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TWO UK STUDENTS RECEIVE
$30,000 TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIPS

By Kelley Bozeman


UK President Lee T. Todd Jr., center, with UK's latest Truman Scholars, Julie Murray, left, and Conley Chaney.

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"The Truman Scholarship is a very prestigious award given to only a handful of students nationwide each year. The competition is very fierce, and we are extremely proud of Julie and Conley."

-- Lee T. Todd Jr.,
president,
University of Kentucky

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Julie Murray


Conley Chaney

March 22, 2002 (Lexington, Ky.) -- Two University of Kentucky students have been selected as recipients of $30,000 Harry S. Truman Scholarships. Julie Murray of Charleston, W.Va., a junior in the College of Arts and Sciences, and Conley Chaney of Pine Knot, Ky., a junior in the College of Agriculture, were two of 64 recipients nationwide.

They were selected from among 590 candidates, nominated by 287 colleges and universities. They become the 9th and 10th Truman Scholars from UK.

Of the cash award, $3,000 is earmarked for their senior year and $27,000 for two to three years of graduate study.

Truman Scholars also receive priority admission and supplemental funding at some premier graduate institutions, leadership training, career and graduate school counseling, and special internship opportunities within the federal government.

"The Truman Scholarship is a very prestigious award given to only a handful of students nationwide each year. The competition is very fierce, and we are extremely proud of Julie and Conley," said UK President Lee T. Todd, Jr. "We had one Truman Scholar last year; having two in one year is a real hallmark. This brings our Truman total to eleven," Todd said.

Murray and Chaney will join the other scholarship recipients in May for a week-long leadership development program at William Jewell College in Liberty, Mo. They will receive their awards during a special ceremony at the Truman Library in Independence, Mo., on May 26.

Truman Scholarships are awarded on merit to junior-level students at four-year colleges and universities. These students have exceptional academic records, extensive backgrounds in public and community service, are committed to careers in government or elsewhere in public service, and have outstanding leadership potential and communication skills.

"I have assisted more that 40 preliminary applicants since 1993. The Truman application process is very competitive," said Penny M. Miller, associate professor and director of undergraduate studies in political science and the UK Truman Scholarship Faculty Representative.

"For the students it means $30,000 with which they can get their lives focused on doing well in their own intellectual development and doing well for the community. It is such a phenomenal opportunity to hone and develop leadership skills and to begin a national contact network with tomorrow's leaders," she added.

Murray, 20, has a topical major in public policy, and is the daughter of Michael and Bonnie Murray. She is a Singletary Scholar, Gaines Fellow and member of Alpha Gamma Delta. Murray plans to pursue a joint degree in law with a master's in public policy.

Chaney, 21, a public service and leadership major with a minor in political science and environmental studies, is the son of Phil and Judy Chaney. He is planning a career in environmental law and is a member of UK's Appalachian Student Union.

For more information on the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation, visit www.truman.gov.


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