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UK Taking Lead in Educating Doctors About Bioterrorism

By Jennifer Bonck

Photo of Dr. Frank Miller
Dr. Frank Miller

“UK had one of the first family practice programs in Kentucky,” he said. “This is just another example of UK leading the way in medical education. In the event of war or a bioterrorist threat, it will be essential for our family physicians to be ready and educated in diagnosis and treatment. Programs such as this ensure that readiness.”

-- Frank Miller, M.D., course organizer and professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, UK College of Medicine

 

March 14, 2003 (Lexington, Ky.) -- The University of Kentucky College of Medicine is educating current and future family medicine physicians about a relatively new, possible threat to their patients - bioterrorism.

The college recently held the 34th Annual Family Medicine Review in Lexington. Various topics, including clinical symptoms of bioterrorism agents and education in vaccines, were addressed by experts from UK, as well as other Kentucky universities. The week-long course consisted of seminars, lectures, workshops, exhibits and discussion panels. In addition to topics related to bioterrorism, the courses also presented information on other important subjects relevant to family medicine, including sessions on breast cancer, infertility, overactive bladder and prescription drug abuse, among others.

According to course organizer, Frank Miller, M.D., professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, UK College of Medicine, the addition of education in bioterrorism threats is both essential and innovative in medical education of family medicine physicians. “UK had one of the first family practice programs in Kentucky,” he said. “This is just another example of UK leading the way in medical education. In the event of war or a bioterrorist threat, it will be essential for our family physicians to be ready and educated in diagnosis and treatment. Programs such as this ensure that readiness.”


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