College of Social Work

Social Work - Graduate

39

credit hours

Advance Standing Program for BASW graduates

60

credit hours

Regular Program for all other undergraduate degrees

2

Concentration Models

Clinical or Community & Social Development

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social worker, counselor, educator, special needs, special education, community worker, social welfare, social justice, social work education, school social worker, social work educator

Steven P. Adkins, MA

College of Social Work

MSW Admissions/Academic Advisor

College of Social Work

University of Kentucky College of Social Work

619 Patterson Office Tower

Lexington, Kentucky, 40506-0027

Program website

(859) 257-1971

The College of Social Work at the University of Kentucky offers an innovative and exciting MSW curriculum based on ethical imperatives, research to practice and sound assessments and interventions. Its aim is to equip MSW graduates for the tasks and responsibilities they will encounter in professional Social Work Practice. The MSW program is accredited by the Council of Social Work Education (CSWE) and has been since 1970. Students may attend classes on UK’s main campus in Lexington, at Morehead State University, or at the UK Center for Excellence in Rural Health-Hazard in Southeast Kentucky.

Career Opportunities in Social Work

YOU can make a difference!

  • Administration
  • Adoption
  • Advocacy
  • Child Welfare
  • Community Outreach
  • Counselor
  • Criminal Justice
  • Developmental Disabilities
  • Education
  • Foster Care
  • Gerontology
  • Immigrants and Refugees
  • International Social Work
  • Intimate Partner Violence
  • Medical Social Worker
  • Mental Health Case Worker
  • Non-Profit Organizations
  • Public Health Outreach
  • School Social Worker
  • Substance Abuse
  • Poverty
  • Public Policy
  • Veterans and Military Families

 

Graduating May 2016. She is also the proud recipient of the 2015-2016 McNair Scholars Fellowship, and a participant in the Integrated Behavioral Health Track in the Clinical Social Work concentration. A Chicago native, she received her BSW from Southern Illinois University. While at Southern Illinois University, she earned the distinct honor of being named social work student of the year for 2015.

Siedah McNeil

Advanced standing MSW student

Current Curriculum Information

Access Major Template

source: myUK: GPS

  • Social Work (BA) 120 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • UK 101 - ACADEMIC ORIENTATION1

    This course is designed to assist undergraduates in adjusting to the academic life of the University. Through lectures, discussions, exercises, and out-of-class assignments, UK 101 helps first-year students: articulate the purpose and nature of a college education at a research university; articulate UK’s expectations of its students; gain an appreciation of the University’s mission, history, and traditions; develop skills for achieving academic success such as study strategies and library research skills; increase awareness and use of campus resources; reflect on personal and social issues that first-year students often face in a college environment; become involved in the total life of the University; and form beneficial relationships with students, faculty, and staff.

  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. I3
  • SW - Social Justice Foundations3

    Please speak to your advisor regarding fulfilling this requirement.

  • PSY 100 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY4

    An introduction to the study of behavior covering theories, methods and findings of research in major areas of psychology. Topics covered will include the biological foundations of behavior; learning, perception, motivation, personality; developmental, abnormal, and social behavior; and methods of assessment. This course is a prerequisite to a significant number of courses in this and related areas of study. Lecture, three hours; laboratory/discussion, two hours.

  • MA 109 or MA 1113
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3
  • SW 124 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL SERVICES3

    Introduction to soical welfare concepts and philosophies. Examination of the profession of social work and its philosophy and value commitments within social welfare. Public and private service delivery systems will be studied. Required of social work majors and recommended it be taken the first year.

  • STA 210 - MAKING SENSE OF UNCERTAINTY: AN INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL REASONING3

    The goal of this course is to help students develop or refine their statistical literacy skills. Both the informal activity of human inference arising from statistical constructs, as well as the moral formal perspectives on statistical inference found in confidence intervals and hypothesis tests are studied. Throughout, the emphasis is on understanding what distinguishes good and bad inferential reasoning in the practical world around us.

  • SOC 101 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY3

    Introduction to the concepts and methods of sociology. Topics shall include socialization; group processes, social inequalities; social institutions; and social change. This course or its equivalent Sociology courses. Students may not receive credit for both this course and RSO 102.

  • BIO 103 - BASIC IDEAS OF BIOLOGY3

    Introductory biology. Discussion topics are those relevant to both plants and animals-- cell structure and function, molecules important to living things, metabolism, heredity, environment. Not for life science majors.

    • Total15
    • Total Freshman Hours30

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • PS 101 - AMERICAN GOVERNMENT3

    A survey of national government and the political process in the United States, with emphasis on the Constitution, the President, Congress, and the judicial system.

  • ANT 160 - CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE MODERN WORLD3

    Directed at non-majors, this course is intended to introduce the student to the diversity of human cultural experience in the contemporary world. Goals of the course include gaining an appreciation for the common humanity and uniqueness of all cultures; to gain a sensitivity toward stereotypes and ethnocentrism, and to understand the distinctions between "race," ethnicity and racism. The course features extended descriptions of the cultural dynamics of the culture(s) with which the instructor has worked.

  • PHI 120 - THE ART OF THINKING: AN INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC3

    A course which treats argumentation, syllogistic, and sentential logic. The focus will be on the use of formal methods in the construction and criticism of actual arguments, the aim being to inculcate standards of good reasoning, e.g., clarity, consistency and validity. Credit is not given to students who already have credit for PHI 320.

  • SW 222 - DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE3

    Study of the cultural traditions, value orientations, and political and economic forces which have contributed to the emergence of present social welfare policies and systems in the United States. Required of social work majors and open to all others.

  • UK Core - Arts and Creativity3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • UK Core - Humanities3
  • ECO 101 or ECO 2013
  • 300-500 level Social Science Elective3
  • 300-500 level Social Science Elective3
  • 300-500 level Social Science Elective3
    • Total15
    • Total Sophomore Hours30

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • SW 300 - SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I4

    An introduction to generalist social work practice theory, a study of skills in professional practice with individuals and families, and an examination of social work functions in the direct delivery of social services. Special attention is paid to the NASW Code of Ethics and to the social worker's obligations towards populations-at-risk. Class includes four hours per week of laboratory in health or welfare settings, and three lecture hours.

  • SW 421 - HUMAN BEHAVIOR AN DTHE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I3

    This foundation course is the first of a two part social work major course sequence that utilizes life perspective and other theories as tools for understanding human behavior and its development acrosss the lifespan. A "person in the environment" focus is utilized as students explore the interrelatedness of biological, social, cultural, psychological, and environmental factors in human behavior and its ongoing development. Particular attention will be given to exploring the impact of racism, sexism, ethnocentrism, classism, and homophobia on human behavior across the life journey.

  • SW 430 - SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY: THEORY AND IMPLEMENTATION3

    The study and demonstration of different analytic models utilized in analysis of social welfare policy. The course also introduces content in the areas of organizational theory, management tools necessary to the understanding of implementation and evaluation of social welfare policy.

  • 300-500 level Social Science Elective3
  • Free Elective3
    • Total16
Spring Semester
  • SW 444 - EDUCATIONAL PRACTICUM I5

    Introduction to social work practicum under faculty direction in a Teaching-Learning Center. Students will begin to apply knowledge from prerequisite (and concurrent) courses in experiences which utilize social work practice skills with emphasis on individuals, families, and small groups, toward the goals of prevention, restoration, and enhancement of social functioning.

  • SW 435 - Foundations of Professional Ethics in Social Work3

    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of ethical decision making in generalist professional social work practice. The major philosophical formulations that underlie ethics and relevant concepts derived from these formulations are highlighted as in the development of ethical reasoning and decision-making skills in dealing with moral problems and dilemmas that arise in entry-level social work practice.

  • SW 422 - HUMAN BEHAVIOR & THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II3

    This foundation course is the second in the sequence of two social work courses that focus on theory as a tool for understanding human behavior on multiple interacting levels, including: individual, family, small group, organization, community, and society. The course will explore the interrelatedness of biological, social, cultural, psychological, and environmental factors in human behavior and development. Particular attention will be given to exploring the impact of racism, sexism, ethnocentrism, classism, and homophobia on human behavior at each level.

  • SW 350 - SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE II: SURVEY OF GROUPS3

    This course introduces students to the place of group work in professional social work practice. Examined are the basic knowledge, specific rules, strategies, and skills when working with groups of vulnerable populations. This course assists students in recognizing the efficacy of practice with groups of different types that fulfill diverse purposes and are conducted in a variety of community and organizational settings. It introduces students to group dynamics, development, and techniques needed to be a succsesful group leader.

    • Total14
    • Total Junior Hours30

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • SW 450 - SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH4

    An introductory study and application of the process of research in building social work knowledge and developing effective social work practices.

  • SW 400 - SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE III4

    Emphasizing an ecological and systems framework, the course explores theories and practice approaches appropriate for work with groups, organizations, and community systems. The impact of discrimination and oppression on populations-at-risk is discussed, along with problem-solving and interventive strategies. The ethical and legal strategies of the generalist practitioner are studied.

  • SW 460 - UNDERSTANDING BEHAVIOR FROM A SOCIO-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE: THEORIES OF PSYCHOPATHOLOGY4

    Problematic behavior is discussed employing a social work perspective. Students are introduced to a bio-psycho-socio-cultural assesment model and the DSM IV-TR criteria for mental health disorders. Students learn to respect the person in his or her environment and not to categorize them by their problems or diagnosis. Risk/resiliency and strengths perspectives are utilized to understand mental disorders within a scio- cultural context. Emphasis is placed on understanding how theoretical models explain psychopathology and inform interventions in social work practice.

  • Free Elective3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • SW 445 - EDUCATIONAL PRACTICUM II8

    This course continues the process of social work practicum under faculty direction in a Teaching- Learning Center. Students will continue to apply knowledge from prerequisite and concurrent courses in experiences which utilize social work practice skills with individuals, families, and small groups as well as with organizations and communities toward the goals of prevention, restoration and enhancement of social functioning.

  • SW 470 - SENIOR SEMINAR3

    An integrative professional seminar for senior majors in social work, usually taken in the last semester of course work. Social work issues of an educational, professional and practice nature are examined. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • Free Elective3
    • Total15
    • Total Senior Hours30

Advanced Standing (39 credit hours) Admission Requirements

To be eligible to apply for Advanced Standing, applicants must have received their BASW or BSW from a CSWE accredited program within the last 5 years and present Grade Point Averages (GPA) at or above the following (firm) minimums:

Undergraduate GPA 3.0
Social Work GPA 3.5
Graduate GPA (if applicable) 3.0

Advanced Standing may be completed full-time (beginning in the Summer term) or part-time (beginning in the Fall term).

Candidates who are not admitted to Advanced Standing usually can be automatically considered for the Regular 60-credit program. Additionally at least 1 year of previous full-time paid social work-related experience is recommended.

Advance Standing Application Deadline

February 1st, 2018


Regular (60 credit hours) Admission Requirements

In order to be eligible for the Regular Program, applicants must have received their Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and present a Grade Point Average (GPA) at or above the following minimums:

Undergraduate GPA 3.0
Social Work GPA (if applicable) 3.0
Graduate GPA (if applicable) 3.0

The Regular Program may be completed full-time or part-time, beginning in the Fall term. 

If your past academic performance does not meet one or more of the GPA standards for admission to the 60-credit hour program, then you must complete the Petition for Exceptional Consideration, in addition to the other application components described below.

Regular Program Application Deadline

February 15, 2018
 


Application Materials

Please note that the admission procedures are the same for both 60-Hour MSW degree program and the advanced standing.

Transcripts:
You will be asked to upload copies of transcripts from all higher education institutions attended and, in the case of domestic students, to self-report cumulative GPA’s for each institution. If you are offered admission and decide to enroll you will then be required to submit official transcripts to the Graduate School.
 
Letters of Recommendation:
The MSW Program at the University of Kentucky requires applicants to provide three references. These references must be obtained from individuals in the following categories:
• Professor
• Social Work Professor
• Professional Social Worker/Field Instructor
• Work or Volunteer Supervisor
Please exclude personal, pastoral and relative references. If you graduated within the past 5 years you must provide at least one academic reference. As part of the online application you will be asked to supply email contact information for your three references.
 
Writing Sample (uploaded electronic document)
In 250 words or less, describe an ethical dilemma you encountered in either your professional or personal past. Identify and define the ethical problem, the parties involved, the values you relied upon to make your decisions, and how the dilemma was resolved. Explain how the outcome has affected you and any lessons you learned.
 
Personal Statement Autobiography (uploaded electronic document)
Your autobiography should be approximately four pages in length, double-spaced, and the following topics must be addressed within the narrative:
  1. Motivation for social service, social work education, and a career in the profession: State your reasons for wanting to pursue an MSW degree. Why are you applying to the University of Kentucky College Of Social Work? What are your social service interests and career goals?
  2. Personal life experiences and relevant events: Briefly describe your personal history as it relates to your interest in the profession of social work. What do you consider to be your particular strengths, skills and abilities that will contribute to your success in this field?
  3. Capacities for professional social work education: Briefly describe your professional, volunteer and/or educational history as it relates to your capacity for success in graduate study in the field of social work. What characteristics, circumstances, or challenges could serve to enhance or limit your capacity to pursue graduate level education in the field of social work?
Personal Resume (uploaded electronic document)
Please list in resumé format your work and volunteer experience.
 
Prequesite courses: Statistics, Psychology and Sociology
 
Access the Graduate School Application here.

Integrated Behavioral Health (IBH) Track

The Integrated Behavioral Health Track is the result of an Integrated Behavioral Healthcare (IBH) Education and Training Grant from Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

With our community partners, our team will work to improve access to integrated behavioral health services (IBH) in primary care settings for all ages in rural and/or medically underserved communities by increasing the number of IBH trained social workers entering the workforce. 

  • A new MSW curriculum will be implemented on all our campuses:  Lexington (Main), Morehead, Ashland, Hazard, and Prestonsburg
  • IBH Field sites/placements will be expanded in Fayette county and Eastern Kentucky
  • Student and health professional interprofessional healthcare education will be offered

All full-time and part-time MSW students enrolled on main and all off-campus sites will be eligible to apply for this stipend-supported specialized MSW IBH education and training.

Recruitment is occurring now and the first IBH cohort will be admitted in Fall 2018!

 

Meet our IBH MSW Education and Training Grant Team:

 Karen Badger, PhD, MSW (P.I.), College of Health Sciences

Professor Pam Weeks, JD, MSW (Co-I), College of Social Work

Bill Elder, PhD (Co-I), College of Medicine

Jarod Giger, PhD, MSW (Co-I), College of Social Work

For additional details:
Visit our website: https://socialwork.uky.edu/msw/integrated-behavioral-health-track-program/  

Contact:  Steven Adkins, MSW Program Advisor, steven.adkins@uky.edu

                  Lynn Hunter, LCSW, Clinical Field Coordinator, lynn.hunter@uky.edu  


Contact

social worker, counselor, educator, special needs, special education, community worker, social welfare, social justice, social work education, school social worker, social work educator

Steven P. Adkins, MA

College of Social Work

MSW Admissions/Academic Advisor

College of Social Work

University of Kentucky College of Social Work

619 Patterson Office Tower

Lexington, Kentucky, 40506-0027

(859) 257-1971

Get more information about going to the University of Kentucky