may satisfy the foreign language requirement by presenting a TOEFL score of 550 or above.

Candidates for degrees must be proficient in English.

Transfer of Credits

With the approval of the student's adviser, or major professor, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Graduate Dean, a maximum of nine semester hours or twenty-five percent of the semester hours required for the degree concerned (exclusive of residence or thesis credit), whichever is greater, of regular graduate course credits, completed at an accredited university and earned prior to admission to a given graduate degree program, may be credited toward the minimum requirements of the Master's or Specialist degree in that graduate program provided that the grades earned were A or B. For example, such credits may be earned (1) as a student in another graduate program at the University of Kentucky, or (2) as a graduate student at another accredited graduate school. In the event a student offers credits in more than one of these categories, the total to be credited toward the degree still may not exceed nine hours or twenty-five percent of the semester hours required for the degree concerned (exclusive of residence or thesis credit), whichever is greater. In no case will independent work, research, thesis or dissertation credit completed as part of degree requirements for one program be considered to satisfy requirements of a subsequent master's program.

Courses and Curricula

Graduate students are eligible to take regular courses which meet as organized classes and independent-study or research courses in which each student carries on investigations independent of class meetings. Independent study or research courses must not duplicate thesis work; thesis work must be done in addition to the minimum course requirements. At least two-thirds of the minimum requirements for the master's degree must be in regular courses, and at least half of the minimum course requirements (excluding thesis, practicum, or internship credit) must be in courses numbered on the 600 or 700 level. Exceptions to this rule may be made only with the approval of the Graduate Council.

Concurrent Degree Programs

Concurrent enrollment for degree purposes in more than one graduate program is permitted only with the approval of the student's Graduate Adviser(s), Directors of Graduate Studies in the programs, and the Dean of The Graduate School. No more than nine hours of coursework may be common to concurrent degree programs.

Subsequent to the receipt of a doctoral degree, a student is not eligible to receive a master's degree based on the work which led to the doctorate.

Independent Study Programs
(Correspondence Courses)

No graduate credit is given for courses taken by correspondence.

Final Examination

Final examination (oral and/or written) is given to all candidates for master's degrees not later than eight days before the last day of classes of the semester in which the degree is to be awarded. The examination is scheduled by the Graduate Dean and the report is returned to the Dean upon completion of the examination, which in no case may be later than two weeks after the start of the examination. The examining committee consists of at least three qualified members recommended by the Director of Graduate Studies and appointed by the Dean of The Graduate School. At least one member must be a full member of the Graduate Faculty and one other must hold at least an associate appointment. The recommendation for a final examination must be filed with The Graduate School at least two weeks prior to the date of the examination. (Students writing theses should see Thesis/Non-Thesis Option.)

If the candidate fails the final examination, the committee may recommend to the Graduate Council the conditions under which a second examination may be administered. Insofar as it is practicable, the same examining committee gives this examination. In all decisions the majority opinion of the committee prevails. If the committee is evenly divided, the candidate fails. A third examination is not allowed.

Thesis/Non-Thesis Options

The Graduate Faculty authorizes all graduate programs to satisfy the master's requirements by either of two options, thesis (Plan A) or non-thesis, (Plan B). Candidates for the master's degree must have a major area (defined usually as an academic department) and must take at least two-thirds of the course work in this area; the other one-third may be taken in this area or in related graduate areas. In Education, Agriculture, Communications and Human Environmental Sciences only one-half of the work must be in the major area. When the setting up of major topics seems to require it, the Graduate Council may, on recommendation of the appropriate Director of Graduate Studies, authorize courses taught outside the major to count on the major.

Also, the Council of Higher Education requires that at least one-half of the minimum course requirements (excluding thesis, practicum, or internship credit) must be in the major or core area, with three-fourths of this at the 600-700 level. This is in addition to the requirements stated above.

The Thesis option (Plan A) requires a thesis to be developed under the direction of a member or associate member of the Graduate Faculty. Collaborative effort by two or more graduate students is not forbidden. However, there must be enough independent effort to enable each student to make a separate contribution and to prepare an individual thesis.

Theses must be in conformity with the instructions prepared by The Graduate School. For specific instructions regarding the format of theses, the student should obtain a copy of the leaflet, Instructions for the Preparation of Theses and Dissertations, from The Graduate School office.

Before the final examination, the thesis director and the appropriate Director of Graduate Studies must indicate to The Graduate School that the student's thesis satisfies all requirements of The Graduate School and is complete in content and format with the exception of pagination, and that the student is ready to be examined. Any modification in the thesis which the final examination committee specifies must be made before the degree is conferred.

The final copies are submitted to The Graduate School after the Director of Graduate Studies and the Thesis Director have signed that they are complete. The thesis in its final form must be received in the Graduate School within 60 days of the Final Examination.

Theses must be presented and accepted by The Graduate School by the last day of the semester if a student plans to graduate that semester.

Each student must pay a fee for the binding of the thesis. Payment will be made at the Billings and Collection office.

Theses submitted by candidates become the physical property of the University of Kentucky and authors agree that the University may decide the conditions under which they may be used or published. The University protects the authors' rights by placing certain restrictions upon borrowers' use of theses as long as they are unpublished. A copy of the following regulations (to be prepared by the student) is placed before the title page of every thesis:

Unpublished theses submitted for the master's and doctor's degrees and deposited in the University of Kentucky Library are as a rule open for inspection, but are to be used only with due regard to the rights of the authors. Bibliographical references may be noted, but quotations or summaries of parts may be published only with the permission of the author, and with the usual scholarly acknowledgments.

Extensive copying or publication of the thesis in whole or in part requires also the consent of the Dean of The Graduate School of the University of Kentucky.

A library which borrows this thesis for use by its patrons is expected to secure the signature of each user.

The non-thesis option (Plan B) requires that six or more graduate credit hours of course work be submitted in lieu of a thesis. A student may follow this option with approval of the program concerned.

Students should consult their adviser for any additional requirements that may have been set up for Plan B by their area of study.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL DOCTORAL DEGREES

Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

The Ph.D. degree is intended to represent the demonstration of independent and comprehensive scholarship in a specific field. Such scholarship must be manifested by both the student's mastery of subject matter and capacity to do research.

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is conferred upon a candidate who after completing graduate work devoted to study of a special field of knowledge (1) passes comprehensive examinations in the chosen field and the dissertation subject, (2) presents a satisfactory dissertation, and (3) shows evidence of scholarly attainment.

Students should note that some doctoral programs have degree requirements that may exceed the minimum requirements of the Graduate Faculty.

The Major Professor and Advisory Committee

Each student's program is guided by a Major Professor and Advisory Committee throughout the graduate career. Their purpose is to give continuity of direction and counsel and provide intellectual stimulation from the earliest days of residency through the completion of the doctorate.

The Director of Graduate Studies, or designee, serves as adviser to beginning graduate students until the Advisory Committee is appointed, normally not later than upon completion of 18 credit hours of graduate work. The Advisory Committee must be appointed at least one year prior to the Qualifying Examinations. The Major Professor and Advisory Committee are appointed by the Graduate Dean after consultation with the appropriate Director of Graduate Studies. The Dissertation Director, when selected, serves as the Major Professor. The Advisory Committee also provides advice to the student and specifically sets requirements (within applicable program, Graduate School, and University regulations) which the student must meet in pursuit of the doctorate.

The Advisory Committee has a core of five members. This core consists of the Major Professor as Chairman, two or three other members from the major area, and at least one representative from any minor area(s). At least one representative must be from outside the academic program (department). All members of the core must be members of the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kentucky and three (including the Major Professor) must possess full Graduate Faculty status. Additional faculty members may serve as members of the Advisory Committee. The core of the Advisory Committee must be kept at its full complement throughout the graduate career of the individual student. Thus, in the event of a vacancy on the Committee (occasioned by resignation, faculty leave, or inability to serve), an appropriate replacement must be made prior to the making of any committee decision.

All decisions of the Advisory Committee are by majority vote of its Graduate Faculty members. Advisory Committee decisions must be reported promptly to the appropriate Director of Graduate Studies who will be responsible for transmitting them to the Dean of The Graduate School.

In addition to advising and program planning, the Advisory Committee is also involved in the administration of the Qualifying Examination, the supervision of the preparation of the dissertation, and the administration of the Final Examination on the dissertation.

Major and Minor Subjects

Every applicant for the Ph.D. degree must select a major area of study. The major area is one in which the student's efforts are concentrated. Some programs also require one or more minor areas. Minor(s) must be approved by the student's Advisory Committee.

Residence Requirements

The purpose of a residence requirement is to encourage contact with the academic community in which doctoral students may become fully involved with colleagues, libraries, laboratories, on-going programs of research and inquiry, and experience the intellectual ferment which characterizes a university. Such experience is generally as important as formal class work in the process of intellectual development. While the residence requirements are, by necessity, given in terms of full or part-time enrollment, the intent of the requirement is to ensure that the student becomes fully involved in an essential part of scholarly life.

Requirements for the doctorate may be completed in three years of full-time graduate work or the equivalent in combined full-time and part-time study; however, more time may be required. (See Academic Load.) In unusual cases approval of a program of study involving less time may be secured from the Graduate Dean. It should be understood that scholarly accomplishment is the ultimate basis on which requirements are met, not semester hours completed or time spent in the program. On the recommendation of the Director of Graduate Studies and with the concurrence of the Graduate Dean, successful completion of a master's degree may be considered the equivalent of the first of the three years.

Subject to approval by the individual doctoral program (see Degree Requirements), students may fulfill the three-year doctoral residence requirements utilizing one of the three models listed below.

Model I. a) master's degree or eighteen (18) graduate hours at the University of Kentucky, or transfer of residence credit from an awarded master's at another accredited school; plus, b) two consecutive semesters enrolled full-time, i.e. nine (9) or more credits per semester (may include combined 4-week and 8-week summer sessions); c) enrollment for two consecutive full-time semesters of 769 after successfully passing the Qualifying Examinations.

Model II. a) master's degree or eighteen (18) graduate hours at the University of Kentucky, or transfer of residence credit from an awarded master's at another accredited school; plus, b) enrollment part-time (at least six (6) graduate credits per semester during three consecutive semesters); c) enrollment for two consecutive full-time semesters of 769 after successfully passing the Qualifying Examinations.

Model III. a) master's degree or eighteen (18) graduate hours at the University of Kentucky, or transfer of residence credit from an awarded master's at another accredited school; plus, b) accumulation of 24 graduate credits at the University of Kentucky (exclusive of short courses; no more than nine (9) of these 24 credits may be earned in summer sessions) during three consecutive academic or calendar years; c) enrollment for two consecutive full-time semesters of 769 after successfully passing the Qualifying Examinations.

Regardless of the model used to satisfy doctoral residence, all candidates (students who have satisfactorily completed their Qualifying Examinations) for the doctorate must complete two semesters of full-time dissertation study immediately following the Qualifying Examination. Normally this is accomplished by registering for nine hours of 769 (which is called Residence Credit) each semester and completed with a grade of S. With the written recommendation of a candidate's Advisory Committee and with the approval of the appropriate Director of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Dean, specified graduate course work may be taken in lieu of all or part of this residence credit (769) requirement. If a summer term is substituted for one of the semesters, three credits must be taken in the four-week session and a minimum of six credits in the eight-week session. The student need not be physically present on campus while enrolled for credit after the Qualifying Examination. While there is generally no formal class work attached to these credits, and in some cases the student may not be on the campus, full tuition costs are assessed in that students who are preparing their dissertations are utilizing University resources such as libraries, Computing Center, and Major Professors' and Committee members' time and energy.

Note: The semester during which the student takes the Qualifying Examination may be counted for credit for dissertation study only if the date of successful passage is within six weeks (three weeks for the eight-week summer session) of the first day of classes.

Candidates who have fulfilled the above requirements, but who have not yet defended the dissertation, are required to enroll for 769 or 749 (0 credit hours) each semester until the dissertation is completed and defended. Such registration enables the University to keep accurate records of degree candidates and facilitates rapid and accurate information processing. Some programs have additional residence requirements which must also be met.

It should be understood that the above represents the minimum requirements of The Graduate School. Some programs have additional requirements.

Exceptions to this normal pattern may be made with the approval of the Dean of The Graduate School upon the written recommendations of the student's Advisory Committee and the Director of Graduate Studies, which clearly demonstrates that the principle of residence is preserved.

Foreign Language Requirements

Some doctoral programs require a reading knowledge of one or more modern foreign languages for the doctorate. The language(s) normally accepted are French, German, or Russian. However, any modern foreign language more appropriate to the student's field of study may be selected on the recommendation of the Advisory Committee and with the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Dean. Arrangements must be made through the Office of the Graduate Dean for examinations in languages not regularly taught at the University of Kentucky.

Any language requirement(s) must be satisfied before the applicant may sit for the Qualifying Examination. (See Foreign Language Requirements.)  

The Qualifying Examination

A Qualifying Examination consisting of both written and oral components is required of all doctoral students. Its purpose is to verify that students have sufficient understanding of and competence in their fields to become candidates for the degree. In most programs an individual Qualifying Examination is prepared and administered by the Advisory Committee; in some cases that committee also judges the results of the examination. A majority vote of the core of the Advisory Committee is required for successful completion of the Qualifying Examination. Programs which give uniform, written Qualifying Examinations to all of their candidates shall have rules (filed with the Graduate Dean) governing the role of the Advisory Committee in the preparation, administration, and evaluation of the Qualifying Examination. The examination is given usually after four semesters of graduate work or the equivalent.

The Qualifying Examination must be scheduled through the Director of Graduate Studies and approved two weeks in advance by The Graduate School. Failure to meet this scheduling requirement may result in the student's not having proper University status and can cause omissions in records, loss of credits, or delay of graduation. Students should check with the Director of Graduate Studies to make sure that the Qualifying Examination has been appropriately scheduled.

The results of the examination must be reported by the Director of Graduate Studies to The Graduate School within 10 days of its conclusion. If the result is failure, the Committee determines the conditions to be met before another examination may be given. The minimum time between examinations is four months. A second examination must be taken within one year after taking the first examination. A third examination is not permitted.

The Dissertation

Each student must present a dissertation which represents the culmination of a major research project. The dissertation must be a well-reasoned, original contribution to knowledge in the field of study and should provide evidence of high scholarly achievement. The Major Professor is the primary source of guidance in the planning and preparation of the dissertation. However, other members of the Advisory Committee may be involved in the process as well. All core members of the Advisory Committee must read the dissertation prior to signing the Approval Form. It is the responsibility of the Advisory Committee to make suggestions for revisions before the Final Examination. A majority of the Advisory Committee core members must indicate that the form and substance of the dissertation are adequate to justify the scheduling of the Final Examination. The Final Examination on the dissertation may not be scheduled without the signatures of a majority of the Advisory Committee's members on the Approval Form.

The style and form of the dissertation must be in conformity with the instructions prepared by The Graduate School. For specific instructions regarding the format of the dissertation, the student should obtain a copy of the Instructions for the Preparation of Theses and Dissertations from The Graduate School Office.

Each graduating doctoral student will pay dissertation fees. Payment will be made at the University Billings and Collections Office. Authorization forms to pay dissertation fees are issued in Room 331, Patterson Office Tower.

Copyright

Dissertations may be copyrighted by the student by (1) signing the Copyright Authorization on the Microfilm Agreement Form which is completed after the dissertation format check in The Graduate School, (2) paying the copyright fee of $35 (this copyright fee is in addition to the $57 dissertation fee), and (3) including a copyright notice in the front of the dissertation. The notice is a single sheet on which is centered the heading.

Copyright by
(name of student)
(year)

The Final Examination

The Final Examination includes a defense of the dissertation and may be as comprehensive in the major and minor areas as the Advisory Committee chooses to make it. It is conducted by an expanded Advisory Committee chaired by the Director of Graduate Studies or someone designated by the Director. The Graduate Dean and President of the University are ex officio members of all final examination committees. The examination is a public event and its scheduling is published and announced beforehand. Any member of the University community may attend.

At least four weeks prior to the Final Examination, following notification by the Major Professor that the dissertation has been distributed to members of the Advisory Committee, the Director of Graduate Studies will advise The Graduate School of the intent to examine. At this time the Graduate Dean appoints an Outside Examiner as a core member of the Advisory Committee. The specific time and date of the examination must be designated by The Graduate School at least two weeks prior to the actual examination. All members of the Committee except the outside Examiner have had an opportunity to suggest revisions prior to signing the Dissertation Approval Form. Thus, most revisions should have been completed at an earlier time. The Final Examination must take place no later than eight days prior to the last day of classes of the semester in which the student expects to graduate. Final examinations are public events and must take place while the University is officially in session. They may not be scheduled during the periods between semesters or between the end of the Eight-Week Summer Session and the beginning of the Fall semester.

The Dissertation Approval Form, along with an acceptable copy of the dissertation, must be presented to The Graduate School at the time the Final Examination is established. The draft of the dissertation submitted must be complete in content, including all footnotes, tables, figures, and appendices. A full bibliography or set of references must be included as must a title page and abstract.

In all decisions, the majority opinion of the Graduate Faculty members of the Advisory Committee prevails. If the Advisory Committee is evenly divided, the candidate fails.

In the event of failure, the Advisory Committee recommends to the Graduate Dean conditions under which the candidate may be re-examined, if re-examination is deemed appropriate. When conditions set by the Graduate Dean have been met, the candidate may be re-examined. Should any vacancies on the Committee occur between the two examinations, the Graduate Dean shall appoint replacements. A third examination is not permitted.

After the Final Examination is passed, the final copy of the dissertation is prepared. Final copies are then submitted to The Graduate School along with the signatures of the Major Professor and the Director of Graduate Studies. The dissertation in its final form must be received in The Graduate School within 60 days of the Final Examination. If this deadline is not met, the candidate must undergo a second examination.

Doctor of Musical Arts

(See Doctor of Musical Arts.)

Doctor of Education

(See Doctor of Education as well as Graduate Work in the College of Education below)

Doctoral Programs With Other Universities

Joint doctoral programs in education are offered between the University of Kentucky and other state universities: Eastern, Morehead, Murray, and Western. These programs permit qualified candidates to complete approximately one year of graduate work above the master's degree at the cooperating university. A minimum of 18 credit hours of course work, the Qualifying Examination and the dissertation must be completed at the University of Kentucky, and a minimum of one academic year must be spent in full-time residence on the Lexington campus. The work of each candidate is directed by a joint faculty committee from both institutions.

Persons interested in these programs should confer with the Dean of The Graduate School at the cooperating university, or the appropriate Director of Graduate Studies in the College of Education at the University of Kentucky. Applications may be filed for review by a joint screening committee. Admission will depend upon academic standing, scores on standardized examinations, and personal references.

There are available cooperative programs in musicology, in physics, and in civil engineering between the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville and joint programs in biology and geology between the University of Kentucky and Eastern Kentucky University. Inquiries should be directed to the appropriate Director of Graduate Studies, University of Kentucky.

GRADUATE WORK IN THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

The College offers the following degrees: Master of Arts in Education, Master of Science in Education, Master of Science (in the Health, Physical Education and Recreation graduate program), Specialist in Education, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy. Graduate work is also provided for persons seeking Rank I or II classification.

Rank II classification may be achieved by the completion of a master's degree or the "Planned Fifth Year Program." The "Fifth Year" is a non-degree program of 32 semester hours for persons who hold bachelor's degrees and a teaching certificate. A minimum of 18 hours must be completed at the University of Kentucky. Of the 32 hours at least 12 must be in professional education, and at least 12 must be in fields outside education.

Specific requirements depend upon the type of certificate desired. Information about specific certification requirements can be obtained from the appropriate Director of Graduate Studies.

Rank I classification requires the completion of: (1) 30 hours of approved graduate level credit in addition to the requirements for a Rank II classification, or (2) 60 hours of approved graduate level credit including the master's degree.

Each student's graduate curriculum must be a well-rounded program of courses related to the student's major interest and approved by the adviser. In cases of deficient preparation the adviser, with the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies in the respective department, determines prerequisite undergraduate courses to be taken. Each department has designated one or more faculty members to direct graduate studies in that department. Specific questions regarding programs may be referred to the appropriate Directors of Graduate Studies.

The two plans which lead to the degree of Master of Arts in Education or Master of Science in Education are Plans A and B, described earlier under requirements for the M.A. and M.S. degrees.

Master of Arts in Education

The Master of Arts in Education is the program selected by candidates seeking initial or renewal certification for work in school settings.

A Master of Arts in Education degree will usually lead to Rank II for pay purposes.

The plan which leads to the degree of Master of Arts in Education for persons holding a provisional certificate is outlined below:

  1. All candidates for the Master of Arts in Education degree must meet the requirements for a valid teaching certificate, based on a four-year baccalaureate program. These requirements are outlined in the general catalog of the University. If deficiencies are found, they should be overcome before proceeding with graduate work. The work required to overcome these deficiencies is in addition to the minimum graduate requirements for the degree.
    1. A minimum of 24 semester hours of graduate work, with at least 12 semester hours in courses numbered 600 or higher, must be completed and a thesis presented, or
    2. A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate work, with at least 15 semester hours in courses numbered 600 or 700, must be completed.
  2. At least 12 semester hours of graduate work must be in Education.
  3. The total number of credits presented in Education, undergraduate and graduate, must be at least 30 semester hours.
  4. At least 12 semester hours must be outside the College of Education for both elementary and secondary teachers except for teachers of vocational agriculture who take six hours outside Education and Reading Specialists who take six to nine hours outside Education.
  5. Specific requirements depend upon the type of certificate desired. Information about specific certification requirements can be obtained from the appropriate Director of Graduate Studies.

The College of Education offers an option for secondary teachers from selected majors to meet requirements for initial teacher certification. This option may require additional courses. See the appropriate Director of Graduate Studies for more information regarding this option.

Master of Science in Education

The Master of Science in Education degree is normally awarded to students pursuing programs of study which do not lead to certification. However, if a student already holds a valid teaching certificate, the Master of Science in Education degree may give Rank II for pay purposes and may, under some circumstances, renew the certificate. The Master of Science in Education degree may also endorse a valid teaching certificate for another approved teaching subject or field.

The plan which leads to the degree of Master of Science in Education is outlined below:

    1. A minimum of 24 semester hours of graduate work, with at least 12 semester hours in courses numbered 600 or higher, must be completed and a thesis presented, or
    2. A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate work, with at least 15 semester hours in courses numbered 600 or 700, must be completed.
  1. A minimum of 12 semester hours of graduate work in the College of Education is required.
  2. A minimum of six hours outside the College of Education is required, but individual programs may require additional work outside the College.
  3. Specific requirements depend upon the type of certificate desired. Information about specific certification requirements can be obtained from the appropriate Director of Graduate Studies.

The College of Education offers an option for secondary teachers from selected majors to meet requirements for initial teacher certification. This option may require additional courses. See the appropriate Director of Graduate Studies for more information regarding this option.

Doctor of Education

The requirements for the Ed.D. correspond to those of the Ph.D. with the following differences:

  1. In addition to other credentials, admission requirements include:
    1. a master's degree, or,
    2. thirty (30) graduate credit hours in preparation of or applicable to an appropriate master's degree.
  2. Some program areas require successful teaching, clinical, or administrative experience for admission.
  3. The program requires completion of a major body of course work of at least 42 graduate credits beyond the minimum hours required for admission.
  4. Course work for the Ed.D. will be planned by the Advisory Committee to complement and extend previous graduate work. Therefore, the student's total doctoral and predoctoral graduate work will reflect competencies in the following areas:
    1. Area of Concentration: A significant concentration of course work designed to develop an in-depth knowledge in a specific area of Education.
    2. Support Areas: Course work to support the Area of Concentration shall include the following two components:
      1. Disciplinary support work from outside the Area of Concentration. Some or all of this work will be done outside the College of Education.
      2. Course work relevant to the development of competencies in the foundational studies in Education. Such course work to be taken in departments of the College of Education other than the Area of Concentration.
    3. Research Methodology: At least nine (9) credits of recent (within the 'time limit for degrees' policy of The Graduate School) course work selected to develop competencies in conceptualizing research, designing experiments, selecting appropriate methodology, processing and analyzing data, interpreting results, and arriving at conclusions.
  5. Although some students' programs may require competency in a foreign language as a research tool, there is no general language requirement.
  6. The core membership of the Advisory Committee for each Ed.D. student consists of members distributed as follows:
    1. The major professor and two other members from the Area of Concentration.
    2. Two members from areas other than the Area of Concentration; at least one of these from outside Education.
    3. Three members must be full members of the Graduate Faculty.
  7. In joint programs with the regional universities, three Advisory Committee members must be from the University of Kentucky and must be full members of the Graduate Faculty.

Joint Doctoral Programs in Education

Joint doctoral programs in education are offered between the University of Kentucky and the following state universities: Eastern, Morehead, Murray, and Western. These programs permit qualified candidates to complete approximately one year of graduate work above the master's degree at the cooperating university. A minimum of one academic year must be spent in full-time residence on the Lexington campus. The work of each candidate is directed by a joint faculty committee from both institutions. (See Number 7 above).

Students are encouraged to apply for the Joint Doctoral Program early in their master's degree program to facilitate transition into the doctoral program.

Persons interested in a Joint Doctoral Program should confer with the Dean of The Graduate School at the cooperating university, or the appropriate Director of Graduate Studies in Education at the University.

Doctor of Philosophy (Education)

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in the field of Education is offered in Educational and Counseling Psychology and in Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation (Higher Education).

Specialists in Education

The Specialist in Education degree is offered in Administration and Supervision, Educational and Counseling Psychology, and Special Education. It is conferred upon a candidate who satisfactorily completes a post-master's planned program in education under the general requirements of The Graduate School and the following special requirements:

Admission

The student, prior to admission to the program must (1) have a master's degree, (2) have a standing of 3.4 or higher on all graduate work, (3) meet the requirements for a teaching certificate or have credentials appropriate to the field of specialization, and (4) have at least 30 credit hours in courses in education (undergraduate and graduate).

The student should file an application with the Graduate School and the Director of Graduate Studies in the appropriate department and must be recommended by the major program and the department.

Program

The student must earn a minimum of 30 credit hours of graduate work beyond the master's degree, of which at least 15 must be in courses numbered 600 or above.

A departmental committee is responsible for helping students plan individual programs. The program should contribute to specialization in a field but should not neglect the broader development of the individual.

The student must complete an independent research project (equal to three but not to exceed six credit hours) and submit a written report, a copy of which is to be filed with the department directing the research.

With the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Dean, the student may transfer a maximum of nine credit hours of credit earned beyond the master's degree from an institution which is approved to offer work above the master's level.

Final Examination

The final examination required of all candidates is administered by an examining committee consisting of at least three qualified members recommended by the adviser and the Director of Graduate Studies and appointed by the Dean of The Graduate School.


DEGREES CONFERRED

Doctor of Philosophy
  • Agricultural Economics
  • Agricultural Engineering
  • Anatomy and Neurobiology
  • Animal Sciences
  • Anthropology
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Business Administration
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Civil Engineering
  • Communication
  • Computer Science
  • Crop Science
  • Economics
  • Educational and Counseling Psychology
  • Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation (Higher Education)
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Engineering Mechanics
  • English
  • Entomology
  • Geography
  • Geology
  • Gerontology
  • History
  • Mathematics
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Microbiology
  • Mining Engineering
  • Music
  • Nursing
  • Nutritional Sciences
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • Pharmacology
  • Philosophy
  • Physics and Astronomy
  • Physiology
  • Plant Pathology
  • Plant Physiology
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Public Administration
  • Sociology
  • Soil Science
  • Spanish
  • Statistics
  • Toxicology
  • Veterinary Science


Master of Arts
  • Anthropology
  • Art
  • Classical Languages
  • Communication
  • Diplomacy
  • Economics
  • English
  • French
  • Geography
  • German
  • History
  • Library Science
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Theatre Arts


Master of Science
  • Agricultural Economics
  • Animal Sciences
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Computer Science
  • Crop Science
  • Dentistry
  • Economics
  • Entomology
  • Geology
  • Kinesiology and Health Promotion
  • Mathematics
  • Nutrition and Food Science
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • Physics
  • Plant and Soil Science
  • Plant Pathology
  • Psychology
  • Statistics
  • Toxicology
  • Veterinary Science


Other Degrees
  • Doctor of Education
  • Doctor of Musical Arts
  • Master of Arts in Education
  • Master of Arts in Interior Design, Merchandising, and Textiles
  • Master of Business Administration
  • Master of Civil Engineering
  • Master of Engineering
  • Master of Fine Arts
  • Master of Health Administration
  • Master of Historic Preservation
  • Master of Mining Engineering
  • Master of Music
  • Master of Public Administration
  • Master of Rehabilitation Counseling
  • Master of Social Work
  • Master of Science in Accounting
  • Master of Science in Agriculture
  • Master of Science in Agricultural Engineering
  • Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering
  • Master of Science in Chemical Engineering
  • Master of Science in Civil Engineering
  • Master of Science in Clinical Nutrition
  • Master of Science in Communication Disorders
  • Master of Science in Education
  • Master of Science in Electrical Engineering
  • Master of Science in Engineering Mechanics
  • Master of Science in Family Studies
  • Master of Science in Forestry
  • Master of Science in Health Physics
  • Master of Science in Interior Design, Merchandising, and Textiles
  • Master of Science in Library Science
  • Master of Science in Manufacturing Systems Engineering
  • Master of Science in Materials Science and Engineering
  • Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering
  • Master of Science in Mining Engineering
  • Master of Science in Nursing
  • Master of Science in Physical Therapy
  • Master of Science in Public Health
  • Master of Science in Radiological Medical Physics
  • Specialist in Education




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