Griffith Garners National Teaching Award

Contact: Amanda Nelson

Photo of Charles H. Griffith
Charles H. Griffith

""

Griffith’s research examines how medical education influences patient outcomes, notable patient satisfaction, and procedural efficiency. He also has studied medical education outcomes and the relationship between student examination performance and resident teaching characteristics.

""

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 9, 2004) -- Dr. Charles H. Griffith, associate professor, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, is one of four medical school faculty members from across the nation to receive the 2004 Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) medical honor society’s Robert J. Glaser Distinguished Teacher Award, presented at the annual meeting of the Association of American Medical Colleges. The award is presented annually to two clinical and two basic science medical school faculty members in the nation.

Griffith has received more UK teaching awards and recognitions than any other faculty member in the history of the UK College of Medicine. In the 11 years he has served as director of the internal medicine clerkship, the course has been awarded the Clerkship Excellence Award eight times, including the past seven years in a row.

Although he teaches several courses, Griffith develops a personal relationship with all of his students. As a result, he serves as informal counselor and adviser to half of each graduating medical school class. He is the only medical school faculty member to be selected by the students as “honorary class member” on more than one occasion; he has received this title four times. He has received the UK College of Medicine’s Clinical Golden Apple teaching award, which is selected by students, eight times. He was one of two inaugural recipients of the UK Joe Davis Fellows award for commitment to outstanding teaching.

Griffith earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1984 and his medical degree in 1988 from Vanderbilt University. He completed his residency and fellowship at UK, where he also earned a graduate degree in public health. He joined the UK College of Medicine faculty in 1994.

Griffith’s research examines how medical education influences patient outcomes, notable patient satisfaction, and procedural efficiency. He also has studied medical education outcomes and the relationship between student examination performance and resident teaching characteristics.

The award is named for long-time AOA executive secretary Dr. Robert J. Glaser and was initiated in 1988 to provide national recognition to outstanding faculty members who have distinguished themselves in medical student education.


Back to Campus News Homepage