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Six Journalists Named to
Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame

By Ralph Derickson

The ceremony will be held at the UK Hilary J. Boone Center on Rose Street. Later the same day, UK will host the 26th annual Joe Creason Lecture in Memorial Hall. This year’s Creason lecturer is Bob Edwards, host of National Public Radio’s (NPR) “Morning Edition.” Edwards, a Louisville native, also is one of the 2003 Hall of Fame inductees.

(Click on photos to enlarge)


Louise Hatmaker


Bob Edwards


Robert G. McGruder


Ed Ryan


Ed Staats


Carl West

March 5, 2003 (Lexington, Ky.) -- Six journalists who have been chosen for induction into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame will be honored at a luncheon April 8 at the University of Kentucky.

The ceremony will be held at the UK Hilary J. Boone Center on Rose Street. Later the same day, UK will host the 26th annual Joe Creason Lecture in Memorial Hall. This year’s Creason lecturer is Bob Edwards, host of National Public Radio’s (NPR) “Morning Edition.” Edwards, a Louisville native, also is one of the 2003 Hall of Fame inductees.

The Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame is housed in the Enoch Grehan Journalism Building on the UK campus. The new Hall of Fame inductees to be recognized at the luncheon sponsored by the UK Journalism and Telecommunications Alumni Association are:

  • Louise Hatmaker, former editor, publisher and owner of the Jackson Times and Beattyville Enterprise, was a pioneer woman journalist in Appalachia. Now retired, Hatmaker began her career as a reporter for the Hazard Herald and was a member of the Kentucky Press Association’s board of directors for 25 years.
  • Bob Edwards is host of NPR’s “Morning Edition,” the popular NPR morning newscast and entertainment program that reaches an estimated 13 million listeners each week. With NPR since 1974, Edwards conducts more than 800 interviews annually with political, entertainment, governmental and sports figures. He is a University of Louisville alumnus and has worked for radio stations in New Albany, Ind., and Washington, D.C.
  • Robert G. McGruder, also a Louisville native, was executive editor of the Detroit Free Press at the time of his death last April. McGruder, who spent his journalism career in Ohio and Michigan, was the first African-American reporter for the Cleveland Plain Dealer in 1963 and the first African-American president of the Associated Press Managing Editors. At the Plain Dealer, McGruder was also city editor and managing editor.
  • The late Ed Ryan, chief of the Louisville Courier-Journal’s bureaus in Washington, D.C., and Frankfort, was a popular columnist and political editor for the Kentucky newspaper. Ryan was particularly adept at profiling personalities and relationships that shaped politics. He died in 1984 while covering an Indiana governor’s race.
  • Ed Staats was a reporter, editor and administrator in 10 Associated Press (AP) offices throughout the United States. Staats retired last year after 18 years as chief of AP’s Kentucky operations. During his years in the state, he volunteered many hours of his time for service on journalistic and professional advisory boards.
  • Carl West, editor of The Frankfort State Journal since 1979, was a former White House and Pentagon correspondent for the Scripps Howard News Service. West covered the Watergate scandal that led to President Richard Nixon’s resignation. As State Journal editor, he has helped numerous young journalists develop into seasoned reporters and editors. He is also founder of the popular Kentucky Book Fair.

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