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College of Engineering

Mining Engineering

1

of 13 accredited mining programs in U.S.

90%

of students have summer internship

74+

minerals mined worldwide

Restart your search

Dr. Joseph Sotille

Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies

Department of Mining Engineering

College of Engineering

Department of Mining Engineering

230 Mining and Mineral Resources Building

Lexington, KY 40506-0107

Program website

(859) 257-8026

  • BS

Mining engineers find, develop, and recover the resources needed to support the daily needs of society from the minerals required to support our daily health to the materials used for roads, buildings, computers, cell phones among most other items used daily. The mining engineering discipline requires a broad range of basic engineering skills along with the ability to apply specialized technical knowledge in the areas of geotechnical engineering, explosives engineering, ventilation, mine power systems, automation and control, environmental engineering and extractive metallurgy.

Careers

Design Your Future

If it can’t be grown, it must be mined and safe, effective and responsible mining relies on intelligent, skillful practitioners who can operate highly sophisticated mining devices. The Mining Engineering program at the University of Kentucky is one of only thirteen accredited programs in the United States. The faculty members are well known and highly respected in their specialized area throughout academia and the industry. Thus, students receive the highest quality education and training from instructors with practical knowledge of the discipline. Hands-on instruction is provided in state-of-the-art laboratories that house modern equipment used in each of the specialty areas of mining engineering.

Industries Looking for You 

  • Surface and underground mining
  • Coal mining
  • Phosphate mining
  • Explosives
  • Geotechnical engineering firms
  • Reclamation engineering companies
  • Regulatory agencies
"Over the span of my four years in the Department of Mining Engineering, I have come to understand what mining and this department is all about: people, experience, and opportunity."

Kristin

2014 Graduate, Mining Engineering

Current Curriculum Information

Access Major Template

source: myUK: GPS

  • Mining Engineering (BS) 135 hours

Click to toggle each Academic Year. Click each course for more information.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester
  • EGR 101 - ENGINEERING EXPLORATION I1

    Engineering Exploration I introduces students to the engineering and computer science professions, College of Engineering degree programs, and opportunities for career path exploration. Topics and assignments include study skills, team development, ethics, problem solving and basic engineering tools for modeling, analysis and visualization. Open to students enrolled in the College of Engineering. Students who received credit for EGR 112 are not eligible for EGR 101.

  • EGR 102 - FUNDAMENTALS OF ENGINEERING COMPUTING2

    Fundamentals of Engineering Computing introduces students to the practice and principles of computer programming and computational problem solving. Students will engage in hands-on project-based problem solving using modern computer software and hardware, with a particular emphasis on problems and techniques commonly appearing in various domains of engineering. Open to students enrolled in the College of Engineering.

  • Choose CHE 105 or PHY 2314
  • Composition and Communication I3
  • MA 113 - CALCULUS I4

    A course is one-variable calculus, including topics from analytic geometry. Derivatives and integrals of elementary functions (including the trigonometric functions) with applications. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Students may not receive credit for MA 113 and MA 137. Prereq: Math ACT of 27 or above, or Math SAT of 620 or above, or a grade of C or better in MA 109 and in MA 112, or a grade of C or better in MA 110, or appropriate score on math placement test, or consent of the department. Students who enroll in MA 113 based on their test scores should have completed a year of pre-calculus study in high school that includes the study of trigonometric functions. Note: Math placement test recommended.

    • Total14
Spring Semester
  • EGR 103 - ENGINEERING EXPLORATION II2

    Engineering Exploration II focuses on a semester long engineering design project with students working in teams to apply the skills and tools introduced in EGR 101 or EGR 112 for transfer students and EGR 102. Topics and assignments include more in depth exploration of engineering tools for modeling, analysis, visualization, programming, hardware interfacing, team development, documentation and communication. Students gain experience in project management, identifying constraints, iteration and technical report writing.

  • UK Core - Comp. & Comm. II3

    Composition and Communication II

  • MA 114 - CALCULUS II4

    A second course in Calculus. Applications of the integral, techniques of integration, convergence of sequence and series, Taylor series, polar coordinates. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: A grade of C or better in MA 113, MA 137, or MA 132.

  • Choose CHE 105 or PHY 2314
  • PHY 241 --OR-- CHE 1113
  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Social Sciences3
    • Total17
    • Total Freshman Hours31

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester
  • EM 221 - STATICS3

    Study of forces on bodies at rest. Vector algebra; study of force systems; equivalent force systems; distributed forces; internal forces; principles of equilibrium; application to trusses, frames and beams; friction.

  • EES 220 - PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL GEOLOGY4

    How the Earth Works: an integrated course in physical geology, covering the physical, chemical and biological processes that combine to produce geological processes. Attention is focused on plate tectonics, earth surface processes, and properties and formation of earth materials. Lab exercises emphasize identification and interpretation of geologic materials and maps. Lecture/Discussion, three hours per week; laboratory, three hours per week.

  • MA 213 - CALCULUS III4

    A course in multi-variable calculus. Topics include vectors and geometry of space, three-dimensional vector calculus, partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, integration on surfaces, Green’s theorem. Optional topics include Stokes’ theorem and the Gauss’ divergence theorem. Lecture, three hours; recitation, two hours per week. Prereq: MA 114 or MA 138 or equivalent.

  • MNG 201 - MINING ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS3

    Introduction to the fundamentals of mining engineering and the profession. Prospecting and exploration concepts introduced including ore reserve estimation techniques. Underground and surface mining methods will be studied with emphasis to applications to given deposit types and spatial constraints. General mine plan, sequence of development and cycle of operations for each method evaluated along with required auxilliary operations and equipment.

  • PHY 232 - GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS4

    A general course covering electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves and physical optics. Lecture, three hours; recitation, one hour per week.

    • Total18
Spring Semester
  • EES 230 - FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOLOGY I3

    Field and laboratory methods for identification and description of rocks and minerals with emphasis on sedimentary rocks and rock-forming minerals. Field study of geologic structures. Interpretation of geologic maps. Laboratory, three hours per week. Eight days in the field.

  • EM 302 - MECHANICS OF DEFORMABLE SOLIDS3

    A study of stress and strain in deformable solids with application primarily to linear elastic materials: stress and strain transformations; simple tension and compression of axial members; torsion of shafts; bending of beams; combined loading of members; buckling of columns.

  • MA 214 - CALCULUS IV3

    MA 214 is a course in ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is on first and second order equations and applications. The course includes series solutions of second order equations and Laplace transform methods.

  • ME 220 - ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS I3

    Fundamental principles of thermodynamics.

  • MNG 291 - ELEMENTS OF MINE DESIGN3

    Practical knowledge of computational tools used in mine design projects for both underground and surface mining, including a programming language and geology/mining modeling software. Geological and mining engineering modeling through the manipulation of software packages commonly used by mining engineers. Projects will cover the areas of surveying, geology, economics and mining.

  • MNG 303 - DEFORMABLE SOLIDS LABORATORY1

    Experimental studies of the mechanical properties of materials and structural elements. Laboratory, four hours per week for three-fourths of the semester.

  • MNG 331 - EXPLOSIVES AND BLASTING2

    Drilling and drill performance, types and properties of commercial explosives, initiation and priming, explosives selection, blast design, explosives applications, environmental effects, and safety and regulatory compliance.

    • Total18
    • Total Sophomore Hours36

Junior Year

Fall Semester
  • ME 330 - FLUID MECHANICS3

    Introduction to the physical properties of fluids, fluid statics. Equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy for systems and control volumes. Dimensional analysis and similarity. Principles of inviscid and real fluid flows including derivation and application of the Navier-Stokes equations. Flow through pipes and around bodies. Application and design of fluid handling systems.

  • MNG 211 - MINE SURVEYING2

    Surveying as applied to mining engineering, including the use and care of surveying instruments, measurement of horizontal and vertical distances, angles and direction, collection of ground and underground data for the design and layout of surface and underground mineral workings; and some aspects of the precise determination of position and direction for survey control.

  • MNG 301 - MINERALS PROCESSING3

    Principles and practices of mineral processing with emphasis on state- of-the-art separation technologies. Mineral deposits, sampling theory, slurry calculation, and particle motion in fluid streams. Unit operations for processing particulate materials. Crushing and grinding, screening, gravity separation, magnetic and electrostatic separation, froth flotation, dewatering and clarification. Flowsheets, process selection and plant performance evaluation.

  • MNG 302 - MINERALS PROCESSING LABORATORY1

    Application of principles studied in MNG 301. Laboratory, two hours.

  • MNG 335 - INTRODUCTION TO MINE SYSTEMS ANALYSIS3

    An introduction to probability, statistics, and statistical inferential reasoning. Probability distributions for discrete and continuous random variables; descriptive statistics and claims arising from them; construction and evaluation of claims arising from formal statistical inference conveyed in confidence intervals and hypothesis tests; analysis of variance; information literacy for statistical inferential reasoning. The course emphasizes mining applications.

  • MNG 351 - UNDERGROUND MINE DESIGN3

    Principles of underground excavations designs related to metallic, coal and industrial mineral deposits including underground mine layouts, stability of the underground excavations, material handling and drainage control. Underground mine planning and scheduling, equipment selection, and cost estimation.

  • Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities3
    • Total18
Spring Semester
  • MNG 311 - ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS AND MINING MACHINERY3

    A study of dc and ac electrical circuits, single-phase and three-phase circuits, transformers, and ac and dc rotating machinery used in the mining industry.

  • MNG 322 - MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AND PROCESSES2

    Mine Safety and Health Management and Processes, 2 cr. History and overview of mine health and safety; effective health and safety management systems; building a health and safety culture; hazard anticipation and identification, risk management and hazard control; Federal processes for health and safety system management; mine safety and health resources; mine laws, including safety regulations and interpretations for mining engineers and supervisors; and contemporary issues in mine safety.

  • MNG 371 - PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF MINING ENGINEERS3

    Development of professional skills important to the practice of mining engineering. Topics include written and oral communication skills, understanding ethical responsibility and appropriate ethical conduct, real world problem formulation and solution skills, exercise of abilities important to lifelong learning, knowledge of contemporary issues important to mining engineering. This course is a Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) course in certain programs, and hence is not likely to be eligible for automatic transfer credit to UK.

  • MNG 435 - MINE SYSTEMS ENGINEERING & ECONOMICS4

    Optimization of mining systems and investment decisions based on the time value of money and the application of deterministic and stochastic models. Application of advanced features in spread-sheet programming for solving mine systems problems.

  • MNG 463 - SURFACE MINE DESIGN3

    Principles of surface excavations designs related to quarries and mines; including orebody description, pit layouts and excess spoil disposal areas, stability of the slopes, material handling and surface drainage control. Surface mine planning and scheduling, equipment selection, cost estimating, optimization.

  • Mineral Processing Technical Elective3
    • Total18
    • Total Junior Hours36

Senior Year

Fall Semester
  • EM 313 - DYNAMICS3

    Study of the motion of bodies. Kinematics: cartesian and polar coordinate systems; normal and tangential components; translating and rotating reference frames. Kinetics of particles and rigid bodies: laws of motion; work and energy; impulse and momentum.

  • MNG 332 - MINE PLANT MACHINERY3

    Theory and practice of mine haulage, hoisting and drainage and pumping. Application of engineering principles to the analysis and selection of materials handling mediums for the minerals industry.

  • MNG 341 - MINE VENTILATION3

    Hazards of dust and gaseous contamination of mine atmosphere; air dilution requirements; flow distribution in mine network, computer analysis of the ventilation network, natural ventilation and fans. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, three hours.

  • MNG 551 - ROCK MECHANICS4

    Determination of the physical properties of rocks, rock mass classification, stress around mine openings, strain and displacement of the rock mass, rock reinforcement and support, stress interaction and subsidence, strata control. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours per week.

  • MNG 564 - ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN AND RECLAMATION3

    Introduction to the principles of sustainable mine planning with a focus on environmental control system design, reclamation and restoration design, and environmental monitoring systems. Topics will include culvert and diversion design, hydrologic inputs, catchment delineation and routing, sedimentologic inputs, erosion control and best management practice selection, sediment pond design, design of silt fences, grass filters, and sediment ditches, weep berm and vegetated filter strip design, reforestation, grassland/wildlife establishment, stream restoration, wetlands/vernal ponds, environmental monitoring system design, and community integration.

  • MNG 591 - MINE DESIGN PROJECT I1

    First course of a two-part capstone design project. Emphasis is on ore reserve evaluation, development of a preliminary mine plan, design of auxiliary processes, teamwork, and oral and written communication. Minable reserves will be quantified and quality distribution assessed. An appropriate mining technique will be identified and implemented into a proposed mine design. Laboratory, three hours per week.

    • Total17
Spring Semester
  • MNG 592 - MINE DESIGN PROJECT II3

    Students will undertake a major design project such as the overall design of a mining system, includinig design of major components of the system and economic evaluation. Students will write reports documenting this design, which will also be presented orally before a group of peers and invited experts. Lecture, two hours; lab, three hours.

  • Technical Elective3
  • Supportive Elective3
  • Community, Culture and Citizenship in the USA3
  • Global Dynamics3
    • Total15
    • Total Senior Hours32

Admission Requirements

Students may directly enroll as pre-engineering students; however, there are minimum admission requirements. Minimum freshman entry requirements are an ACT Math score of 23 or higher or an SAT Math score of 540 or higher. Additionally, students must also meet the minimum Kentucky statewide academic readiness requirements for reading and writing. If you do not meet the initial admission requirements, please refer to the University of Kentucky Bulletin for alternative routes to admission to the College of Engineering.


First-Year Engineering Program

The smartest, most talented engineers around the world are devoting themselves to tackling immense global challenges. As a First-Year Engineering (FYE) student, you get to join them!

In 2008, the National Academy of Engineering identified 14 “Grand Challenges for Engineering in the 21st Century”—opportunities to greatly increase humanity’s sustainability, health, security and joy of living. Themes include making solar energy economical, enhancing virtual reality, reverse-engineering the brain, securing cyberspace, providing access to clean water and more.

These ambitious goals demand engineers roll up their sleeves and get to work, which is why we put them front and center during your first year as an engineering student. We have designed the FYE program to inspire you. We want you to discover your passion. We want you to explore where you might make your unique contribution. We want you to get your hands dirty and make stuff that might, one day, lead to a breakthrough.

Why wait until you’re taking upper-level classes to figure out what interests you? Through real engineering classes taught by top faculty and exposure to engineering’s greatest challenges, the FYE program gets you into the game from day one.


Degree Requirements

The following curriculum meets the requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Mining Engineering, provided the student satisfies the graduation requirements of the College of Engineering.

 

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Meet the Faculty

Dr. Rick Honaker
Research Areas:  advanced physical processing, automation and control,
coal preparation, fine particle processing, mineral processing, and more

Dr. Braden Lusk
Research Areas: blast mitigation, blasting, explosives, mine operations
and management, public relations

Dr. Thomas Novak
Research Areas: mine power systems, automation and control,
mine safety, mineral economics

Dr. Zach Agioutantis
Research Areas: rock mechanics and geomechanics, subsidence
engineering, data management and analysis, computer cpplications in mining

Click here to meet more faculty! 


Experiential Education

The mining engineering program offers numerous opportunities to obtain hands-on experience through summer internships and co-operative education programs with mining companies that have operations throughout the U.S. These experiences often lead to full-time engineering professional positions upon graduation. For those interested in research, the program offers numerous undergraduate research opportunities in each of the specialized areas of mining engineering. Self-funding of all undergraduate education expenses is achievable by combining the funds earned from internship, co-op and research positions with the numerous scholarships that are available from the department and national societies and associations.

The Engineering Career Development Office is a valuable resource for assisting you with developing job, co-op and internship search skills; participating in education-abroad programs; participating in research endeavors and career network development so you can secure a rewarding career in your chosen field of study.


Student Involvement

Student organizations are an outgrowth of student interest and serve the needs of a variety of students. Many provide programs that supplement the classroom experience and extend into areas of service for the community. All provide learning and leadership training for participating students. Student organizations that are typically of interest to Mining Engineering students include: the Norwood Student Chapter of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME), the International Society of Explosives Engineers (ISEE), Women in Mining, and the Mu Nu Gamma Honor Society. Significant participation also occurs regionally and nationally with the professional societies through attendance and active participation at professional meetings that are held across the U.S.


Scholarship Opportunities

Mining Engineering students are automatically eligible for a Kentucky Mining Engineering Scholarship (KMES) which are awarded to freshmen on the basis of high school GPA and ACT scores and to upperclassmen on the basis of their UK cumulative GPA. Freshmen and sophomore students can receive up to $4,000 annually through the scholarship program while junior and senior students receive up to $6,000 annually. In addition, there are several scholarships available from the national societies.


Career Prospects in Mining Engineering

Retirements and growth in the mineral sector over the next 5 – 10 years are expected to create many openings for talented mining engineering graduates at annual salaries in the range of $60,000 to $72,000, which are among the highest of any B.S. graduate. As a result of the number of expected retirements, advancing up the career ladder is sure to be faster than most other professions. Opportunities in the mining engineering profession will always be available due to the need to provide resources for the nation and the world in a safe and environmentally-friendly manner.


Featured Career

Mining and Geological Engineers

Mining and geological engineers design mines to safely and efficiently remove minerals such as coal and metals for use in manufacturing and utilities.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Click the link for more info.

Median Salary

$90,160

per year in 2014

Number of Jobs

8,300

in 2014

10 Year Job Outlook

500

new jobs (average)

Work Environment

Mining engineers work mostly in mining operations in remote locations. However, some work in sand-and-gravel operations located near large cities.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Read More

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Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

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Contact

Dr. Joseph Sotille

Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies

Department of Mining Engineering

College of Engineering

Department of Mining Engineering

230 Mining and Mineral Resources Building

Lexington, KY 40506-0107

(859) 257-8026

Get more information about going to the University of Kentucky