News & Events

Hummingbird Nano Inc. Highlighted in National Report by The Science Coalition


LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 29, 2013) — A University of Kentucky spin-off company is among those highlighted in a new national report released today by The Science Coalition.
 
Hummingbird Nano Inc., a high-tech startup based at UK's Coldstream Research Campus, is featured in “Sparking Economic Growth 2.0: Companies Created from Federally Funded Research, Fueling American Innovation and Economic Growth.” The report identifies 100 companies that trace their roots to federally funded university research. These companies, while only a tiny fraction of the new companies formed each year, are contributing to the U.S. economy in a significant way.
 
"Every dollar of federal funds that is invested in research returns many dollars more, both in terms of immediate economic activity and in long-term dividends," said James W. Tracy, UK vice president for research. "It is critical to the economic health of Kentucky, and of the United States, that our nation continues to invest strongly in the basic research that leads to innovation and job creation."
 
In fiscal year 2013, external research grants and contracts contributed $367.1 million to the Kentucky economy, including $194.4 million in personal income. Externally supported research accounted for 9,427 jobs at UK and throughout Kentucky. Each dollar of out-of-state external funding for research generates approximately $1.90 of total related expenditures.
 
The basic scientific research that gives rise to companies like Hummingbird Nano, and spurs the economy in many other ways, is jeopardized by the current funding environment, Tracy said. Federal funding for research and development has been on a downward trend for the past decade, with funding levels in 2013 at historic lows. 
 
Sequestration, which began in March 2013, is set to run through 2021 and will wring an additional $95 billion from federal research budgets over this period. This national disinvestment in science will have real consequences. As the Sparking Economic Growth 2.0 companies illustrate, research and the transformative discoveries that flow from it often require sustained funding over many years to yield results.
 
Hummingbird Nano is an example. The initial research that led to the company's founding was undertaken at UK with approximately $300,000 in funding from the National Science Foundation and the Department of Education. From 2000-2007, researchers worked to develop a new manufacturing system that maintains extreme tolerances and precision to mass produce micro-sized molded plastic and glass parts. The technology was further developed for commercialization for another five years, from 2007-2012, under the auspices of Hummingbird's predecessor company, AMT Nano LLC.
 
The September 2012 launch of Hummingbird Nano signaled a transition from research and development to a commercial enterprise centered on precision-molded components for the telecommunications, biotechnology, aerospace, energy and defense industries.
 
“The basic research into the limitations of existing machinery revealed the direction for new processes and machines," said L. Scott Stephens, chair of the UK Department of Mechanical Engineering and Hummingbird co-founder. "The result is a manufacturing system for the mass production of micro-sized parts and assemblies with unparalleled precision. Our technology enables products that could not be produced economically before to be produced in quantities exceeding 100 million annually."
 
University research and the companies born from such research are a driving force behind much of the innovation in the United States. They are bringing forward innovations with the potential to transform industries and solve some of the world’s greatest problems. Since industry conducts relatively little basic research today (about 20 percent), the “seed corn” produced at research universities is essential to U.S. industry and its ability to compete.
 
Research universities like UK play an important role in the creation and future success of spin-off companies, providing a nurturing environment and critical assistance to researcher-entrepreneurs aiming to bring research discoveries to the marketplace. 
 
"UK has successfully fostered new companies and emerging technologies through our business incubator the Advanced Science & Technology Commercialization Center, better known as ASTeCC," Tracy said.
 
Forty-three companies have "graduated" from ASTeCC since 1994. For companies that have outgrown ASTeCC, UK subleases larger laboratory and office spaces or assists with identifying available locations for lease in privately owned buildings at the Coldstream Research Campus. Hummingbird Nano is just one of 66 organizations at Coldstream, where more than 2,000 employees work in biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, equine health and a variety of other industry sectors.
 
The Science Coalition is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization of more than 50 of the nation’s leading public and private research universities, including UK. It is dedicated to sustaining the federal government’s investment in basic scientific research as a means to stimulate the economy, spur innovation and drive America’s global competitiveness.
 
The new Science Coalition report is available at www.sciencecoalition.org/successstories. An accompanying database provides access to company profiles and allows users to sort companies by federal funding agency, university affiliation, type of innovation and other criteria. 
 
MEDIA CONTACT: Keith Hautala, 859-323-2396; keith.hautala@uky.edu

ARPA-E Announces $608,863 Award to Phinx LLC for its Transformational Energy Research Project


Phinix LLC One of 33 Technologies in 18 States Working to Secure America’s Energy Future in Advanced Manufacturing  
 
Lexington, KY (October 9, 2013) — On September 19, 2013, Deputy Director Cheryl Martin announced that 33 breakthrough energy projects will receive approximately $66 million from the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) under two new programs that provide options for a more sustainable and secure American future.  One recipient, Lexington, KY based Phinix, LLC, has been awarded $608,863 for their project titled “Electrochemical Extraction of High Quality Magnesium from Scrap”. Phinix is located at the Coldstream Research Campus.
 
Phinix will develop a new electrochemical cell technology that can recover high-quality magnesium from aluminum-magnesium scrap.  This technology could lower costs, energy inputs, and emissions from magnesium production, expanding its use in transportation industries.  By recovering and reusing aluminum-magnesium scrap, Phinix’s technology could reduce the need for manufacturing new, expensive primary metals while developing a sustainable and low-cost advanced manufacturing process. 
 
Processing of aluminum-magnesium scarp to produce aluminum products used in beverage and transportation sectors is a key market driver for Kentucky’s economically significant aluminum industry employing over 15,000 men and women with high paying jobs.  
 
Deputy Director Martin made the project announcement during a roundtable discussion on Capitol Hill that focused on how American ingenuity and strategic public-private partnerships are driving U.S. energy innovation. 
 
Dr. Subodh Das will the Principal Investigator for this project. 
 
Contact:
Dr. Subodh Das, CEO and Founder
Phinix, LLC
859-619-8386 
 

Coldstream Laboratories Awarded 5-Year Contract With the National Cancer Institute


Marketwired - Sep 24, 2013 - Coldstream Laboratories, Inc., a provider of sterile drug product development and manufacturing services, has announced that they have been awarded a 5-year contract with the National Cancer Institute ("NCI") under solicitation number N02CM37007-11 (contract# HHSN261201300031I) entitled "Development and Production of Parenteral Dosage Forms for Clinical Studies."
 
The contract lasts for five years with the objective of developing and producing pharmaceutically acceptable parenteral dosage forms of cancer drugs for human use. Certain lead agents selected by the NCI will be assigned for development and production as parenteral products. The NCI has been a leader in field of cancer research since its establishment in 1937.
 
"The requirements for this program mesh perfectly with Coldstream's capabilities and facilities. We couldn't be more pleased to be awarded this opportunity to work with the NCI," said Eric W. Smart, Coldstream's President and Chief Executive Officer. "We work hard to ensure the highest degree of quality in everything we do and being awarded this contract indicates that we are succeeding. Being awarded this contract affords Coldstream the opportunity to continue to make an impact in the field of cancer research and help advance oncologic care for the millions of people impacted by cancer every year."
 
Coldstream Laboratories, Inc., based in Lexington, KY, is a privately held specialty pharmaceutical contract manufacturing organization. The company was formed in 2007 as a spin-off from the University of Kentucky's Center for Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology. Coldstream operates Kentucky's only parenteral manufacturing facility.

Federal Grants Crucial in Funding Innovations that Strengthen KY


Published September 16, 2013 in the Lexington Herald-Leader
By George Ward
 
In his recent op-ed, Eli Capilouto, president of the University of Kentucky, gave a high-level explanation of the need for continued federal research funding and the impact that this funding has on research institutions and the communities where they reside.
 
In order for America to continue to play a leading role in the development of useful technologies and new products that make our lives better, the "innovation deficit" created by declining federal research funding and sequestration must be addressed.
 
In my position as executive director of the Coldstream Research Campus and working with Central Kentucky's technology-based economic development professionals, I see firsthand on a daily basis how the investment in research has changed Lexington's business mix, tax base and our community.
 
Whether UK recruits another world-class scientist (maybe with a spouse or significant other with similar advanced degree credentials) or an entrepreneurial faculty member starts a company and hires young, well-educated, well-paid employees, Lexington benefits from the "brain gain." Lexington also benefits as these folks volunteer for civic boards or take advantage of the many social and cultural opportunities in our city.
 
Of the 66 total businesses and organizations at Coldstream, more than half are in life sciences, engineering or animal health. There are an additional 19 companies growing in UK's high-tech business incubator, the Advanced Science and Technology Commercialization Center, also known as ASTeCC, creating a pipeline of companies with the opportunity to create innovative new products and grow well-paying jobs.
 
In all, ASTeCC has produced 43 companies that have graduated from the incubator facility and were either purchased by larger companies, or continue to grow, many in the Lexington area.
 
The typical evolution of these high-tech companies starts with millions of federal research dollars on basic research to advance science in a particular area. As an idea develops, innovative faculty members patent their ideas and then license them to a company, some started by entrepreneurial faculty members those who have received doctorates. Many of these companies are then funded by federal small business innovation research grants. Using these grants, companies develop working prototypes of new products and then go on to seek private investment to commercialize their ideas.
 
Since March 2007, the federal government has awarded 33 small businesses in Fayette County over $28 million from this program with an additional $18 million from a Kentucky matching program. Twelve of these companies were attracted to Central Kentucky from out of state to qualify for state matching grants and to be close to UK researchers and resources.
 
Much of this money is then spent in our community on salaries, building rents and other operating expenses. These salaries then turn over in our community at retail stores, restaurants, housing, entertainment or arts venues, etc.
 
The May 2013 McKinsey Global Institute report, "Disruptive technologies: Advances that will transform life, business, and the global economy," said technologies including advanced robotics, next-generation genomics, 3-D printing, energy storage and advanced materials are among the top 12 technologies that have the greatest economic potential in the next 12 years.
 
New products being developed in Central Kentucky include treatments for cancer, methods of drug delivery, business solutions using 3-D imaging, longer-life and less expensive batteries for mobile devices and electric vehicles, cost-effective manufacturing of prototype products, advanced materials including lighter weight metals used in automobile and aerospace manufacturing, and many others.
 
All this and more is happening every day at UK, the Coldstream Research Campus, ASTeCC and other areas of our city. It all started with basic research investment by the federal government. It has led to brain gain, innovative new products and a growing, well-educated community. The need to fund innovation is very apparent in Lexington and it is important that Congress helps prevent an innovation deficit from occurring.
 
With appropriate funding, UK researchers and private companies founded by entrepreneurial faculty will create new technologies that will lead to a more sustainable way of life, well-paying jobs and economic prosperity for our community and country.
 
At issue: Aug. 25 commentary by Eli Capilouto, "Research investment drives progress; cuts in public grants threaten growth"
 
George Ward is executive director of Coldstream Research Campus.
 

Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Held for New Eastern State Hospital


Eastern State HospitalLEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 4, 2013) – Governor Steve Beshear joined local leaders, state officials and representatives from University of Kentucky and UK HealthCare for a ribbon-cutting at the new Eastern State Hospital facility. The new hospital is located at UK’s Coldstream Research Campus in Lexington and will open this month. 
 
The 239-bed, approximately 300,000-square-foot replacement facility will provide a modern setting for inpatient psychiatric treatment, along with specialized services for individuals with acquired brain injuries, and individuals with psychiatric disabilities requiring nursing facility level of care and forensic mental health services.
 
In addition to the inpatient hospital, the new Eastern State Hospital campus will include three 11,000-square-foot personal care homes, each with 16 beds, offering a less restrictive level of care that promotes patients’ return to a community setting. These personal care homes will provide residential psychiatric services and serve as a step down from the acute care setting.
 
“To see this project come to fruition is truly rewarding,” said Gov. Beshear. “The improvements in how Kentucky cares for individuals with mental health needs as a result of the new hospital should make us all proud.”
 
The $129 million facility replaces the 185-year-old Eastern State Hospital, the second oldest psychiatric hospital in the country. It will be managed and operated by UK HealthCare, through an agreement with the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS). This new partnership will not only maintain and improve quality patient care, but also allows UK to leverage its considerable expertise in research and clinical therapies to modernize treatment options while training the next generation of behavioral health providers.
 
Gov. Beshear was joined at today’s ceremony by Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, State Representative Jimmie Lee, of Elizabethtown, University of Kentucky President Dr. Eli Capilouto, Executive Vice President for Health Affairs for UK Dr. Michael Karpf and CHFS Secretary Audrey Tayse Haynes.
 
“Today we take a giant step forward,” Mayor Gray said. “From facilities built before the Civil War and into a modern, state-of-the-art facility; from the nation’s second oldest psychiatric hospital to one of its most advanced. It is a big step of progress for all Kentuckians, but especially for those who suffer from mental disabilities. Many of these patients and their families have been waiting for decades for this day. Gratitude and thanks and blessings to everyone involved.”
 
“This is a real happening for me,” said Rep. Lee. “I cannot put into words what this facility means to me and what the support services offered here will mean for literally thousands of our citizens needing mental health care.”
 
“Today is a day to celebrate a partnership in care for many of Kentucky’s most vulnerable citizens," said President Capilouto. “With a state-of-the-art facility financed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the best in high-quality, high-touch expertise and care from UK HealthCare, we begin a new day in providing the best mental health care for the region we serve.”
 
“UK HealthCare recognizes the critical role mental health services plays in providing for the overall health care needs of Kentuckians,” said Dr. Karpf. “This new state-of-the-art facility will enable us to provide the highest level of care as well recruit and retain researchers who will advance our knowledge of the prevention, early detection and treatment of behavioral health disorders.”
 
The Eastern State Hospital project involves a unique agreement between UK, Bluegrass Community and Technical College (BCTC), the state and the city of Lexington. Under the agreement, Eastern State moves from its campus on Newtown Pike to the Coldstream Research Campus location; BCTC moves from UK’s Lexington campus to the current Eastern State location; and UK takes over BCTC’s location on Cooper Drive, which provides the university with additional parking.
 
Construction on the facility began in late 2010 and was overseen by D.W. Wilburn, construction manager for the replacement project. The facility is Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certified, meaning it meets the highest green building and performance measures.
 
“This facility will offer us the ability to provide improved and expanded services to better meet patient needs,” said CHFS Secretary Haynes. “The advances we’ll be making in patient treatment simply cannot be overstated. I would like to extend my gratitude to everyone who has worked so tirelessly to make the new Eastern State Hospital a reality, and to our new partners UK HealthCare, who I know will continue to work hard every day to provide the best patient care possible.”
 
Eastern State Hospital serves an average of 2,000 patients per year from 80 Kentucky counties. The primary counties served include Boyle, Fayette, Franklin, Kenton and Madison, ranging from 65 to 279 patients annually.
 
Media Contacts:  
Kerri Richardson, Governor's Office, 502-564-2611 or 502-330-6633
or Kristi Lopez, UK, 850-806-0445

Medicinal Power of Blackberries Now Available in KY Proud Gum


Note: Four Tigers, LLC, located on the Coldstream Research Campus, was established in 2004 to develop botanical health and medical products derived from blackberries. Four Tigers is developing a pipeline of blackberry-based health products that will be marketed as cosmetics, dietary supplements, and foods. The company is also developing an exciting portfolio of medical products harnessing the potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of blackberries.
 
August 26, 2013 
 
By Cheryl Truman, Lexington Herald-Leader
 
Paige Shumate Short twirls the raw blackberry in her fingers. Here, she said, is a powerhouse of berry power: antiviral, antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, cancer-suppressing and wound-healing.
 
Her Four Tigers berry care company started with the blackberries produced on Windstone Farms, just east of Paris, by her late father, Wayne Shumate.
 
One day, Short was passing a TV in her den and saw a report about University of Kentucky researchers working with black raspberries.
 
Nonsense, she thought: Why not blackberries?
 
That's how the research relationship got started between Short and her business partner, Russell Mumper, the vice dean of the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Mumper previously worked for the University of Kentucky, where his primary research work was in nanotechnology, the process of manipulating atoms and molecules to create microminiature equipment.
 
Since June, Short's company has begun stocking its debut product, gums — BerryCare Toothpaste Gum and BerryCare's Quick Energy Gum — at regional Kroger stores. The toothpaste gum contains 50 milligrams of blackberry powder with its associated polyphenols — chemicals that affect cell-to-cell signaling, inflammatory enzyme activity or gene regulation. That's about as much polyphenol as in nearly a cup of blackberries, Short said.
 
The gums apparently are the first chewing products to be certified Kentucky Proud — which involves products being grown, processed and manufactured in Kentucky.
 
The Shumate-Short clan is doing well with its blackberries, said Kristin Branscum, executive director of the office of marketing for the Kentucky agriculture department, but they're the only ones marketing fruit with healthy antioxidant properties.
 
"Our blueberry growers down in Metcalfe County are really doing a bang-up job," Branscum said. The growers are selling seeds, plants, fruit, books and gift items. For more information on the Kentucky Blueberry Growers Association, go to Blueberrygrowers.com.
 
The blackberry BerryCare energy gum contains 40 milligrams of caffeine in addition to its blackberry powder.
 
However, that's just the beginning of the possibilities forecast for blackberries by Short and her son Bryan Shumate Short, who helps her run the business, headquartered at the Coldstream Research Campus.
 
She and her pharmacy specialist, Joshua Eldridge, are looking beyond gum into other ways to deliver those blackberry phenols, by lozenge or by a tiny film the size of a contact lens that dissolves in the mouth.
 
In the future, Short envisions cosmetics and skin-care products that capitalize on the natural sunscreen in blackberries. Her company also wants to figure out what to do with the seeds that are left over after the blackberries are pureed. Stalks from blackberry plants can be used for fiber that's similar to hemp, Short said.
 
Blackberries are picked or bought from other growers and brought to the research park laboratory and office to be processed. A freezer gives off the smell of a field of frozen blackberries, pureed and frozen; when it's time to process the blackberries, they are moved to a nearby refrigerator.
 
In a world obsessed with healthful living, fruits are often marketed for their health benefits in an increasingly crowded market: Just flipping through the October 2013 issue of Psychology Today yields an article on the health benefits of cranberries headlined "The Smart of Tart" for their ability to stop age-related decline in memory. A few pages later the yuzu — a fruit that looks like the mating of an orange with a cauliflower — is touted as possibly the next superfruit for its benefits to brain neurons and its antioxidant whammy.
 
Four Tigers is seeking FDA approval to test an oral care product with a higher concentration of blackberry powder at the University of Kentucky. If approved for sale as a botanical drug, the blackberry product would be only the second botanical drug in history. The first was green tea, which has a lukewarm approval from the FDA, which says that it might reduce the risk of breast or prostate cancer, although "the FDA has concluded that there is very little scientific evidence for this claim."
 
The Shumates and Shorts have an extensive manufacturing history in Central Kentucky. Paige Shumate Short's father, who died in 2005, turned a hobby blackberry farm into Windstone Farms, the largest blackberry operation east of the Mississippi.
 
Shumate also was the man behind Blue Grass Industries, which would later become Kentucky Textiles Inc., which made Speedo swimwear in Paris.
 
"There's a little part of him in it," Shumate Short said of her father's legacy to her blackberry business. "We still believe the way he did — that there's opportunities in blackberries."
 
Kentucky Proud
 
Four Tigers LLC blackberry-derived products
 
 
Phone: (859) 509-0170
 
 
 

Lexington-Based Fluid Management Systems Granted U.S. Patent Tracking Injected Meds


FMS logoJuly 25, 2013 - Fluid Management Systems Inc., a local high-tech entrepreneurial company located at the Coldstream Research Campus, was granted a utility patent (US Patent No. 8,467,981) by United States Patent and Trademark Office. The patent is for a proprietary system managing inventory through a non-invasive measurement process. Additionally, USPTO has also approved a trademark – VETrakTM – for commercial applications.

 

FMS has several provisional and utility patents applications in the pipeline for human and animal health applications.

 
The measurement system developed by FMS is envisioned as a system for tracking injectable medications administered at hospitals, clinics and doctors’ offices. The technology resulting from this vision is highly adaptable and the first iteration of the vision rests with the animal health market.
 

Dr. Somnath Mukherjee and Ajay Das, both Co-founders of FMS, are the named inventors of the issued utility patent.
 
During 35 years of experience as an industry executive, academic and entrepreneur, Das has created and managed six research consortia and high-tech companies. He founded and served as the CEO of Secat Inc., was director for the Center for Aluminum Technology, was executive director for the Sloan Industry “Center for a Sustainable Aluminum Industry” and adjunct professor of Materials Engineering, all at the University of Kentucky. He is also the founder and CEO of Lexington-based aluminum and energy consulting firm, Phinix, LLC.
 
FMS is currently implementing commercial VETrakTM units at swine farms in Illinois and Iowa. FMS is also under discussions with Lexington-based equine and pharma manufacturing companies to expand its applicability to other animal farms and human health.
 
For more information, click here or e-mail Dr. Subodh Das at subodh@fluidmanagementsystem.com He can also be reached at 859-619-8386.

Construction begins on Citation Boulevard Extension


Connects the Coldstream Research Campus with Commercial and Residential Real Estate Development in Lexington’s Northside

 

Citation Boulevard, a four-lane road that bisects the UK Coldstream Research Campus, will be extended 2.45 miles west from Jaggie Fox Way to Leestown Road at Alexandria Drive. The project will connect the Coldstream Research Campus to commercial developments along Mercer Road and Buck Lane, as well as both commercial and residential developments off Leestown Road. Construction is expect to be completed in December 2015.

 

According to the Lexington Herald Leader, construction crews have been clearing trees around Greendale Road, Buck Lane and Mercer Road to make way for Citation since June. The construction comes after years of rapid residential growth in the northwestern quadrant of the city, which was mostly farmland 15 to 20 years ago. City officials said they hoped the road extension would bring more retail businesses to the underserved area.

 

“Coldstream tenants frequently ask me when there will be more restaurant or retail store development in this part of town,”said George Ward, Executive Director of the Coldstream Research Campus. “The Citation extension is key to generating demand because restaurants typically look at population demographics in a three-mile radius. The Citation extension will provide easy access to Newtown Pike and Citation commercial lots to thousands of people living in single-family homes off Leestown Road.”

 

The first phase of Citation, connecting Newtown Pike to Georgetown Road, was completed in the late 1990s.

 

Citation Blvd

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Law Firm Bingham McCutchen Partners With UK Institute for Workplace Innovation


LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 19, 2013) ―
Bingham McCutchen LLC has joined forces with the University of Kentucky Institute for Workplace Innovation (iwin) to become its newest Innovative Employer Roundtable Partner.  By becoming a Partner of iwin’s, Bingham joins an invitation-only, premier learning community of Kentucky’s top companies dedicated to instituting innovative workplace practices and becoming employers-of-choice.
 
A workplace consulting and research institute, iwin translates research on organizational effectiveness and business best practices, creates applied tools and resources, and helps employers successfully develop their workforces.
 
“Bingham is delighted to be a Roundtable Partner,” said Tracee Whitley, Bingham’s chief operating officer. “Our executive team works diligently to develop innovative employee practices that support our team and enhance our culture. We look forward to the opportunity to network with our dynamic Partners to share ideas in continuing to create innovative workplace practices.”
 
Bingham’s Global Services Center, based at the UK Coldstream Research Campus, opened in April 2013. It houses administrative support staff positions including finance and accounting, human resources, information technology, knowledge services, marketing, operations, and risk management.
 
 “As a leading global law firm, Bingham brings extensive knowledge and proven best practices in employee engagement,” said Lisa Williams, executive director of iwin. “iwin’s initiatives and peer-to-peer learning opportunities can be a strong catalyst for new innovations in Bingham’s ongoing employee-centered environment.”
 
The Innovative Employer Roundtable at iwin continues to grow and spans the Commonwealth. Current Partners include 3M; Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield; Baptist Health Lexington; Bingham; Brown-Forman; Central Bank; Commonwealth of Kentucky; Community Action Council; Community Trust Bank, Inc.; Computer Services, Inc.; CVS Caremark; Darley America; Dean Dorton Allen Ford, PLLC; Dinsmore & Shohl, LLP; EKCEP: Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program; EQT Corporation; Fazoli’s Restaurants; Gallatin Steel; General Cable; Gray Construction; Harper Industries; Hilliard Lyons; Innovative Mattress Solutions; KEMI: Kentucky Employers’ Mutual Insurance; KentuckyOne Health; LG&E and KU Energy; Logan Aluminum; Neace Lukens; Owensboro Medical Health System; Paducah & Louisville Railway, Inc.; Papa John’s International, Inc.; Perfetti Van Melle U.S.A, Inc.; R.J. Corman; Sturgill, Turner, Barker & Moloney, PLLC; Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing, NA; University of Kentucky; University of Kentucky Federal Credit Union; and University of Kentucky HealthCare.
 
In order to create an optimal networking and learning environment in which business leaders can connect with innovative-minded colleagues, membership will cap at 50 employers.
 
To become a Partner of the UK iwin Innovative Employer Roundtable or to learn more about iwin’s consulting services and research, contact shannon.holbrook@uky.edu or call 859-323-0581. For more information, visit www.iwin.uky.edu.
 
With 1,000 lawyers in 14 offices in the United States, Europe, and Asia, Bingham, focuses on financial services firms and Fortune 100 companies, operating on an interconnected platform aligned to address a wide range of legal issues worldwide.
 
The University of Kentucky’s Institute for Workplace Innovation’s mission is to develop and disseminate knowledge about the 21st century workplace to create work environments that boost the bottom line, employee health, and work-life effectiveness.
 
  
MEDIA CONTACTS:  Shannon Holbrook, iwin, 859-323-0581 or Kathy Johnson, UKPR, 257-3155

KDC Proposes Corporate Center at UK's Coldstream Research Campus


Phase one would be a three-story 100,000 sf LEED Certified Class A office building
 
LEXINGTON, KY – May 29, 2013 –  KDC, one of America’s leading commercial real estate and investment firms, under sub-contract with Sperry Van Ness Real Estate Advisors – Lexington, is marketing for development a 38-acre, 250,000 square foot  KDC Corporate Center at the University of Kentucky’s Coldstream Research Campus, one of the larger research campuses in the country.  
 
Phase one is planned to include a three-story, 100,000 square foot LEED Certified building modeled after a highly efficient, sustainable and cost effective prototypical design that KDC has successfully utilized around the country with many of their corporate clients.  Construction of phase one will commence when pre-leasing reaches 50% occupancy.
 
“The proposed building will set the standard for regional and national corporate office facilities in Kentucky,” said KDC‘s Jeff Stidham.  “Its innovative design results in operational savings and provides a healthy work environment that increases employee productivity.”
 
The planned building features a floor design that accommodates more employees per square foot, with raised access flooring for easy access to route electrical, phone and data cabling. Large floor plates with under-floor air distribution providing work stations with individual HVAC controls for temperature adjustment. The under-floor system saves approximately 30 percent in energy costs and improves air quality.  Other building attributes include improved lighting and acoustic quality, ease of transitioning interior components and increased day-lighting opportunities.
 
KDC’s Corporate Center building is designed to receive LEED-certification.  This “green” building rating system, implemented by the U.S. Green Building Council, promotes buildings that are environmentally responsible, profitable and healthy places to live and work. 
 
“I am excited that KDC has taken an interest in marketing their Corporate Center design on the Coldstream Research Campus,” said George Ward, Executive Director of Coldstream. “Their involvement will show a national audience why companies like Hewlett Packard, Tempur-Pedic, A & W Restaurants, Allconnect, and Bingham McCutchen call Coldstream home.
 
The 735-acre Coldstream Research Campus, located at the intersection of I-64 and I-75, is only minutes from the University of Kentucky and downtown Lexington. The research campus, once a well-known Kentucky horse farm, now houses more than 62 companies and 1,360 people that work in the biotech, pharmaceutical, equine health and service industries.    
 
The Coldstream campus offers amenities including a 225-acre city park, two dog parks, and a 1.8 mile section of Lexington’s 12-mile running and bicycling trail that connects downtown Lexington to the Kentucky Horse Park.   An Embassy Suites Hotel, the Paddock Grille Restaurant, and a new hospital also are on the campus. 
 
About KDC
KDC, one of America’s leading commercial real estate and investment companies, provides a full range of commercial real estate services including corporate build-to-suit development, acquisitions, corporate facility project/construction management, project financing, asset and land management, and marketing and leasing. KDC is headquartered in Dallas and has offices in Austin, Texas; Charlotte, N.C.; Lexington, KY; and Detroit. For more information, visit kdc.com
 
 
For more information, contact Sydney Townsend at stownsend@sunwestpr.com or (214) 373-1601, or Maggie Turner at mturner@sunwestpr.com or (972) 979-9351 at Sunwest Communications.

 

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