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CONFIDENCE SLIPS AMONG KENTUCKY
BUSINESSES, SURVEY SHOWS

By Dan Adkins

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About 56 percent of the surveyed businesses foresee an increase in sales in 2001, compared with 69 percent who anticipated sales increases when they were surveyed last fall.

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Nov. 10, 2000 – (Lexington, Ky.) – Kentucky businesses are less optimistic about sales in the next year, suggesting the state’s economic growth rate may slow down, according to a survey by the University of Kentucky’s Center for Business and Economic Research.

About 56 percent of the surveyed businesses foresee an increase in sales in 2001, compared with 69 percent who anticipated sales increases when they were surveyed last fall, the Fall 2000 Kentucky Business Confidence Survey shows.  The survey also found that sales in 2000 had not reached last year’s expectations, increasing in only about 50 percent of the businesses.

“These figures suggest that the Kentucky economy’s growth rate could begin to slow,” according to the survey published in the Fall 2000 Kentucky Business and Economic Outlook.  The newsletter is published by the center, which is housed in the UK Gatton College of Business and Economics.

Kentucky businesses with more than 100 employees were more optimistic about the upcoming year.  More than 70 percent expect sales to rise, the survey shows.

Meanwhile, businesses located within the “urban triangle” – the counties between Cincinnati, Louisville and Lexington – reflect expectations similar to those of the entire state.  Nearly 59 percent expect sales to increase.  Among urban-triangle large businesses, nearly 70 percent anticipate higher sales.

The report was based on 341 responses from businesses across the state, with 141 of those coming from firms employing more than 100 people.

The Fall 2000 Kentucky Business and Economic Outlook  is available on the Web at gatton.uky.edu/cber/html/beo41.htm.


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