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Adults Evenly Divided on Later Bar Hours

Contact: Mary Margaret Colliver

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The Survey Research Center said the results of the survey do not necessarily indicate that there would be “masses of additional people” staying out later drinking at the bars on weekends if the hours were extended by the Lexington Fayette/Urban County Government Council. Among those who had drank in the past month (about 65 percent of the sample), only 25 percent said they would be likely to stay out longer drinking, and about two-thirds of the respondents said it would be “very unlikely.”

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2003) -- A recent poll of adults in Lexington/Fayette County by the University of Kentucky Survey Research Center found respondents evenly divided on a question of whether bars should be allowed to sell alcohol after the current 1 a.m. prohibition.

The survey found that about 47 percent of survey respondents favor and about 47 percent are opposed to the later bar-opening hours. The number of respondents favoring extended hours for liquor sales on weekends was higher – 54 percent in favor and 42 percent opposed.

Among those who had consumed any alcohol in the month prior to the interview, 68 percent were in favor of the weekends-only proposal, while only 34 percent of those who had not had a drink in the past month were in favor.

The Survey Research Center said the results of the survey do not necessarily indicate that there would be “masses of additional people” staying out later drinking at the bars on weekends if the hours were extended by the Lexington Fayette/Urban County Government Council. Among those who had drank in the past month (about 65 percent of the sample), only 25 percent said they would be likely to stay out longer drinking, and about two-thirds of the respondents said it would be “very unlikely.”

The questions were part of a Lexington Issues 2003 survey conducted by telephone July 19 through Aug. 17 with 1,091 randomly selected adult Fayette County residents. The surveys margin of error is plus or minus 2.97 percent.

For more information on the survey, visit the Web Site.


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