Withdrawal

Withdrawing from all courses or quitting:

Federal financial aid recipients who withdraw from the semester before 60 percent of the term is completed are subject to Return to Title IV regulations. These regulations view aid as a resource for the entire term; aid is earned for the number of days attended, but unearned for the days that will be missed due to withdrawal. Unearned aid must be returned to the appropriate aid programs. Determine the percentage of earned aid by dividing the number of days attended by the number of days in the semester. (When the earned aid is 60 per cent or greater, without rounding, then federal aid is not returned.) Subtract the earned aid percentage from 100 per cent for the unearned percentage. Multiply the unearned percentage by the charges for tuition and fees, room and board on the student's account. The result is approximately the amount of aid that will be returned to federal aid programs. Loans are refunded before grants. To find out the exact amount for you, please contact the Student Financial Aid Office.

Example:
A sophomore withdraws three weeks into the semester. She was charged full-time in-state undergraduate tuition of $3,548. A $2,250 subsidized Direct Loan paid the majority of charges; she paid the remainder from savings and has a $0 balance on her student account on the day of withdrawal. There are 109 days in the semester; she attended 23.

  • Percentage of earned aid = 23/109 = 21.1% earned.
   
  • Unearned aid = 100% - 21.1% (earned) = 78.9% unearned.
   
  • $2,250 (aid received) X 21.1% = $474.75 earned.
   
  • $2,250 - $474.75 = $1,775.25 unearned.
   
  • Amount of Aid to be Returned by School = Institutional charges times unearned percentage; $3,548 X 78.9% = $2,799.37.
  • Since $2,799.37 exceeds the amount of unearned aid, the lesser number is used. $1,775 of the subsidized Direct Loan disbursement would be reversed from her student account. The loan debt is reduced but since the tuition refund was $1,774, the student owes the university $1.00. ($1,774- $1,775 = $-1.00.)

Return to Title IV Policy

Federal regulations prescribe the calculation of a student's eligibility for federal financial aid funds when the student completely withdraws (officially or unofficially) from the University during the semester. This policy became effective beginning with the fall semester of 2000. For more information on Return to Title IV Policy, please download the appropriate file.

Download the Return to Title IV Policy

Quitting without going through the official withdrawal process:

Visit the Registrar site to to withdrawal from the University or use myUK to withdrawal from a course.

Recipients Receiving All E Grades:

Students who fail to officially withdraw often wind up with failing grades. Students with all E grades are also subject to Return to Title IV regulations. In addition to the implications all E grades have for satisfactory academic progress, federal financial aid recipients are also subject to Federal Return to Title IV regulations and are considered unofficially withdrawn at the midpoint of the semester. Without acceptable proof of       attendance or participation in a class related activity beyond the midpoint of the semester, the Federal Title IV financial aid credited for the term is refunded to the aid program(s) from which it came at the rate of 50 percent of university charges. Loans are refunded before grants. For example, a student with a $2,750 Subsidized Direct Loan and $1,500 Pell Grant fails all of his/her classes for a semester. His/her charges totaled $3,651. Federal regulations require that 50 percent ($3,651 x 50%) or $1,826 be refunded for the Subsidized Direct Loan. The student's loan debt decreases, but he/she owes the University $1,826 (assuming his/her account balance was $-0-).

What is acceptable proof of attendance or participation in a class related activity?

A letter on department letterhead from a professor, instructor or academic advisor noting the last date of a student's presence in class or involvement in a class related activity. Financial aid recipients receiving all E grades for a given semester are notified by mail of the deadline for submitting documentation of class attendance or participation for that particular term. Late certification is not accepted.

Why single out students with all E grades?
The Student Financial Aid Office is obligated by federal statute to handle aid for students with all E grades in this manner. Failure to do so would result in monetary fines to the University and jeopardize our continued participation in federally funded aid programs. The assumption behind this law is that a student receiving all E grades probably did not complete the semester, but rather walked-away from school without officially withdrawing.

University of Kentucky