Nuclear Disarmament Dialogue Slated

Contact: Amy Gilliam

 

""

The medical students who will lead the session have formed a group called the Nuclear Weapons Inheritance Project (NWIP). NWIP is an international project striving for global disarmament by raising awareness of the human consequences of nuclear policies among students, training students in nuclear weapons and disarmament issues, and empowering students to undertake disarmament activities on a national and international level.

""

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 11, 2004) -- The International Federation of Medical Student Associations at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine will present a Nuclear Disarmament Dialogue and dinner from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 12, at UK Max Kade German House, 212 E. Maxwell St., Lexington.

A potluck dinner and workshop will be combined. The event is free and open to the public.

Presenters will include Rune Dahl, medical student from Norway; Martina Grosch, medical student from Sweden; Jay Augsburger, medical student from University of Cincinnati; and Chris Brubaker, medical student from the University of Cincinnati and president of UC's student chapter of Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR).

PSR is the American affiliate of International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW), an international group of medical professionals working for disarmament and prevention of deadly conflict. IPPNW was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1985.

The medical students who will lead the session have formed a group called the Nuclear Weapons Inheritance Project (NWIP). NWIP is an international project striving for global disarmament by raising awareness of the human consequences of nuclear policies among students, training students in nuclear weapons and disarmament issues, and empowering students to undertake disarmament activities on a national and international level.

The project has existed for three years and uses interactive training methods and non-confrontational dialogue to give special emphasis to activities in nuclear weapons nations. They have conducted dialogues and training sessions around the world, including Russia, China, India, Pakistan, China and America.

The visit will be quite different from traditional lectures. Designed and run by students, the dialogues are aimed at audiences with mixed and opposing viewpoints.

The event is sponsored by International Federation of Medical Student Associations at UK College of Medicine and Central Kentucky Council for Peace and Justice.


Back to Campus News Homepage