Important Dates

Web@UK - (tentative) October 25, Wednesday, 1:30-4PM, 106 McVey Hall
Register here

Web Publishers Meetings
South Campus
October 16, 2PM, location TBA
North Campus
October 17, 2PM, location TBA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Updates

Another clever use of 404 -
http://www.mc.uky.edu/medicine/nothere
A humorous explanation of the Internet (video) - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DClkE64nFDY

Accessibility Issues - Skipping Repetitive Navigation Menus

A most common problem found while running accessibility-checking applications on websites is not providing assistive devices a way to move past a website's repeated navigation and directly to the content.

You will most likely use this only for pages after the home page because the navigation is not yet repetitive.

  1. The tab index and keyboard shortcut are achieved by placing the following in the HTML of your pages somewhere prior to the first line of your page navigation -- <a href="#main"><img src="shim.gif" alt="Skip main navigation and go to main body of page."></a>. Shim.gif is a 1x1 transparent gif.
  1. Then place the following just prior to the first text of the content you want read -- <a name="main" id="main"></a>. This allows a text reader to skip over the repeated navigation and go directly to the content on the pages.

CSS 101

This monthly section is designed to help all of us move toward using cascading stylesheets (CSS) exclusively and confidently to separate the content portions of our sites from the design or layout portions.

Shamick Goworski of Ag Communications' Creative Applications for Learning Environments (CALE) Lab presented several compelling reasons in a mini-seminar created by Ivelin Denev, Becky Simmermacher, Craig Wood and Shamick. We greatly appreciate the time they've taken to bring all this together and share it with us.

They've made it available online at http://www.ca.uky.edu/CALE/CSS%5FPresent/. Be sure to click on the four bulleted links below the names to view changes to the page itself that reflect different uses of CSS. This site is a work in progress.


Web Policy Review

About The Policy (I., II., III.)

       I. Introduction

Creation and maintenance of Web pages and other Web materials at the University of Kentucky is governed by this policy, the Policy Governing Access to and use of University of Kentucky Computing Resources, the Graphic Standards Manual and the UK Hospital Policy on Management of Hospital Personal Computer Resources (PDF) as well as relevant laws and regulations.  Adoption of and authority for this policy is through the University's Web Advisory Committee (WAC).

People maintaining Web pages at UK should also be familiar with the Web Standards and Guidelines and the University of Kentucky Style Guide.

The University of Kentucky has the greatest respect for academic freedom and intellectual creativity. This policy statement is intended to support the academic freedom of the members of the University community, while protecting the interests of the University and all of its students, faculty and staff. It is designed to provide guidance to those who use University resources to publish materials electronically via the Internet and the World Wide Web. Individual units of the University that wish to create more detailed guidelines for Web materials may do so, as long as they do not conflict with this university-wide policy.

This policy is a revision to the previous Web Policy issued in January 1999. This new policy incorporates a number of policy changes issued through other means since that time as well as long-standing practices. This policy also replaces the 1998 UKCMC Web policy. UKCMC units are still required to use white backgrounds, no frames, the Master Navigation Bar on all pages, and the UKCMC footer on all pages as part of the design formats referenced in this policy. The WAC reserves the right to revise this policy in the future.

       II. Scope

This policy governs any electronic documents made available via standard Web protocols which represent an official unit or activity of the University, are hosted on University resources, or bear marks, logos, or symbols that might imply endorsement by the University regardless of where they are hosted.

       III. Definitions

The following terms are defined with specific meanings for the purposes of this policy.

    1. Accessibility

      The ease of presentation and utility to all users particularly understood to include those with disabilities. With regard to the University Web site, disabilities of note include blindness or limited vision, colorblindness, a wide range of disabilities which limit the use of a mouse or keyboard, hearing impairment, and others.

    2. Logo

      A name, symbol or trademark officially registered or adopted for identifying an organization and/or its products.

    3. Primary Unit

      A unit which reports to the President, the Provost, a vice president, a dean or a director.

    4. Site Review

      A specific series of evaluations conducted by University Public Relations to check that a Web site conforms to University policy and standards, does not violate copyright or other legal proscriptions, presents a professional and consistent appearance, functions properly, and is properly supported.

    5. Web Materials

      Electronic documents created for the purpose of displaying either on the World Wide Web or in a Web browser. These documents may be static or dynamically assembled at the time of request.

      1. Official Web Materials - Web Materials created by or for a unit or employee of the University carrying out the University's mission in teaching, research, service to the community, or administrative operations.
      2. Public Web Materials - Official Web Materials which are available to any segment of the general public (i.e., not internal Web materials).
      3. Internal Web Materials - Official Web Materials which are restricted by password or network/server security from being accessed by anyone outside of the campus community.
      4. Off Site Web Materials - Official Web Materials which are served from computers that do not belong to the University of Kentucky or its units.
      5. Hosted Web Materials - Web Materials created for an entity other than the University of Kentucky which are served from computers belonging to the University or its units.
      6. All Web Materials - All Official Web Materials as well as any other Web materials even if of a personal nature served from computers belonging to the University of Kentucky or its units.

Please see the Web Policy for further details


Notes from Campus

IE7 Release Candidate 1 (RC1) - Beware of Pitfalls

(NOTE: None of following directly effects the rendering of web pages. However, it does effect how users will set up the new browser, and that may effect how the view your web pages.)

Curious to know what Internet Explorer 7 will look like and how it will operate? Well, several colleagues advise NOT to install IE7 Release Candidate 1 (RC1) on the machine you use most just to find out. Install it on a spare instead.

Why? Because (among other things) it eliminates IE6, requires right-clicking to make Favorites folders open and permanently places some familiar icons to the right of the URL window without giving users (as in previous versions) the option to put them wherever they want. These are just the nuances I've noticed. You may find additional IE options that no longer work.

It’s important to also know that beta software might not behave the way you expect. IRIS's Adam Recktenwald explains. "We've done some tweaking that allows myUK to properly recognize several varieties of IE7 (beta / RC1, etc). SAP and/or IRIS can’t support beta software - this includes non-Production releases of IE7. Users are more than welcome to try it. However, they are at their own peril. SAP and Microsoft work closely together and once a production release of IE7 is available, SAP will shortly (within a few days usually) certify IE7 as a supported browser type."

In an article released 9/18/06 titled "Internet Explorer 7 looms — be prepared" by Woody Leonhard of the Windows Secrets newsletter, he states, "By the end of this year, Internet Explorer 7 will be "pushed" onto tens of millions of desktops. You'd better be ready."