Cardiovascular Disease Research Highlighted

Contact: Amanda Nelson

 

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Special events that day will include presentations by the recipients of the Gill Heart Institute award for Outstanding Contributions and the Young Physician Scientist award. A 12:15 p.m. lunch seminar will be presented by Roger Newton, executive vice president of Esperion Therapeutics, a division of Pfizer Global Research and Development.

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 19, 2004) -- The opening of the University of Kentucky Linda and Jack Gill Building in April helped demonstrate the emphasis placed on cardiovascular disease research and care at UK. The seventh annual Gill Heart Institute Cardiovascular Research Day highlights the efforts of UK cardiology physicians and researchers to find ways to prevent and repair cardiovascular disease damage.

Cardiovascular disease, which includes high blood pressure, atherosclerosis, and stroke, is the most common cause of death in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of deaths related to heart complications continues to rise.

In support of regional research in cardiovascular disease and physiology, the Gill Heart Institute is hosting its Cardiovascular Research Day at 11 a.m. Monday, Oct. 25, at the Lexington Convention Center. Activities include poster presentations, seminars, and lectures on cardiovascular disease and treatment. First, second and third place cash awards will be given for the best poster presentations in fellow and student categories.

Special events that day will include presentations by the recipients of the Gill Heart Institute award for Outstanding Contributions and the Young Physician Scientist award. A 12:15 p.m. lunch seminar will be presented by Roger Newton, executive vice president of Esperion Therapeutics, a division of Pfizer Global Research and Development.

Such support of cardiovascular research is vitally important in Kentucky and surrounding states. Kentucky, along with its neighboring states along the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, has such a high rate of heart disease that the area has been designated the “ Coronary Valley.” In 2000, heart disease accounted for nearly one-third of all deaths in Kentucky, according to American Heart Association statistics obtained from the Kentucky Cabinet for Health Services.

For more information on Gill Heart Institute Cardiovascular Research Day 2004, visit the Web site.


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