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New Citizen’s Guide Explains Geologic Maps And Geologic Issues In Kentucky

Contact: Ralph Derickson

Image of cover of Geologic Maps and Geologic Issues in Kentucky: A Citizen’s Guide
(Click image to enlarge)

The citizen’s guide, which includes a free geologic map, is available from the KGS Public Information Center for $5 and may be ordered by calling (859) 257-3896 or toll free at 1-877-778-7827.

Image of inside of Geologic Maps and Geologic Issues in Kentucky: A Citizen’s Guide
(Click image to enlarge)

April 22, 2003 (Lexington, Ky.) -- Have you ever had problems with flooding or cracked foundations in your home? Have you ever wondered why the world-renowned thoroughbred horse farms are located in Central Kentucky?

Have you seen houses, buildings and cars buried in rubble from landslides and wondered why the landslides occurred? Would you like to know about the quality of the water from a domestic well on your farm? Do you need assistance in finding a suitable location to drill a domestic water well? The answers to these and other questions can be found by examining a geologic map.

To help answer these questions, the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) at the University of Kentucky has released a new publication “Geologic Maps and Geologic Issues in Kentucky: A Citizen’s Guide,” by Carol L. Ruthven, John D. Kiefer, Stephen F. Greb, and William M. Andrews Jr.

Geologic maps are used by many people for many different purposes. In fact, in the past 40 years, KGS has sold more than 150,000 geologic maps. The popularity of the maps reflects the fact that they are used to address such problems as landslides, sinkholes, flooding, groundwater supply and quality, and to assess the availability of energy and mineral resources such as coal, oil and gas, and industrial minerals.

The challenge is to explain how to use geologic map information in a way that everyone can understand. The newly released citizen’s guide has colorful illustrations and photos that complement a simple, easy-to-understand explanation of the uses of geologic map information.

In releasing the publication, KGS Director Jim Cobb said, “Our mission is to serve the citizens of the Commonwealth. We want to communicate what we do as geologists and explain how we can help and to do this in a way that everyone can understand and appreciate.” The citizen’s guide is specifically designed to achieve this. Cobb explained that geologists at KGS “want to share their enthusiasm and knowledge of the geology of Kentucky, to explain how geologic maps can help people understand such common problems as flooding, sinkholes, landslides, and water-quality concerns.”

The citizen’s guide, which includes a free geologic map, is available from the KGS Public Information Center for $5 and may be ordered by calling (859) 257-3896 or toll free at 1-877-778-7827. The publication is also available on the KGS Web site.


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