Search Login University of Kentucky




Curated Content  »  Events

The 6th Annual Historic Preservation Symposium - New Voices, Current Needs

March 2, 2012, 10am
215 W. Main St., Lexington, KY 40507 (map it)

Ned Kaufman - Founder of Place Matters and of Pratt Institute's graduate program in Historic Preservation

Alicestyne Turley - Assistant Professor in the Pan African Studies Department at the University of Louisville, and is the Director of the Underground Railroad Research Institute

Thomas F. King - One of the nation’s foremost authorities on archaeological policy and cultural resource management law.

Stanley Lowe - President and Chief Executive Officer of Pittsburgh Neighborhood Preservation Services

The University of Kentucky College of Design will host its sixth annual historic preservation symposium, "New Voices, Current Needs," an exploration of how preservation can address the needs of underserved communities and help correct modern and historical injustices. The free public symposium will be presented March 1 and 2, at the Lexington History Museum, located at 215 W. Main St. in downtown Lexington.

"One way of exploring the relationship between historic preservation and social justice is to recognize that preservation plays a major role in determining what pieces of the past will be available for study or use in the future," says Douglas Appler, the Helen Edwards Abell Endowed Chair in Historic Preservation at the College of Design. "If the history of a particular group is wiped from the landscape, its past can't be explored or recognized to the same degree as that of another group whose history is left in place and remains standing. Historic Preservation once focused very narrowly on the stories of wealthy individuals, on grand architecture, and on presenting an uncritical view of history. Fortunately, preservationists today are doing a better job of using the built environment to present a more complete account of the past."

Appler adds, "Historic preservation professionals can also help ensure access to quality housing for some of society's most vulnerable members. For example, the Historic Preservation Tax Credit is commonly paired with Low Income Housing Tax Credits to generate projects that provide clean, safe, affordable housing for low-income individuals and families. 

"New Voices, Current Needs" will feature four speakers who will explore current needs in historic preservation. The symposium speakers, in order of scheduled appearance, are:

March 1 
10:00 AM / Ned Kaufman - the Bluegrass Trust for Historic Preservation Lecture
 
Founder of Place Matters and of Pratt Institute's graduate program in Historic Preservation. His most recent book, Place, Race and Story provides critical reflection on future directions for the historic preservation movement, focusing on the future role of meaning in historic preservation efforts.

2:00 PM / Alicestyne Turley- the Clyde R. Carpenter Lecture
Assistant Professor in the Pan African Studies Department at the University of Louisville, and is the Director of the Underground Railroad Research Institute. Dr. Turley is also a member of the City of Louisville Historic Landmarks and Preservation Districts Commission.

March 2
10:00 AM / Thomas F. King - the CRA/Cultural Resource Analysts Inc. Lecture

Thomas King is one of the nation’s foremost authorities on archaeological policy and cultural resource management law. He has authored many books, including Cultural Resource Laws and Practice, and Places that Count: Traditional Cultural Properties in Cultural Resource Management.

2:00 PM / Stanley Lowe - the Morgan Worldwide Lecture
Stanley Lowe is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Pittsburgh Neighborhood Preservation Services. He is also the former Executive Director of the City of Pittsburgh Housing Authority, was the Vice President of the Neighborhood Revitalization Department of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and has worked for years to channel energy, attention and resources toward economic development in low income urban neighborhoods.

Lectures are free and open to the public.
Each lecture will be followed by a local response panel and audience Q&A.
AIA Health Safety and Welfare (HSW) Continuing Education Credit are available.
 

The Annual Historic Preservation Symposium is the premier public discussion venue for historic preservation issues in the region.  To help make the event a resounding success we need support from people like you. To make an online donation please see the link below.

 

 

Organized by the College of Design and the Historic Preservation Graduate Organization of the University of Kentucky.