Previous issues:


Important Dates

Web@UK
TBA, 1:30-4PM, 106 McVey Hall
Register here

Web Publishers Meeting
Nov. 17, Tuesday, 2PM, location TBA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONFERENCES

Usability Week 2009 Conference – Dec. 7-11 in San Francisco – www.nngroup.com/events/san_francisco/agenda.html
FETC (Florida Educators Technology Conference) – Jan. 12-15 in Orlando - www.fetc.org/
MacWorld Expo – Feb. 9-13 in San Francisco – www.macworldexpo.com/
In Control 2010 Orlando Web Design Workshop Conference – Feb. 22-23 in Orlando – 2010.incontrolconference.com/
EduRG Conference: Future of Education & Technology – Feb. 27-28 in Phoenix – www.edurg.com/events/
An Event Apart Seattle – April 5-7 in Seattle – www.aneventapart.com/2010/seattle/
WWW 2010 Conference – April 26-30 in Raleigh, NC – www2010.org/  


POWERS OF 10: TIME SCALES IN USER EXPERIENCE

It's hard to think about 5/100 of a second being a significant amount of time, but studies have found that "people can form basic visual impressions very quickly, at the limits of human perception." This is important for web designers and maintainers because we often face the task of grabbing someone's attention to our website, and we only have a short time to make an impression.

In an article by Jakob Nielsen, each significant power of 10 (1 and 10 seconds, 1 and 10 minutes, a day, a week, a month, a year, 10 years and 100 years) brings with it a "time scale in user experience."

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CSS FRAMEWORKS AND SEMANTIC CLASS NAMES

Using CSS frameworks and not liking the presentational names some of the templates give for parts of your HTML structure?

Kevin Yank of SitePoint newsletter empathizes with you and says "...the latest crop of CSS frameworks provide clever solutions to the problem of presentational class names" and "...let you write your style sheets with extra language features, and automatically compile them to standard CSS code when sending them to the browser."

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INSIDE THE GOOGLE NEWS ALGORITHM

Want to boost your departments news on the world's most used search engine? Or maybe find out why every effort so far has yielded less that stellar results?

The creator of Google News, Krishna Bharat, explains how the service's algorithm picks the topics and stories on its home page. While he didn't give away all his secrets, the Google principal scientist did outline to Computerworld's Sharon Machlis why certain articles get higher placement than others. They involve: volume and originality of content produced consistently about a topic; links around the Web; and what users do in response to links to that source on Google News.

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STREAMS, WALLS, AND FEEDS: DISTRIBUTING CONTENT THROUGH SOCIAL NETWORKS AND RSS

The Nielsen Norman Group has done yet another study concerning the best way to for businesses to get their messages through the current social networks without making a nuisance of themselves. For example, "Businesses that post too often crowd out the user's real friends and become unpopular (and thus risk being unfollowed)."

The study advises "(To) Start using a social networking service only if you have the budget to support reasonably frequent postings. And, if you later find out that you don't, close it down gracefully rather than letting it get overgrown by cobwebs.

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