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UK Launches Stroke Campaign

Contact: Jennifer M. Bonck

 

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“I see the devastation that stroke brings. I see how much suffering could be prevented if more people knew about stroke. Four out of five families are affected by stroke in America,”

-- Kevin Pearce, M.D.,
chair of Kentucky’s
“Ask Your Doctor” program.

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July 8, 2003 (Lexington, Ky.) -- It crosses all social, economic and gender barriers. It often hits people so quickly, there’s little time to react unless you recognize the symptoms. Every year 750,000 Americans suffer a stroke or brain attack. Remarkably, up to 80 percent of strokes are preventable.

National Stroke Association (NSA) is launching a national multi-year stroke education campaign in the Southeastern United States, also known as the “stroke belt” due to the number of stroke deaths in this region. This inaugural year’s theme is “Ask Your Doctor - Am I at Risk for Stroke?” NSA encourages doctors and patients to discuss stroke more often. Every year, stroke kills approximately 3,000 Kentuckians.

“I see the devastation that stroke brings. I see how much suffering could be prevented if more people knew about stroke. Four out of five families are affected by stroke in America,” said Kevin Pearce, M.D., associate professor and vice chair for academic affairs, Department of Family Practice and Community Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, and the chair of Kentucky’s “Ask Your Doctor” program.

NSA, in conjunction with the UK Chandler Medical Center, hosted a media opportunity today to announce the “Ask Your Doctor” campaign in Kentucky.

Pearce, and Creed Pettigrew, M.D., professor, UK Department of Neurology, and director of UK’s Stroke Program, discussed the details of the education campaign, as well as the latest in stroke research. Stroke survivors also shared their experiences.

The campaign is a national effort to increase communication between physicians and their patients regarding stroke prevention, treatment and recovery. The campaign will span three to five years with three goals: (1) increase communication between patients and doctors on stroke; (2) increase the identification and treatment of stroke; and (3) improve the management of stroke risk factors.

NSA is a leading independent national non-profit organization devoting its efforts and resources to stroke — including prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and support for stroke survivors and their families. For more information, contact the NSA at

1-800-STROKES or visit www.stroke.org.


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