Pennsylvanian-age shark fossils

Pe_edestus_1_thumb.jpg Edestus fossil "jaw," Henderson County. Found in dark shale above the Springfield (W. Ky. No. 9) coal bed, Carbondale Formation, in an underground mine. Department of Geological Sciences collection, 1448. The base of the fossil is really not a jaw, but rather the roots of the teeth.

Pe_edestus_1_det_thumb.jpg Detail of Edestus teeth, Henderson County. Note serrated teeth. Found in dark shale above the Springfield (W. Ky. No. 9) coal bed, Carbondale Formation, in an underground mine. Department of Geological Sciences collection, 1448.

Second Edestus fossil "jaw," found in 2002, in a dark shale above the Springfield (W. Ky. No. 9) coal in an underground mine, Muhlenberg County. The base of the fossil is really not a jaw, but rather the roots of the teeth. The lines are thought to represent the paths of teeth as the jaw (not fossilized because it was cartilage) grew and new teeth replaced old teeth. This is a different style of tooth replacement than is seen in modern sharks.

Detail of Edestus fossil jaw, showing serrated teeth and growth lines in jaw. The base of the fossil is really not a jaw, but rather the roots of the teeth.

Impression of the second Edestus fossil, Fossil was found in dark shale above the Springfield (W. Ky. No. 9) coal in an underground mine, Muhlenberg County. The lines are thought to represent the paths of teeth as the jaw (not fossilized because it was cartilage) grew and new teeth replaced old teeth. This is a different style of tooth replacement than is seen in modern sharks.

Detail of Edestus fossil impression, showing serrated teeth and growth lines in jaw. Found in dark shale above the Springfield (W. Ky. No. 9) coal in an underground mine, Muhlenberg County.

Hybodont? shark spine fragment, from shale in the Brush Creek marine zone interval, Greenup County. Note ornamentation on the outer edge of the spine. Found by Adrian Goettemoelle. Fossil is approximately two inches long.