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Hennig Appointed Director of Superfund

Contact: Jennifer Bonck

Photo of Bernhard Hennig
(Photo by UK Agricultural Communications)
Bernhard Hennig

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Hennig has been at UK since 1984, researching the link between nutrition and cardiovascular disease, and mentoring and teaching his students. His research emphasis involves tissue culture model systems in the study of nutrition and atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), with emphasis on the role of nutrients in cell function, injury and protection. His research has focused on the effects of individual fats (such as fatty acids and cholesterol) and protection that certain vitamins and minerals (e.g., vitamin E and zinc) may provide against the injury these fats may cause.

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 12, 2003) -- Bernhard Hennig, Ph.D., professor of nutrition and toxicology, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, has been appointed as the new director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund.

Hennig, who has had consistent funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for 20 years, has a primary appointment in the College of Agriculture. He also has academic appointments with the Graduate Center of Nutritional Sciences, Graduate Center for Toxicology, and the Center of Membrane Sciences, in the Department of Chemistry, UK College of Arts and Sciences. In addition, he is a member of the Gill Heart Institute. Hennig is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, and also serves on the editorial boards for the Journal of the American College of Nutrition and Nutrition Research.

A Fellow of the American College of Nutrition and of the Council on Arteriosclerosis of the American Heart Association, Hennig also is a council member of the Cardiovascular Hypertension Section of the American College of Nutrition.

Hennig has been at UK since 1984, researching the link between nutrition and cardiovascular disease, and mentoring and teaching his students. His research emphasis involves tissue culture model systems in the study of nutrition and atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), with emphasis on the role of nutrients in cell function, injury and protection. His research has focused on the effects of individual fats (such as fatty acids and cholesterol) and protection that certain vitamins and minerals (e.g., vitamin E and zinc) may provide against the injury these fats may cause.

In addition, Hennig is studying the interaction of nutrients with the toxic effects caused by specific environmental contaminants, particularly in the context of cardiovascular disease. Results from these studies may suggest novel therapy by providing a greater understanding of nutrition’s role as a key factor in diseases such as atherosclerosis.


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