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PULITZER PRIZE-WINNING UK GRAD
TO DELIVER CREASON LECTURE TONIGHT

By Ralph Derickson

 

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Angelo B. Henderson is the 22nd African American to win the Pulitzer Prize since its inception in 1917.

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April 2, 2002 (Lexington, Ky.) -- Angelo B. Henderson, a 1985 University of Kentucky School of Journalism graduate who won a Pulitzer Prize for feature writing in 1999, will deliver the 2002 Joe Creason Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 2, in Memorial Hall on the UK campus. Henderson won the Pulitzer for a dramatic narrative detailing the lives affected by an attempted drugstore robbery that ended in the robber's death. He is the 22nd African American to win the Pulitzer since its inception in 1917.

The event is part of today's Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame activities.

The Creason Lecture, sponsored by the UK Journalism Alumni Association, is named for the late Joe Creason, a popular, folksy columnist with the The Courier- Journal for about three decades, and is supported by funds from the Bingham family, former owners of the Louisville newspaper.

Henderson is a special projects reporter with The Detroit News. Previously, he was a senior special writer for Page One of The Wall Street Journal.

He joined The Wall Street Journal's Detroit bureau in February 1995, reporting on the U.S. operations of all non-American automakers such as Toyota Motor Corp. and Honda Motor Co. Eighteen months after joining The Wall Street Journal staff, he began covering the Chrysler Corp., writing stories that ranged from the automotive showroom to the boardroom, including the attempted takeover of Chrysler by billionaire Kirk Kerkorian and United Auto Workers (UAW) labor talks. In June 1997, Henderson was promoted to deputy Detroit bureau chief where he managed reporters and wrote stories focusing on the global automotive industry.

At age 39, Henderson joined The Detroit News, a Gannett Co., Inc., newspaper, in December 2001. He continues to travel across the United States reporting stories on race, crime, culture and other issues that impact urban cities. He also can be heard weekday mornings every other week as co-host of the talk radio program "Inside Detroit" on WCHB-AM (1200).


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