International Finance Expert to Speak

Contact: Ralph Derickson

 

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Eichengreen has served as adviser to the International Monetary Fund and many national governments and has had a distinguished career in advancing understanding of how international economics affects domestic politics and economics.

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 20, 2004) -- Barry Eichengreen, an expert on the history, economics and politics of international finance and the George C. Pardee and Helen N. Pardee Professor of Economics and Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley, will speak at 2:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 29, in the University of Kentucky William T. Young Library Auditorium.

His talk, titled “Global Imbalances and the Lessons of Bretton Woods,” is sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences and is free and open to the public.

“The Bretton Woods system established the rules for commercial and financial relations among the major industrial states from the end of World War II until the early 1970s. The U.S. dollar played a crucial role in sustaining the system and maintaining stable international economic relations. The economic volatility in the post-Bretton Woods era has led many to yearn for a return to such a system,” said Matthew Gabel, UK associate professor of political science and coordinator of the lecture.

Gabel said Eichengreen has served as adviser to the International Monetary Fund and many national governments and has had a distinguished career in advancing understanding of how international economics affects domestic politics and economics.

“His current research addresses questions about how America’s federal fiscal policy – and, therefore, our ability to pay for defense, social programs and health care – is closely tied to the international financial system in crucial ways,” said Gabel. “This is important work because it shows that the current character of the international financial system could have potentially dramatic effects on domestic politics and economics in the United States. In other words, we ignore international finance at our own peril.”


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