UK Police Department Seeks Accreditation

Contact: Kathy Johnson

 

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Otto also announced a recent reorganization within UK Police, including the promotion of four officers. Captain Stephanie Bastin was promoted to assistant chief. She is a 25-year veteran of the UK Police Department and is now in charge of the department’s operational functions, which include the areas of patrol, investigations, Medical Center and security operations. Lt. Joe Monroe, a 10-year UKPD veteran, was promoted to major and assumes duties as the commander in charge of the department’s administrative and support service functions to include the areas of fiscal affairs, communications and records, crime prevention, emergency management, and public information. Sgt. Tiua Chilton and Sgt. Paul Grant were promoted to lieutenant. Chilton is a 9-year veteran of the agency and Grant is a 6-year veteran. Both remain assigned to patrol.

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 30, 2004) -- The University of Kentucky Police Department will seek international accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation of Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA). Other law enforcement agencies in Kentucky that have received CALEA accreditation include the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Division of Police, Kentucky State Police, and Jeffersontown and Newport Police departments. Two Southeastern Conference schools, the University of Florida and the University of South Carolina, have obtained accreditation while Vanderbilt University has begun the process.

CALEA was formed in 1979 by four major organizations: International Association of Chiefs of Police, National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives, National Sheriffs' Association, and Police Executive Research Forum. CALEA's 21-member Board of Commissioners regulates all aspects of the accreditation process and is comprised of 11 members with a law enforcement background and 10 from the public and private sector.

“Since it is the University of Kentucky’s vision to be one of the top academic and research institutions in the nation, it seemed only natural to take the next step to attain the top level of accreditation for the university’s police department,” said UK Police Chief Fred Otto.

The UK Police Department already is accredited by the Kentucky Association of Chiefs of Police. The state accreditation process required the department to examine policies and procedures to assure compliance with more than 100 state standards. Taking this process to the next level will require the department to assure compliance with nearly 450 international standards.

According to its timetable for accreditation, the UK Police Department anticipates its mock inspection to be scheduled in spring 2005. The actual on-site inspection by CALEA accreditation assessors is anticipated to occur in early summer 2005. Based on this schedule and a successful assessment by the CALEA team, accreditation would be awarded in November 2005.

Like the state program, CALEA accreditation is a voluntary program that requires commitment from all levels of an organization Otto said. “From this point on, all members of the University of Kentucky Police Department will play an important role in this process, especially division commanders and lieutenants as they work to ensure their areas of responsibility are in compliance with all related international accreditation standards,” he said. “Members of the community also will be asked for input as to the role they believe the department plays, or should play, in the university community in order to better serve them.”

Overseeing the department's progress will be Major Joe Monroe, CALEA program manager, who will serve as a coach and a point of reference in helping to interpret standards and answer questions.

Both CALEA and state accreditation provide uniformity among police departments, ensuring compliance with the same group of standards. Having clear policies in all areas eliminates misconceptions about department operations. Other benefits of accreditation include improved administrative functions within the department, greater accountability from supervisors, and the opportunity for increased governmental and community support. Standards are tailored to the size of a department and the functions it performs.

“Departments that have attained accreditation or are in the process of doing so are typically regarded as lead police departments in their area and often earn recognition for their innovative practices,” said Otto.

Otto also announced a recent reorganization within UK Police, including the promotion of four officers. Captain Stephanie Bastin was promoted to assistant chief. She is a 25-year veteran of the UK Police Department and is now in charge of the department’s operational functions, which include the areas of patrol, investigations, Medical Center and security operations. Lt. Joe Monroe, a 10-year UKPD veteran, was promoted to major and assumes duties as the commander in charge of the department’s administrative and support service functions to include the areas of fiscal affairs, communications and records, crime prevention, emergency management, and public information. Sgt. Tiua Chilton and Sgt. Paul Grant were promoted to lieutenant. Chilton is a 9-year veteran of the agency and Grant is a 6-year veteran. Both remain assigned to patrol.

Otto expressed pride in the accomplishments of the newly promoted officers. “I am sure the university community and the citizens of Lexington will greatly benefit from the qualities that these individuals bring to their supervisory positions.”


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