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  • students in an auditorium classroom viewed from the front, all of whom have apple laptops open on their laps. the image is heavily stylized with chiaroscuro contrasts between light and dark

    To unpack some of our assumptions about attention, learning, and technology in the classroom, I spoke with Dr. Yuha Jung and Dr. Rachel Shane of the Department of Arts Administration. Jung and Shane have worked with colleagues to integrate technologies into their teaching so that students are more likely to be on task. What follows is an informal exploration of what it means to pay attention and to learn in the context of the contested value of digital technologies.

  • still life of a desk with an open book, a clock, an empty bottle, and a candle burning in a lantern, with high contrast between light and dark as if it were night

    In The Slow Professor, Maggie Berg and Barbara K. Seeber's thoughtful contribution to the conversation on academic labor is to challenge what often goes without saying: that it's good to be more efficient, to be faster, to manage as many tasks as possible at once. How can we practice slowness and pleasure in thoughtful ways for the good of our disciplines and colleagues and, more importantly, for those whom our decisions and actions affect profoundly?

  • hand drawn concept map of the principles of universal design for learning

    Dr. Deb Castiglione is the Universal Design and Instructional Technology Specialist at CELT. She has worked to get a campus-wide license at the University of Kentucky for the software Read&Write Gold, which follows principles of universal design for learning. We asked Dr. Castiglione about what the software can do for learners, and why we should think more about inclusive practices such as universal design in our teaching.