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Reid Appointed Chair of Physiology

Contact: Jennifer Bonck

Photo of Michael B. Reid, Ph.D.
(photo by Ann Stroth)
Michael B. Reid, Ph.D.

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His laboratory is studying free radicals that regulate muscle function. These molecules influence the regulation of certain kinds of muscle movement. Under normal conditions, low levels of free radicals are essential for normal muscle functioning. Long-term elevation of free radicals, however, can result in negative consequences that promote protein breakdown. Such events are thought to accelerate the weakness, physical inactivity, and premature death that occur in chronic inflammatory diseases.

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 16, 2003) -- Michael B. Reid, Ph.D., professor of physiology, has been appointed chair of the Department of Physiology in the University of Kentucky College of Medicine.

Reid, who received his doctorate from University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, studies processes in the body underlying diseases such as cancer, emphysema, congestive heart failure, and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

His laboratory is studying free radicals that regulate muscle function. These molecules influence the regulation of certain kinds of muscle movement. Under normal conditions, low levels of free radicals are essential for normal muscle functioning. Long-term elevation of free radicals, however, can result in negative consequences that promote protein breakdown. Such events are thought to accelerate the weakness, physical inactivity, and premature death that occur in chronic inflammatory diseases.

Understanding these processes in cells may lead to the long-term goal of the research, which is to understand the biology of skeletal muscle and to identify therapy that can protect or improve muscle performance.

“I look forward to my time here at UK. Our department already is well ranked on the national level in NIH funding, and is poised to be an even more highly visible name in departments of its kind throughout the country,” said Reid. “I hope to continue the department’s goals of attracting excellent faculty, staff and students; providing comprehensive training and education for tomorrow’s scientists; and conducting research that will lead to a better understanding of human disease.”


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