Administrative Structure


Executive Committee

Michael Bardo earned his PhD at Iowa State University in 1980, specializing in animal learning and psychopharmacology, and he received postdoctoral training in neuropharmacology in the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Iowa. In 1982, he assumed a faculty position in the Department of Psychology at the University of Kentucky, where he now holds the rank of Full Professor. Bardo has over 100 publications and he currently serves as Director of CDART. His current research interests are focused on understanding the role of environmental stimuli in controlling drug self-administration in laboratory animals, and the long-term goal is to translate this basic science into the development of improved prevention interventions. Dr. Bardo was a founding member of the Society for Prevention Research.

  • 2014 Mentorship Award, College on Problems of Drug Dependence
  • 2011-present Board of Directors, College on Problems of Drug Dependence


http://www.uky.edu/AS/Psychology/faculty/mbardo.html

email: mbardo@uky.edu



Linda Dwoskin is a neuropharmacologist and the US Surgical-Pfizer Endowed Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences in the College of Pharmacy. She earned her PhD from the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Minnesota in 1983. In 1988, Dwoskin was appointed as an Assistant Professor in the College of Pharmacy and rose through the ranks to become the first woman basic-scientist Full Professor in the College. Dwoskin has over 100 publications and 15 patent and patent applications. Dwoskin serves on the Executive Committee of CDART and as a co-investigator on Project 1. Her research interests are focused on the development of novel treatments for drug abuse and on understanding the role of genetics and environmental factors underlying individual responsiveness to drugs of abuse and an individual's potential for abuse liability

http://www.uky.edu/Pharmacy/faculty/Dwoskin/

email: ldwoskin@email.uky.edu



Thomas Kelly earned his PhD at the University of Minnesota in 1983, specializing in Experimental Psychology and Behavioral Pharmacology. He received postdoctoral training in Human Behavioral Pharmacology at the Veterans Administration Medical Center and in the Department of Psychiatry at the Louisiana State University School of Medicine in Shreveport, Louisiana. In 1992, he assumed a faculty position in the Department of Behavioral Science at the University of Kentucky, where he now holds the rank of Full Professor. Kelly currently serves as the Scientific Director of CDART and is Principal Investigator for Project 2. His current research interests are focused on understanding individual differences in vulnerability to drug abuse and environmental influences on drug abuse liability.

http://www.mc.uky.edu/behavioralscience/kelly.asp

email: thkelly@uky.edu



Donald Lynam Donald Lynam earned his PhD at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in clinical psychology in 1995. He is currently a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Purdue University. He has over 50 publications and was the 2002 recipient of the American Psychological Association Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology. He is currently a member of the CDART executive committee and Principal Investigator for Project 3. His current research interests are focused on understanding the role of individual differences in personality on the development and maintenance of deviant behavior (i.e., antisocial behavior, substance abuse, and risky sexual behavior).

'>Don Lynam's website

email: dlynam@psych.purdue.edu



Richard Millich earned his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Washington University in 1976, and did postdoctoral work in child psychopathology at the University of Iowa. In 1985 he joined the faculty in the Department of Psychology at the University of Kentucky, where he is now Professor and Associate Chair. Milich is Administrative Director of CDART. His research interests involve children's behavior problems, especially attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder. He has been involved in a long-term follow-up study examining how these early behavior problems may put these children at risk for later substance use problems.

http://www.uky.edu/AS/Psychology/faculty/rmilich.html

email: milich@uky.edu



Richard Charnigo is an Associate Professor of Statistics and Biostatistics at the University of Kentucky. His research interests in statistics include theory and methods for mixture modeling and nonparametric regression. His areas of interest for applied research include organizational behavior, psychology, mechanical engineering, cardiology, and public health. He has been affiliated with CDART since 2006 and is currently director of its Statistics and Psychometrics Core.

www.richardcharnigo.net

email: RJCharn2@aol.com



Internal Advisory Committee

Chana Akins earned her PhD at the University of Texas/Austin in 1994, specializing in learning, comparative psychology, and sexual behavior, and she received postdoctoral training under Drs. Zentall and Bardo in the Department of Psychology at the University of Kentucky. In 1996, she assumed an Assistant Professor position in the Department of Psychology at the University of Kentucky, and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2003. Dr. Akins is currently involved in recruitment and training components of CDART. Her current research interest is focused on the effects of substance abuse on sexual motivation and behavior, and also prenatal effects of drugs of abuse on adult motivation and learning. She uses a unique visually-oriented bird species, Japanese quail, whose sexual motivation/behavior pattern and neurohormonal system have been well-studied.

http://www.uky.edu/AS/Psychology/faculty/cakins.html

email: ckakin1@uky.edu



Sharon Walsh is a Professor of Behavioral Science, Psychiatry, and Executive Director of the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research at the University of Kentucky. Dr. Walsh's clinical research has focused on pharmacological issues in opioid and cocaine dependence, including pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies of licit and illicit opioids and opioid treatment agents, including buprenorphine, methadone and LAAM, and has evaluated potential pharmacotherapies for efficacy and safety in the treatment of cocaine dependence. Her work has been supported through continuous funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse along with funding from private foundations and industry. She was the 1997 recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers conferred by President William Clinton.



email: sharon.walsh@uky.edu



Carrie Oser received her Ph.D. in sociology in 2004 from University of Georgia. She was appointed faculty in the Department of Sociology at the University of Kentucky in 2004. As an Associate Professor at the University of Kentucky, Dr. Carrie Oser has a history of drug abuse research and teaching. Her primary appointment is in the Department of Sociology with a joint appointment in the Department of Behavioral Science and faculty appointments in the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research (CDAR), Center for Drug Abuse Research Translation (CDART), and the Center for Research on Violence Against Women (CRVAW). She is known for drug abuse research on implementation science, criminal offenders, HIV, health disparities, and health services utilization. Dr. Oser teaches a variety of courses (e.g., Sociology of Alcohol and Drug Use, Criminological Theory, and Juvenile Delinquency) as well as mentors graduate students, post-doctoral candidates, and junior faculty. Dr. Oser is currently the Principal Investigator and Co-I for NIDA funded research. These administrative, research, teaching, and mentoring experiences make her well-suited to serve on CDART’s Internal Scientific Advisory Committee.

http://soc.as.uky.edu/users/cboser0

email: cboser0@uky.edu



Leslie Crofford earned her MD from the University of Tennessee Center for Health Sciences College of Medicine in Mephis Tennessee. Currently she is a Professor of Internal Medicine, Chief, Division of Rheumatology, Gloria W. Singletary Chair, and Director, Center for the Advancement of Women’s Health at the University of Kentucky. Her research interests are in Rheumatoid arthritis (inflammatory mediators, prostaglandins and cyclooxygenase); fibromyalgia epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology and treatment; epidemiology of autoimmune disease; intense immunosuppression and stem cell transplant in scleroderma; treatment of polymyositis/dermatomyositis.

http://www.mc.uky.edu/cvrc/faculty/crofford-leslie/

email: lcrofford@uky.edu



Paul Glaser is the Vice Chair of Research in the department of Psychiatry at the University of Kentucky. He holds both a M.D. and a Ph.D. Dr. Glaser's clinical research has focused on Pervasive Developmental Disorders, Developmental Pediatrics and Neuroscience Research.



email: pglas0@email.uky.edu



Statistics and Psychometrics Core

Gregory Smith earned his PhD from Wayne State University, in 1986. He assumed a faculty position at the University of Kentucky in 1989, where he now holds the rank of Full Professor. His research interests focus on risk for alcoholism, risk for eating disorders, and clinical assessment methodology. Some of that work involves development of basic theory with respect to both personality and learning. His psychometrics work has focused heavily on the development of measures that validly represent the target construct, and do so efficiently. His papers have described methods for test construction, methods for selecting items to measure constructs both validly and briefly, and methods for evaluating the validity of one’s measures. He has served as associate editor for the leading psychological assessment journal, and with two colleagues he recently published a book to be used to train doctoral students in psychometric theory and validation theory.

http://psychology.as.uky.edu/users/gsmith

email: gsmith@uky.edu



Donald Lynam Donald Lynam earned his PhD at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in clinical psychology in 1995. He is currently a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Purdue University. He has over 50 publications and was the 2002 recipient of the American Psychological Association Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology. He is currently a member of the CDART executive committee and Principal Investigator for Project 3. His current research interests are focused on understanding the role of individual differences in personality on the development and maintenance of deviant behavior (i.e., antisocial behavior, substance abuse, and risky sexual behavior).

'>Don Lynam's website

email: dlynam@psych.purdue.edu



Richard Charnigo is an Associate Professor of Statistics and Biostatistics at the University of Kentucky. His research interests in statistics include theory and methods for mixture modeling and nonparametric regression. His areas of interest for applied research include organizational behavior, psychology, mechanical engineering, cardiology, and public health. He has been affiliated with CDART since 2006 and is currently director of its Statistics and Psychometrics Core.

www.richardcharnigo.net

email: RJCharn2@aol.com



Richard Kryscio is Professor, Department of Statistics, College of Arts and Sciences and Chair, Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health at the University of Kentucky (UK) where he has been on the faculty for the past twenty-six years. He earned his doctorate in Statistics in 1972 from SUNY, Buffalo and did a one year post doctorate at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md. He has been the statistical collaborator on fifty five grants in the biomedical sciences in which he assumes responsibility for study design, power analysis, and data analysis. These grants cover diverse areas in biomedical research including traumatic brain injury, cancers of the central nervous system, screening for ovarian cancer, amythrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson’s Disease, Alzheimer’s Disease and drug abuse research. His research program emphasizes the application of applied probability to problems in public health with specific interests in clinical trials, spread of infectious diseases, spatial statistics, the temporal clustering of diseases, and statistical methodology in Alzheimer’s disease research including longitudinal data analysis.



email: kryscio@uky.edu



Training and Pilot Core

Linda Dwoskin is a neuropharmacologist and the US Surgical-Pfizer Endowed Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences in the College of Pharmacy. She earned her PhD from the Department of Pharmacology at the University of Minnesota in 1983. In 1988, Dwoskin was appointed as an Assistant Professor in the College of Pharmacy and rose through the ranks to become the first woman basic-scientist Full Professor in the College. Dwoskin has over 100 publications and 15 patent and patent applications. Dwoskin serves on the Executive Committee of CDART and as a co-investigator on Project 1. Her research interests are focused on the development of novel treatments for drug abuse and on understanding the role of genetics and environmental factors underlying individual responsiveness to drugs of abuse and an individual's potential for abuse liability

http://www.uky.edu/Pharmacy/faculty/Dwoskin/

email: ldwoskin@email.uky.edu



Craig Rush research interests are primarily focused on identifying putative pharmacotherapies for the management of stimulant dependence. Dr. Rush uses the principles of pharmacology and behavioral analysis to determine the effects of commonly abused stimulants alone and following pretreatment with the putative pharmacotherapy. Special emphasis is given to putative stimulant antagonists as well as agonist replacement therapies. Currently, there are four funded projects underway in Dr. Rush’s laboratory. The first project is investigating the neuropharmacology of stimulant abuse in humans. Specifically, this project is attempting to elucidate the role of dopamine, a chemical in the brain, in mediating the effects of stimulants in humans. They use a human drug-discrimination procedure and subject-rated drug-effect questionnaires to assess drug effects in volunteers with recent histories of stimulant use. This project has important implications for validating animal models and for understanding the neuropharmacology of stimulant abuse in humans. Two projects are investigating the efficacy of novel antipsychotics as putative pharmacotherapies for stimulant dependence. The final project is attempting to elucidate to identify the behavioral mechanism that mediates the clinical effects of agonist replacement therapies for cocaine dependence. This project will also determine the efficacy of novel agonist replacement therapies. These projects could have implications for the treatment of methamphetamine and cocaine dependence..

http://www.mc.uky.edu/behavioralscience/faculty/rush.asp

email: crush2@uky.edu