Leading Effort on Computational Research

Contact: Dan Adkins

 

""

Among the supercomputers available on the grid is UK’s Hewlett-Packard Superdome, which is capable of more than a trillion calculations per second. The Center for Computational Sciences plans an upgrade to that machine that will more than double its capability.

""

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 29, 2004) -- The National Science Foundation (NSF) has chosen the University of Kentucky to lead a $3 million project to facilitate improved computational research in chemistry.

The UK Center for Computational Sciences will work with the University of Illinois, Louisiana State University, Ohio State University, and the University of Texas on the program, called the Computational Chemistry Grid, said center director John Connolly.

The project will benefit the national chemistry research community by providing computer hardware and software to solve problems involving molecular interactions of complex materials such as biological proteins and pharmaceuticals. The program will develop and deploy new grid software on national networks such as the NSF-sponsored Teragrid and the nationwide collections of universities involved in Internet 2.

The Computational Chemistry Grid will be open to all U.S. scientists who have priority projects that need advanced software and access to a supercomputer network.

Among the supercomputers available on the grid is UK’s Hewlett-Packard Superdome, which is capable of more than a trillion calculations per second. The Center for Computational Sciences plans an upgrade to that machine that will more than double its capability.

The program is funded under the NSF’s National Middleware Initiative, a program that encourages more efficient use of modern grid computing. “Middleware” refers to software that manages interactions among computers connected by remote networks while protecting the member machines’ security and privacy.


Back to Campus News Homepage