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Same-sex Survey Reveals Opposition

Contact: Ralph Derickson

 

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Those surveyed were asked if they agreed or disagreed that the city should provide benefits for non-married or same-sex partners of city employees just as it provides benefits to spouses of married employees.

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 23, 2003) -- The University of Kentucky Survey Research Center recently completed a survey of Lexington/Fayette County adults asking their opinions about a variety of current local issues, including whether the city should provide benefits to same-sex and unmarried couples.

On the topic of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government providing benefits to same-sex and unmarried couples, the results show only 39 percent of the adults surveyed support such a program.

Of those opposed, almost 80 percent said they strongly disagreed with such a policy.

Those surveyed were asked if they agreed or disagreed that the city should provide benefits for non-married or same-sex partners of city employees just as it provides benefits to spouses of married employees.

The results showed 24.6 percent strongly agreed with the statement and 14.1 percent somewhat agreed while 11.8 percent somewhat disagreed and 45.3 percent strongly disagreed. Less than 1 percent of the respondents said their response would depend on the cost implications of such a policy.

“Perhaps not surprisingly,” said Ronald E. Langley, director of UK’s Survey Research Center, “ideologically conservative respondents were much more likely to oppose this policy, as were those who identify with the Republican Party.”

Langley added that men and older respondents were somewhat more likely to oppose such a benefits policy. “Race, education, household income, household size, and whether respondents had children had no statistically significant effect,” he added.

Survey respondents were also asked, “Do you think it was appropriate for the mayor to use executive powers to grant these benefits without consulting the council, or should she have worked through the council on this issue?”

A large majority of respondents – 86.2 percent of those who answered the survey – said the mayor should have worked with the council before granting the benefits; 12 percent said it was appropriate for the mayor to use executive powers to put the program in place.

The Lexington issues 2003 survey was conducted by telephone July 19 through August 17 with 1,091 randomly selected adult Fayette County residents. The survey’s margin of error is plus or minus 2.97 percent. For more information on the survey, visit http://survey.rgs.uky.edu/issues/.


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