Campus News Banner


New Geologic Map of Northern Kentucky Will Help Transportation and Land-use Planning

By Ralph Derickson

Image of Geologic Map of the Falmouth, Madison, and Cincinnati 30 x 60 Minute Quadrangles, Northern Kentucky
(click map to enlarge)
Geologic Map of the Falmouth, Madison, and Cincinnati 30 x 60 Minute Quadrangles, Northern Kentucky

The map improves our knowledge of the location and specific mineral composition of different types of rock in the region, including limestone, sand and gravel. This knowledge is essential for the regional economy and can be used in construction and transportation planning. It also helps reduce or avoid hazards associated with landslides and slope instability. This is particularly important for a region that has one of the highest per capita financial losses from landslides in the nation.

 

March 27, 2003 (Lexington, Ky.) -- The Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), located at the University of Kentucky, has released “Geologic Map of the Falmouth, Madison, and Cincinnati 30 x 60 Minute Quadrangles, Northern Kentucky” by Thomas Sparks, Garland Dever and Warren Anderson. In announcing the map, KGS Director Jim Cobb said, “This new map will improve our understanding of the geology of one of the fastest-growing regions of the state.”

Representing a 2,087-square-mile area of northern Kentucky, the map illustrates all or parts of 15 counties that together have a population of about half a million people, including the cities and towns of Covington, Newport, Burlington, Williamstown, Falmouth, Carrollton, Owenton, Brooksville, Bedford, Warsaw, Mount Olivet, Florence, Fort Mitchell, Highland Heights, and Fort Thomas.

The map improves our knowledge of the location and specific mineral composition of different types of rock in the region, including limestone, sand and gravel. This knowledge is essential for the regional economy and can be used in construction and transportation planning. It also helps reduce or avoid hazards associated with landslides and slope instability. This is particularly important for a region that has one of the highest per capita financial losses from landslides in the nation.

The map reveals the geology of rock and mineral deposits from ancient glaciers that crept into northern Kentucky more than 120,000 years ago. Warren Anderson, one of the map’s authors, points out that “most of these deposits originally came from present-day southern Ohio and Indiana, but some came from as far away as the northeastern United States and Canada.”

The Falmouth-Madison-Cincinnati map was digitally compiled from 41 U.S. Geological Survey 7.5-minute geologic quadrangle maps that were originally published between 1969 and 1978 at a detailed scale of 1:24,000. The resulting intermediate 1:100,000-scale map is a new product that provides the same high degree of accuracy and detail as the original maps, in addition to a fresh perspective on regional trends in geology. It is the third map in the new 1:100,000-scale series of geologic maps published by KGS.

The digital files used to create this map are available from KGS as data sets on CD-ROM for use in geographic information systems (GIS) and other computer software. The digital data sets allow persons to use GIS to combine the geologic map data with other data for many purposes, including analysis of landslide and slope stability risks, and assessment of mineral resources such as limestone, sand and gravel. The digital data sets can also be used to create custom maps; they are ideal for land-use development and planning.

The Falmouth-Madison-Cincinnati quadrangle map is available from the KGS Public Information Center for $8 and may be ordered by calling (859) 257-3896 or toll free at (877) 778-7827. The digital data sets are available individually or in groups on CD-ROM for $10 per 7.5-minute quadrangle. The CD-ROM includes a tutorial that explains the format of the data and other necessary information for their use. For information about the digital mapping program, visit the KGS Web site.


Back to Campus News Homepage