Students Awarded AHA Predoctoral Awards

Contact: Amy Gilliam

Photo of Garland Crawford, Lisa Senetar, Amanda Knoebber, Nathan Correll, and Cara Pager
(l-r) Garland Crawford, Lisa Senetar, Amanda Knoebber, Nathan Correll, and Cara Pager

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Each predoctoral student will work with a mentor prior to beginning a postgraduate research career and will receive research training and experience. The students will dedicate full-time effort to research or activities directly related to their growth as independent researchers.

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 30, 2004) -- Five University of Kentucky College of Medicine students in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry have been awarded American Heart Association Ohio Valley Affiliate Predoctoral Fellowships. The students are Nathan Correll of Robards, Ky.; Garland Crawford of Paducah, Ky.; Amanda Knoebber of Newport, Ky.; Cara Pager of Johannesburg, South Africa; and Lisa Senetar of Louisa, Ky.

The fellowships are designed to help students initiate careers in cardiovascular research by providing research assistance and training.

“Researchers in our department are working very hard to understand and attack many different types of human diseases including heart disease, Alzheimer’s and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which also is known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, cancer, diabetes, and viral infection, just to name a few,” said Kevin Sarge, professor, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, UK College of Medicine, and director of Graduate Studies for the department. “The ability of our students to successfully compete for this type of research funding is very important because it will help us reach our goals sooner in the fight against these terrible diseases that affect the lives of so many people.”

Each predoctoral student will work with a mentor prior to beginning a postgraduate research career and will receive research training and experience. The students will dedicate full-time effort to research or activities directly related to their growth as independent researchers.

"I believe the large number of fellowships obtained by our graduate students is a reflection of the high quality of students that are attracted to our program, the strength of the research being conducted here, and the hard work and dedication of both the students and faculty,” said Becky Dutch, assistant professor, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, UK College of Medicine, and program mentor.

The $18,000 award is granted for a period of one to two years.


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