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Vardi on Logic’s Ties to Computers

Contact: Dan Adkins

Photo of Moshe Y. Vardi
Moshe Y. Vardi

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Vardi’s non-technical lecture seeks to support his position that logic, dating from Aristotle and Euclid, actually gave rise to computer science. He will focus on logic’s fundamental role in a broad range of computer science areas of study, including computer architecture, software engineering, programming languages, databases, artificial intelligence, algorithms, and computation theory. He has titled his talk “Logic Begat Computer Science: When Giants Roamed the Earth.”

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 14, 2003) -- Moshe Y. Vardi, director of Rice University’s Computer and Information Technology Institute, will deliver a lecture on the relationship and growing interaction of logic and computer science at 5:15 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19, at the William T. Young Library auditorium at the University of Kentucky. The event is part of the Distinguished Lecture Series organized by the Department of Computer Science, UK College of Engineering.

Vardi’s non-technical lecture seeks to support his position that logic, dating from Aristotle and Euclid, actually gave rise to computer science. He will focus on logic’s fundamental role in a broad range of computer science areas of study, including computer architecture, software engineering, programming languages, databases, artificial intelligence, algorithms, and computation theory. He has titled his talk “Logic Begat Computer Science: When Giants Roamed the Earth.”

Vardi earned his doctoral degree from Hebrew University in 1981. He joined the IBM Almaden Research Center in 1985. Then in 1993, he joined the Department of Computer Science at Rice University, where he is the Karen Ostrum George Professor in Computational Engineering. He served as the department’s chair from 1994 to 2002 and became the director of the Computer and Information Technology Institute at Rice in 2002.

Vardi is the recipient of three IBM Outstanding Innovation Awards and a co-winner of the 2000 Goedel Prize, awarded jointly by the European Association for Theoretical Computer Science (EATCS) and the Special Interest Group on Algorithms and Computing Theory of the Association of Computing Machinery.


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