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Gill Heart Institute Fights
the Most Common Cause of Death

By Jennifer Bonck

 

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Cardiovascular research is particularly important to Kentucky and surrounding states because people living in nine states in the Mississippi and Ohio River valleys have a higher risk of dying from coronary artery disease than people in the rest of the United States.

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Oct. 10, 2002 (Lexington, Ky.) -- Cardiovascular disease, which includes high blood pressure, atherosclerosis and stroke, is the most common cause of death in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of deaths related to heart complications continues to rise.

Physicians and researchers at the University of Kentucky Linda and Jack Gill Heart Institute are working to find ways to prevent and repair cardiovascular disease damage.

"The institute is dedicated to the mission of providing excellent cardiovascular care, educating cardiovascular professionals, and advancing knowledge of cardiovascular disease for the purpose of identification, treatment and prevention," said Alan Daugherty, Ph.D., professor of internal medicine and physiology and associate chair of medicine, UK College of Medicine.

Cardiovascular research is particularly important to Kentucky and surrounding states because people living in nine states in the Mississippi and Ohio River valleys have a higher risk of dying from coronary artery disease than people in the rest of the United States.

Active areas of cardiovascular research at the UK Chandler Medical Center include atherosclerosis (narrowing and hardening of the arteries), clinical trials of treatments for heart failure, and studies of devices for treating heart arrhythmias.

In support of regional research in cardiovascular disease and physiology, the UK Gill Heart Institute is hosting the fifth annual Cardiovascular Research Day on Nov. 1, 2002, at the Radisson Plaza Hotel in downtown Lexington. All faculty, fellows, graduate students and affiliated staff with interests in cardiovascular research are invited to present posters. Prizes of $750 and $250 will be given for the best poster presentations in the Staff, Fellow and Student categories. Deadline for abstract submission is Oct. 18.

Special events will include a lecture at 4:45 p.m. by the recipient of the 2002 Award for Outstanding Contributions to Cardiovascular Research, Eric J. Topol, M.D., provost and chief academic officer, Cleveland Clinic Heart Center, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, and professor of medicine, Cleveland Clinic Health Sciences Center, Ohio State University School of Medicine.

For more information, call (859) 323-3996.


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