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College of Engineering

Biosystems Engineering

1

Biosystems Engineering

Program in KY

6

Specialty Areas

128

total credit hours

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Dr. Joseph Dvorak

Assistant Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies

Machine Systems Automation Engineering

College of Engineering

128 C.E. Barnhart Building

Lexington, KY 40546-0276

Program website

(859) 218-4349

  • BS

Biosystems engineers are trained in biological, environmental and engineering sciences and challenged to improve the sustainability of production systems, decrease or eliminate environmental hazards and preserve natural resources. Biosystems engineers devise practical, efficient solutions for producing, storing, transporting, processing and packaging biological and agricultural products. They solve problems related to systems, processes and machines that interact with humans, plants, animals, microorganisms and biological materials. They also develop solutions for responsible, alternative uses of biological products, byproducts and wastes and of our natural resources—soil, water, air and energy.

The University of Kentucky is the only college in Kentucky that offers Biosystems Engineering as an undergraduate major. The Biosystems Engineering program includes more specialty areas than other similar departments across the country too. This flexibility in the curriculum allows for each student to customize their technical electives to their future career goals. Undergraduate certificates are also available in power and energy as well as distillation, wine and brewing studies.

Biosystems Engineering Professor Sue Nokes and student

Current Curriculum Information

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source: myUK: GPS

  • Biosystems Engineering (BS) 132 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • EGR 101 - ENGINEERING EXPLORATION I1

    Engineering Exploration I introduces students to the engineering and computer science professions, College of Engineering degree programs, and opportunities for career path exploration. Topics and assignments include study skills, team development, ethics, problem solving and basic engineering tools for modeling, analysis and visualization. Open to students enrolled in the College of Engineering. Students who received credit for EGR 112 are not eligible for EGR 101.

  • EGR 102 - FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING COMPUTING2

    Fundamentals of Engineering Computing introduces students to the practice and principles of computer programming and computational problem solving. Students will engage in hands-on project-based problem solving using modern computer software and hardware, with a particular emphasis on problems and techniques commonly appearing in various domains of engineering. Open to students enrolled in the College of Engineering.

  • CHE 105 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I4

    A study of chemical principles and their application to pure and mixed substances. Not open to students who have already completed both CHE 109 and CHE 110.

  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. I3
  • MA 113 - CALCULUS I4

    A course is one-variable calculus, including topics from analytic geometry. Derivatives and integrals of elementary functions (including the trigonometric functions) with applications. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Students may not receive credit for MA 113 and MA 137. Prereq: Math ACT of 27 or above, or Math SAT of 620 or above, or a grade of C or better in MA 109 and in MA 112, or a grade of C or better in MA 110, or appropriate score on math placement test, or consent of the department. Students who enroll in MA 113 based on their test scores should have completed a year of pre-calculus study in high school that includes the study of trigonometric functions. Note: Math placement test recommended.

    • Total14
Spring Semester
  • EGR 103 - ENGINEERING EXPLORATION II2

    Engineering Exploration II focuses on a semester long engineering design project with students working in teams to apply the skills and tools introduced in EGR 101 or EGR 112 for transfer students and EGR 102. Topics and assignments include more in depth exploration of engineering tools for modeling, analysis, visualization, programming, hardware interfacing, team development, documentation and communication. Students gain experience in project management, identifying constraints, iteration and technical report writing.

  • MA 114 - CALCULUS II4

    A second course in Calculus. Applications of the integral, techniques of integration, convergence of sequence and series, Taylor series, polar coordinates. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MA 113, MA 137, or MA 132.

  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3
  • PHY 231 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS4

    First part of a two-semester survey of classical physics. Consequences of the principles of mechanics are developed conceptually, analytically and quantitatively. Lecture, three hours; recitation, one hour per week.

  • PHY 241 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS LABORATORY1

    A laboratory course offering experiments in mechanics and heat, framed in a small group environment that requires coordination and team work in the development of a well-written lab report.

  • UK Core (3 hours)3
    • Total17
    • Total Freshman Hours31

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • BAE 200 - PRINCIPLES OF BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING3

    The engineering problem solving approach will be practiced to analyze biological systems and to demonstrate the application of mathematical and scientific principles to engineering design.

  • BIO 148 - INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY I3

    BIO 148 introduces the student to the biological mechanisms operating at the molecular, cellular, and population level that contribute to the origin, maintenance, and evolution of biodiversity including the origins and history of the evolutionary process. Course material is presented within a phylogenetic context, emphasizing the shared history of all living organisms on earth through common ancestry. The first semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and BIO 152).

  • MA 213 - CALCULUS III4

    A course in multi-variable calculus. Topics include vectors and geometry of space, three-dimensional vector calculus, partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, integration on surfaces, Green’s theorem. Optional topics include Stokes’ theorem and the Gauss’ divergence theorem. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: MA 114 or MA 138 or equivalent.

  • PHY 232 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS4

    A general course covering electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves and physical optics. Lecture, three hours; recitation, one hour per week.

  • PHY 242 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS LABORATORY1

    A laboratory course offering experiments in electricity, magnetism, and light, framed in a small group environment that requires coordination and team work in the development of a well written lab report.

  • CE 106 - COMPUTER GRAPHICS AND COMMUNICATION3

    Introduction to visualization, orthographic projection, and computer- aided drawing. Graphical solution of spatial problems. Integrated use of computer graphics to create civil engineering drawings. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, three hours per week. Prereq or coreq: MA 113 or consent of instructor.

    • Total18
Spring Semester
  • BAE 202 - PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR BIOSYSTEMS3

    Introduction to statistics and statistical inference reasoning. Evaluation of common claims based on statistical constructs, hypothesis tests, margins of error, confidence intervals, and analysis of variation. Identification of possible statistical obstacles, such as confounding, missing data, and inappropriate randomness. Conceptual statistics will be emphasized. Special attention will be given to include biosystems engineering problems.

  • MA 214 - CALCULUS IV3

    MA 214 is a course in ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is on first and second order equations and applications. The course includes series solutions of second order equations and Laplace transform methods.

  • ME 220 - ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS I3

    Fundamental principles of thermodynamics.

  • CHE 107 - GENERAL COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II3

    A continuation of CHE 105. A study of the principles of chemistry and their application to elements and compounds.

  • EM 221 - STATICS3

    Study of forces on bodies at rest. Vector algebra; study of force systems; equivalent force systems; distributed forces; internal forces; principles of equilibrium; application to trusses, frames and beams; friction.

    • Total15
    • Total Sophomore Hours33

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • BAE 301 - ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF BIOSYSTEMS2

    The financial and managerial aspects of biosystems in evaluating design alternatives. Typical topics included are: concepts of present and future value, techniques of managerial economics, and biosystem design analysis in the evaluation of alternatives. Retirement/replacement policies and risk analysis.

  • EE 305 - ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS AND ELECTRONICS3

    A service course covering electrical engineering principles for engineering or science students with majors outside of electrical engineering. Topics include: AC and DC circuits analysis.

  • CE 341 - INTRODUCTION TO FLUID MECHANICS4

    Fundamental principles of thermodynamics and fluid flow. Includes fluids at rest, fluids in motion. Continuity, momentum and energy relations, ideal and viscous fluids. Emphasis on incompressible fluids. Description of pumps and open channels.

  • EM 313 - DYNAMICS3

    Study of the motion of bodies. Kinematics: cartesian and polar coordinate systems; normal and tangential components; translating and rotating reference frames. Kinetics of particles and rigid bodies: laws of motion; work and energy; impulse and momentum.

  • BIO 152 - PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II3

    The second semester of an integrated one-year sequence (BIO 148 and 152) that is designed to develop understanding and appreciation for the biocomplexity of multicellular eukaryotes, with emphasis on animals and terrestrial plants. Structure and function relationships will be explored at many levels of organization.

  • WRD 204 - TECHNICAL WRITING3

    Instruction and experience in writing for science and technology. Emphasis on clarity, conciseness, and effectiveness in preparing letters, memos, and reports for specific audiences. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

    • Total18
Spring Semester
  • BAE 305 - DC CIRCUITS AND MICROELECTRONICS3

    An introduction to the use of digital electronics and integrated circuits in solving biosystems engineering problems. Digital circuits, microprocessor concepts, computer interfacing, transducers, signal conditioning and control applications are discussed. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours per week.

  • EM 302 - MECHANICS OF DEFORMABLE SOLIDS3

    A study of stress and strain in deformable solids with application primarily to linear elastic materials: stress and strain transformations; simple tension and compression of axial members; torsion of shafts; bending of beams; combined loading of members; buckling of columns.

  • Biosystems Core Elective3
  • ME 325 - ELEMENTS OF HEAT TRANSFER3

    Fundamental principles of conduction, convection, radiation heat transfer. Numerical methods for heat transfer problems. Design and applications of heat transfer equipment such as fins and heat exchangers.

  • UK Core (3 hours)3
  • UK Core (3 hours)3
    • Total18
    • Total Junior Hours36

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • BAE 400 - SENIOR SEMINAR1

    A course for senior students in biosystems engineering with emphasis on oral communications skills. Students will do literature searches on topics related to the biosystems engineering profession and present oral and written reports.

  • BAE 402 - BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING DESIGN I2

    A design course for seniors in BAE requiring students to solve open-ended problems. Students will use previously learned engineering principles to produce actual designs which will be built and analyzed in BAE 403.

  • Biosyst Core Elec --OR-- Technical Elec3
  • Biosyst Core Elec --OR-- Technical Elec3
  • Biosyst Core Elec --OR-- Technical Elec3
  • Biological Science Elective3
    • Total15
Spring Semester
  • BAE 403 - BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING DESIGN II2

    Student design teams evaluate and enhance design solutions, fabricate prototypes, execute performance tests, analyze results, and develop final design specifications. Oral and written reports are required.

  • ME 340 - INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICAL SYSTEMS3

    Modeling of mechanical, thermal, hydraulic, and electrical systems, and other phenomena from a system viewpoint. Analysis of continuous-time models for free and forced response. Laplace transforms and transfer functions. Introduction to numerical simulation. Analysis of higher- order systems.

  • Biosyst Core Elec --OR-- Technical Elec3
  • Biosyst Core Elec --OR-- Technical Elec3
  • Supporting Elective3
  • UK Core (3 hours)3
    • Total17
    • Total Senior Hours32

Contact

Dr. Joseph Dvorak

Assistant Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies

Machine Systems Automation Engineering

College of Engineering

128 C.E. Barnhart Building

Lexington, KY 40546-0276

(859) 218-4349

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