Geographer Looks at Geopolitics of Terror

Contact: Ralph Derickson

Image of cover of "11 September and Its Aftermath" by Stanley D. Brunn

""

Brunn cites many geopolitical results of 9/11, including the fact that both civil warring factions in Sri Lanka used Sept. 11 events to justify their own actions in that war, and though he concludes that while much is known about Sept. 11 – through writings ranging from general journalism to scholarly journals – a great deal is yet to be learned “and we better catch up fast because there’s a long way to go.”

""

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 22, 2004) -- A just-released book of essays edited by University of Kentucky geography professor Stanley D. Brunn examines the changes in the geopolitical makeup of the world brought about by the destruction of the World Trade Center twin towers Sept. 11, 2001.

In “11 September and Its Aftermath: The Geopolitcs of Terror,” an international team of political geographers and political scientists present in a series of 11 original essays the impacts of that fateful day on foreign policies and international relations.

The authors in the book, published by Frank Cass Publishers, draw from a variety of different perspectives to discuss America and emerging world orders, terrorism, environmental security, civil society, and the visual and print media.

Brunn, who has a 1966 doctorate in geography from Ohio State University and who has taught at UK since 1980, said he began thinking about putting the volume of essays together immediately after learning of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack in New York.

Brunn said he knew scholars from many other academic disciplines would be studying and writing about 9/11 and, “I believed geographers in the scholarly community should have something to say about why this happened and the impacts it will have on the world.”

Brunn wrote the introduction to the book which includes 10 other topics related to 9/11 that he says should be studied in a scholarly fashion.

In his introduction, Brunn concludes that the events of Sept. 11, 2001, have become a part of the “global memory.”

“Every continent and country to some extent feels the impact of the 11 September events,” he said.

Four of the essays in the book were written or co-written by UK geography doctoral recipients or graduates. Those writers are Margo Kleinfleld, a current geography doctoral student; Carl Dahlman, who is on the faculty of the University of South Carolina; Chris Jasparo, a member of the faculty of the Military College of Hanover; and John Taylor, who is on the faculty at California State University in Fullerton, Calif.

Among the essay titles are “The Naming of ‘Terrorism’ and Evil ‘Outlaws’: Geopolitical Place-Making After 11 September,” “Environmental Terrorism: A Critique,” and “Tabloid Realism and the Revival of American Security Culture.”

Brunn cites many geopolitical results of 9/11, including the fact that both civil warring factions in Sri Lanka used Sept. 11 events to justify their own actions in that war, and though he concludes that while much is known about Sept. 11 – through writings ranging from general journalism to scholarly journals – a great deal is yet to be learned “and we better catch up fast because there’s a long way to go.”

“We just don’t know very much about terrorism and the religions and cultures of terrorism, Islam, and the interfaces between religion and foreign policy,” he said.


Back to Campus News Homepage