Comparative Decision Making Studies

Analysis and Decision Support Tools

"Nothing is more difficult, and therefore more precious, than to be able to decide." -- Napoleon Bonaparte

Annual Conference - Posters

May 13-15, 2011
Lexington, KY

A poster session took place on Saturday, May 14th in Regency 3. The topics included, but were not limited, to experimental studies of judgment and decision-making scenarios, experimental approaches to individual and group behavior, the development of decision-making capacities, decision-making models in animal behavior, the effects of culture on decision-making strategies, neurobiological mechanisms of decision making, the discussion of relevant normative theories and decision-making applications to medicine, consumer behavior, law, and business.

 

The Poster Presentations (in alphabetical order)

 

1. A Biological Perspective on Parents as Decision-makers. David F. Westneat (presenter), Meg I. Hatch, Dan Wetzel, & Amanda L. Ensminger (Department of Biology, University of Kentucky).
David F. Westneat is a professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Kentucky. His research focuses on Behavioral Ecology and, specifically, on social and reproductive behavior in birds.
2. A cognitive principle of least effort explains many cognitive biases. Nisheeth Srivastava (absentee presenter), & Paul R. Schrater (Department of Computer Science, University of Minnesota).

3. A Decision-Theoretic Academic Advisor. Joshua T. Guerin (Department of Computer Science, University of Kentucky).

4. A Natural Language Argumentation Interface for Explanation Generation in Markov Decision Processes. Thomas Dodson, Nicholas Mattei (presenter), & Judy Goldsmith (Department of Computer Science, University of Kentucky).

5. Empirical Evaluation of Voting Results. Nicholas Mattei (Department of Computer Science, University of Kentucky).

6. Cat Markings (Social Rubbings) Trigger Defensive Behavior Comparable to Cat Collars in Several Sprague Dawleyrats. Matthew May (presenter) & William Timberlake (Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Bloomington, IN).
Matthew May is a graduating senior at Indiana University majoring in Neuroscience with minors in Chemistry and Animal Behavior. He is working with Dr. William Timberlake at Indiana University and with Dr. Iain McGregor at the University of Sydney on isolating and synthesizing the cat odor compound that causes anxiogenic behavior in rats.
7. Consumer response to product sampling at Kentucky farmers' markets. Sara Williamson (presenter), & Tim Woods (Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Kentucky).

8. Cortisol and Risk Tolerance. Kyle Fluegge (Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics & Clinical and Translational Science Epidemiology, The Ohio State University).

9. Decisions by Wolf Spiders and Carnivorous Plants. Ben Augustine (presenter, Department of Forestry, University of Kentucky), James Krupa (Department of Biology, University of Kentucky), James D. Harwood (Department of Entomology, University of Kentucky), & Philip H. Crowley (Department of Biology, University of Kentucky).

10. Gambling-Like Behavior in Pigeons: Effect of Level of Motivation for Food. Jennifer R. Laude (presenter), Kristina F. Pattison, & Thomas R. Zentall (Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky).

11. Investigation into Rational Choice: Optimism in the Market for Thoroughbred Yearlings. Kolter Kalberg (Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Kentucky).

12. Maladaptive Choice Behavior by Pigeons. Jessica P. Stagner (presenter), & Thomas R. Zentall (Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky).

13. Movement and Arousal Decisions by Healthy and Diseased Cave-Dwelling Bats During Hibernation. Sean Ehlman (presenter, Department of Biology, University of Kentucky), John J. Cox (Department of Forestry, University of Kentucky), & Philip H. Crowley (Department of Biology, University of Kentucky).

14. Reproductive Decisions: Finding the Best Blend of Sex and Asex. Christopher R. Stieha (presenter), Elizabeth D. Mattei, Jonathan Moore, & Philip H. Crowley (Department of Biology, University of Kentucky).

15. The Sunk Cost Fallacy in Pigeons. Kristina Pattison (presenter), & Thomas Zentall (Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky)
Kristina Pattison has been a member of the University of Kentucky Comparative Cognition Laboratory since 2008. After an initial career in the field of banking she worked as a professional dog behavior consultant and as a breeder of champion Belgian Tervuren. She attended Western Kentucky University (WKU) where she earned a bachelors degree in Psychology and then a master of arts in Experimental Psychology. At WKU she studied canine and human perception. Her work at UK has focused on researching dog behavior and cognition, and understanding the black box that we lovingly call the mind of a dog. She also works with pigeons and is studying risk-taking behavior, sunk cost, and social enrichment.
16. The Tragedy of the Commons in Plant Root Competition. Deric Miller, & Philip H. Crowley (Department of Department of Biology, University of Kentucky).

17. U.S. Consumers Preference for Country-of-Origin-Labeled Beef Steak and Food Safety Enhancements. Kar Ho Lim (presenter), Leigh Maynard, Wuyang Hu (Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Kentucky), & Ellan Goddard (Department of Rural Economy, University of Alberta).

18. Verdicts in Criminal Trials: Justice Approximated?  Sarah A. Crowley (presenter, Gross Belsky Alonso LLP, San Francisco), & Philip H. Crowley (Department of Biology, University of Kentucky).
 

19. Within-Session Reversal Learning in Pigeons and Rats.  Chelsea R. Kirk (presenter), Rebecca M. Rayburn-Reeves, Jessica P. Stagner, & Thomas R. Zentall (Department ofPsychology, University of Kentucky).
Chelsea Kirk has been a student of Dr. Thomas Zentall for two years. She graduated from the University of Kentucky on May 8th, 2011 with a Bachelor's Degree in Psychology and a Bachelor's Degree in Sociology. She will be attending the University of Western Ontario to pursue her Master's Degree in Psychology, with a concentration in Animal Cognition, under the guidance of Dr. Bill Roberts.