KGS Navigation Bar, Search, Contact, KGS Home, UK Home University of Kentucky at http://www.uky.edu Kentucky Geological Survey at http://www.uky.edu/kgs Search KGS at http://www.uky.edu/KGS/search.html contact kgs at http://www.uky.edu/KGS/about/contact.htm KGS Home at http://www.uky.edu/KGS/ UK Home at http://www.uky.edu KGS Home

KGS Home > Earth Science Education
Quaternary-Pleistocene (6th) mass extinction?

Where Have All the Mammals Gone? L.M. Closs. Good summary of three theories for the disappearance of large mammals at the end of the Pleistocene. This site favors climatic causes.

Quaternary Faunas--Pleistocene Extinctions. Introduction to Quaternary Geology, University of Arizona. Online information from a class course. Scroll down the page to Pleistocene extinctions to see explanations of theories concerning the extinctions, as well as maps and graphs of megafaunal extinctions.

Ecological Role of Prehistoric Humans. J.D. Allan, University of Michigan. Short, text summary of the possible causes for the Pleistocene extinctions for a class on biologic diversity. Text includes summary of the climate change vs. human overhunting theory.

The Biology of Human-Caused Extinctions. Kent Holsinger, University of Conneticut. Good site for understanding the ways in which humans cause extinctions and possible consequences of these extinctions.

Evolution--The Current Mass Extinction. Public Broadcasting System. Good summary of the theory that the earth is in the midst of a mass extinction. Includes graph of human population, text explanations concerning man's impact on biodiversity.

Mass Extinction Underway. Hundreds of links to web sites concerned with the possibility of a Quaternary to current mass extinction, including a copy of a chapter from a book by Richard Leakey on the 6th extinction.

The Sixth Extinction. National Geographic. Online text from an article in National Geographic magazine in February 1999.

 

Return to Key to Earth Science Standards
Return to Key Earth Science Links-Alphabetical Topics List
Return to Earth Science Education Page
Return to Kentucky Geological Survey Home Page