Campus News Banner


New Geologic Map Aids Jefferson County

Contact: Ralph Derickson

Image of the Geologic Map of the Louisville 30 x 60 Minute Quadrangle, Central Kentucky
Geologic Map of the Louisville 30 x 60 Minute Quadrangle, Central Kentucky

""

The map is useful for planning decisions related to urban and rural development, construction and transportation, water and resource management, land use, and mitigation of hazards (for example, floods, landslides, and slope instability).

""

 

August 20, 2003 (Lexington, Ky.) -- The Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), located at the University of Kentucky, has released its new “Geologic Map of the Louisville 30 x 60 Minute Quadrangle, Central Kentucky,” that should help those involved in planning in Louisville, Jefferson County, and surrounding counties. The new map was produced by KGS geologists Thomas Sparks and Qinhua Zhang.

“This new map has great scientific value because of the geologic information it contains, and great practical value because the data used to create the map are available in computer format,” KGS Director Jim Cobb said. Cobb will present the map to Louisville Metro Deputy Mayor Joan Riehm at the closing luncheon of the Kentucky 2003 Geologic Information Systems (GIS) conference in Louisville Wednesday, Aug. 20.

Representing a 1,443-square-mile area of Central Kentucky, the map illustrates all or parts of nine counties. This area has a population of more than 800,000 and includes the Louisville/Jefferson County Metro area and Shelbyville, Taylorsville, New Castle, La Grange, Mount Washington, Jeffersontown, Middletown, Prospect, and Smithfield. The map, the fourth in a new 1:100,000-scale series, provides a high degree of accuracy and detail, as well as a perspective on regional trends in geology.

The digital files used to create the map are available on CD-ROM for use in GIS and other software. The map has information about the location and specific mineral composition of different types of rock in the region.

The digital data sets make it possible to use this geologic information with other kinds of data – agricultural, archaeological, biological, engineering, geographical and medical – in GIS and other software. The map is useful for planning decisions related to urban and rural development, construction and transportation, water and resource management, land use, and mitigation of hazards (for example, floods, landslides, and slope instability).

The Louisville quadrangle map is available from the KGS Public Information Center for $8 and may be ordered by calling (859) 257-3896 or toll free at (877) 778-7827. The digital data sets are available individually or in groups on CD-ROM for $10 per 7.5-minute quadrangle. The CD-ROM includes a tutorial that explains the format of the data and other necessary information for their use. For more information, visit the KGS Web site.


Back to Campus News Homepage