MenuMenu

Campus News

Magic in the Math Department

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 14:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 25, 2016) — In organizing its spring 2016 information meeting for majors, the University of Kentucky Department of Mathematics solicited faculty to give the closing address. Professor Richard Ehrenborg volunteered, but suggested a less traditional approach.

 

“I said I wasn’t going to give a talk,” he recalled. “I was going to do a show.”

 

Instead of giving a lecture on new developments in the field or solving complex equations on the chalkboard, Ehrenborg led volunteers and spectators through tricks involving playing cards and simple geometric shapes. In short order, he was able to predict a single card’s location in a shuffled deck and prove that 168 and 169 are actually equal to each other.

 

But these were no mere sleight of hand illusions — as Ehrenborg points out, these intriguingly simple tricks all demonstrate valuable mathematical principles. These efforts are also part of his larger goal to rebrand perceptions about math and address something he finds missing.

 

His philosophy is simple: math is fun.

 

“In English, they might study Shakespeare’s comedies because they’re more fun. In math, people have suffered through learning to add and multiply, to do their taxes, and if you’re an engineer you had to learn calculus. What’s missing is the fun part,” he said.

 

Ehrenborg’s research and scholarship focuses on the area of combinatorics, which deals with analyzing the properties of discrete structures. But he has also engaged in research projects and educational demonstrations on the mathematics of juggling — he is always looking for ways to bring math to the people.

 

“I like working with structures and counting things, but there is also a problem in sharing mathematics — people don’t have the ability to visualize it,” he explained. “People don’t remember formulas, they remember pictures. Math is not memorization.”

 

To combat this — or, as he puts it, to “do some good propaganda for mathematics” — Ehrenborg emphasizes shapes while in the classroom and continues building his repertoire of “magic” outside of it. He also partnered with the College of Arts and Sciences to record and share videos of his enthusiastic demonstrations.

 

This is all part of his ongoing effort to bring math to a wider audience.

 

“Math has to be visual, and I love the idea of show and tell. Even when I teach differential equations there are shapes. It’s important to do these visual things because that’s what people can really understand and get excited about.”

 

And if you still aren’t convinced, maybe you should see for yourself…

 

You can watch videos of Ehrenborg’s “math magic” tricks here:

https://vimeo.com/162427159

https://vimeo.com/163002319

 

As well as video of Ehrenborg’s juggling lecture here:

www.ms.uky.edu/~jrge/Mathematics_of_Juggling_2009.html

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Marshall County Gets UK Dental Clinic

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 14:43

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 25, 2016) –  The new University of Kentucky Dentistry West Regional Clinic was celebrated Friday, May 20 with a ribbon cutting ceremony. The new general dentistry clinic, located in the Marshall County Health Department in Benton, Kentucky, will open in early June.

 

"The opening of the UK Dentistry West Regional Clinic marks the culmination of a lot of people working toward achieving a common goal," said Laura Hawes-Hammons, director of the Marshall County Health Department. "The clinic is going to be so wonderful for this county and the people in the surrounding area.”

 

The Marshall County Health Department dedicated the wing of the dental clinic to former Marshall County Judge-Executive Mike Miller to honor his memory for his dedication to improving the oral health of Marshall County residents.

 

The West Regional Clinic will offer comprehensive general dentistry, including: 

•      Preventive services (cleanings, sealants, x-rays, and diagnostic exams);

•      Restorative services (fillings and crowns);

•      Endodontic treatment (root canals);

•      Prosthodontic services (dentures, partials, and bridges); and

•      Sedation for certain procedures.

 

“UK Dentistry is focused on improving the oral health of Kentuckians. We are really looking forward to our partnership with the Marshall County Health Department and working toward making Marshall County a cavity-free county,” said Dr. Ted Raybould, chief of the UK Dentistry Division of Adult, Pediatric and Public Health.

 

The clinic will begin seeing patients in June, Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Medicaid and several other dental insurance plans will be accepted. More information is available online at ukdentistry.org/west.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, (859) 257-1076

 

UK Forensics Doubles Previous Best, Has First Competitor in Elimination Rounds at NFA Nationals

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 14:14

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 25, 2016)  The University of Kentucky Forensics team joined 85 other colleges and universities for the 2016 National Forensic Association (NFA) national tournament hosted by Ball State University.

 

UK placed 24th at the competition which is nearly double the team’s previous best performance of 42nd at the 2015 national tournament. Over 1,800 speeches and 100 debaters from across the nation took part in this five-day event. Each speech has to qualify to attend this tournament by placing in the final round at a regular season competition. This year, UK qualified 30 speeches which is another team best.

 

Senior Abel Rodriguez III advanced to the quarterfinal rounds in after dinner speaking and extemporaneous speaking. These two breaks to the elimination rounds at the National Forensic Association national tournament are the first since the team began competition in 2012.

 

“As one of the founding members of the team, Abel has been a part of UK Forensics from the very beginning,” said Director of Forensics Timothy Bill. “It is really fitting that he is also our first out-round participant at NFA. He has worked incredibly hard for this moment and has truly earned his place among the nation’s best.”

 

The University of Kentucky Forensic team also competed at the Interstate Oratorical Association national tournament held at University of Nebraska Omaha from April 28-29. Only two students are allowed to participate from each state and this is the first year that the University of Kentucky has ever qualified for this tournament.

 

Anyone with questions about the UK Forensics team are encouraged to contact Director of Forensics Timothy Bill at timothy.bill@uky.edu. UK Forensics is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the UK College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit www.ukforensics.com.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

JMLA Appoints UK School of Information Science Director to Senior Editors Team

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 13:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 25, 2016)  The Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA) has appointed Jeff Huber, director and professor of the University of Kentucky School of Information Science, to its senior editors team.

 

JMLA is a peer-reviewed quarterly journal authored by field professionals and published by the Medical Library Association (MLA) to advance the practice and research of health sciences librarianship and information specialists.

 

JMLA Editor-in-Chief Diane Cooper outlined the journal’s strategic goals for the 2016-2017 calendar year: 1) to strengthen editorial operations and organization, 2) to develop editorial content strategy, and 3) to update business and distribution models. The overarching goal, however, is much simpler to define — to produce a high quality research journal of even greater value to health sciences librarians.

 

"Jeff in his position will help with suggestions and advice to improve and strengthen JMLA’s evidence-based research structure and content through data sharing, more randomized library research studies, and encouraging multi-institute inter-library research,” Cooper said.

 

According to Cooper, the senior editors team is a recent addition to the JMLA editorial board that she finds will fulfill her initial goal, which is to establish a limited number of positions that call for experienced members who advise and spread awareness of the journal to readers and submitters. The JMLA editorial board team will also consist of JMLA features editors, assistant editors and JMLA reviewers.

 

“As the premiere venue for disseminating research findings related to health sciences librarianship, JMLA is uniquely positioned to advance evidence-based practice where health information professionals are concerned,” Huber said.

 

Huber has more than 24 years of health sciences communication and information experience in various positions from research information scientist to academia. He joined the UK School of Information Science in 2008 and by 2013, it held a "top 5" ranking in health librarianship according to U.S. News and World Report. Additionally, Huber has served on the JMLA editorial board for 15 years and was recently named the 2016 Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education recipient by MLA. All of which have prepared him to accept his new responsibilities as JMLA senior editor.  

 

Huber convened with colleagues of the new editorial board at the JMLA editorial board meeting on May 15 during the annual Medical Library Association meeting in Toronto.

 

About the UK School of Information Science

 

The School of Library and Information Science in the College of Communication and Information at the University of Kentucky became the School of Information Science on July 1, 2015. The name change follows the expansion of programs at the school (both at the graduate and undergraduate level) and the increasing diversity of professions in the information field. The Instructional Communication and Research program became a part of the school in 2013 and the Information Communication Technology program debuted in 2014. The school offers a M.S. in Library Science, School Media Certification, M.S. in Information Communication Technology, B.A./B.S. in Information Communication Technology and an undergraduate minor in information studies

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: May 25, 1912

Tue, 05/24/2016 - 12:29

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 25, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 231st entry from May 25, 1912, recalls the release of the yearbook, The Kentuckian, and an event held by the undergraduate women for the senior women.

 

May 25th. Annuals out! Go over to Main Building and bring back two. Annie Louise and I go to the Hop (after I come out of my retreat.) We stay awhile, drink some delicious punch, then go to town where we have a “banana sandwich.” Later we return to the Hop. It was lovely of the girls to give it to the Seniors.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Maxwell Place's White Oaks are Special in Many Ways

Mon, 05/23/2016 - 17:47

LEXINGTON, Ky., (May 25, 2016) — More than a mere spike of wood prodding the sky, a tree is a protector, a nurturer, a collector and a keeper of tales. Two white oaks in the yard at Maxwell Place on the University of Kentucky campus, trees that probably have witnessed much of UK’s history, embody all of that. And now they’ve been adopted, so others will know their story.

 

Rachel Landham, a graduate student in the Department of Forestry, and Anna Conrad, a postdoctoral scholar in Forest Health Research and Education Center, both in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, have spent time studying the oaks’ genetics — getting to know them, you might say — and decided it might be nice to adopt them through the Adopt-A-Tree program, part of the Urban Forest Initiative.

 

It is not unusual for people to form a personal connection with trees. "There is always something to make you wonder in the shape of a tree, the trembling of a leaf," Albert Schweitzer said. Henry David Thoreau wrote, “I frequently tramped eight or 10 miles through the deepest snow to keep an appointment with a beech tree, or a yellow birch, or an old acquaintance among the pines.”

 

Mary Arthur, UK forestry professor and co-leader of the initiative with Lynne Rieske-Kinney, UK forest entomology professor, said the idea behind the Adopt-a-Tree program was to promote the concept of noticing specific trees and thinking about what makes them special.

 

“We’re not the first people to ever adopt trees, but we wanted it to be about the relationship that people have with trees,” Arthur said. “When you ask people to think about trees, what you discover is people have these kinds of amazing personal stories and relationships with trees in general or a specific tree.”

 

Arthur said the idea was to link these personal connections to an understanding of all the ways trees give back, ways like sequestering carbon from the atmosphere, absorbing storm water runoff and providing protection from wind and heat.

 

Landham and Conrad are both interested in the genetic variability of white oaks. Landham’s research for her master’s degree focuses on white oak genetics and testing the DNA extraction protocol on white oak in the region — specifically in eight research plots near McKee, Kentucky, in the Daniel Boone National Forest and also on campus where possible.

 

“I remembered from my sophomore year when I took dendrology, which is learning how to identify trees, I learned specifically how to identify white oak from the two white oaks in the president’s yard,” Landham said.

 

She suggested to her advisers in the Forest Health Research and Education Center that she could take samples from the two iconic trees, thinking they could test the DNA extraction protocol, sequence the DNA and learn more about their ecological importance.

 

White oak is one of the dominant oaks found in Appalachia and throughout Kentucky. It provides a host of ecological services, including food for wildlife and habitat for birds and bats. On a human scale, they are an important component of the whiskey barrel industry.

 

“White oak is also commonly under the influence of forest management practices,” Landham said. “It’s been shown that forest thinnings increase the growth rate of these trees. My research is specifically looking at the impacts forest thinning has on genetic variability of that species within and among populations.”

 

Conrad said the Forest Health Research and Education Center recognizes the importance of white oak, both ecologically and economically. She is taking some of the DNA information Landham gathered from the Maxwell Place oaks to use in her study of white oak genetics.

 

“Ultimately, we hope that information obtained from these oaks can be used to support other efforts we have focused on white oak genetic improvement, so white oak will continue to be an important component of Kentucky forests,” Conrad said. “Our research could potentially help reforestation efforts and also assist in the wood-based products industry in the state.”

 

That is the big picture, but don’t discount the importance of the two oaks at Maxwell Place. To adopt the trees, the women submitted the measurement of their diameters at breast height or DBH. In the case of one tree, the DBH was 79.5 centimeters or 31.3 inches. The other was 96 centimeters or 37.8 inches. Once they had those measurements, they used the National Tree Benefits Calculator, a tool provided on the Adopt-a-Tree website, to calculate what the trees give back. In the case of the smaller tree, Conrad determined that the tree intercepts more than 9,000 gallons of storm water runoff each year, conserves 173 kilowatt hours annually and reduces atmospheric carbon by about 1,500 pounds, all of which results in a value of $135 annually.

 

The Adopt-A-Tree program is administered by Nic Williamson. For more information about adopting a tree, visit the Urban Forest Initiative website, http://UKnTrees.ca.uky.edu/adopt-a-tree. More information about the Forest Health Research and Education Center can be found at www.foresthealthcenter.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324

UK's Adedeji Selected as a Fellow of Carnegie African Diaspora Program

Mon, 05/23/2016 - 17:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 25, 2016) — A University of Kentucky faculty member will be one of 59 African-born scholars based in the United States and Canada who will travel to Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda to conduct academic projects at 41 host universities through the Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program. The fellows will work on a range of projects across disciplines, from agroforestry to e-learning modules for nursing, and from ethnomusicology to military mental health.

 

Akinbode Adedeji, an assistant professor in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is currently visiting his alma mater, the Department of Food Technology at University of Ibadan in Nigeria, until June 2. He is working in three core areas of the fellowship: research collaboration, graduate mentoring and curriculum co-development.

 

Adedeji earned a bachelor’s degree in food engineering from Ladoke Akintola University of Technology in Ogbomoso, Nigeria, and a master’s degree in food technology from the University of Ibadan. In 2010, Adedeji earned a doctorate in food process engineering from the Bioresource Engineering Department at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. Following his graduation, he worked as a faculty lecturer and post-doctoral fellow in four different countries — Nigeria, France, Canada and the United States, teaching and conducting research. He came to UK in 2014.

 

Leading research efforts in value-added agricultural products in the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Adedeji’s research focuses on applying engineering principles to develop processes and systems that will add value to agricultural products and ensure their safety. His specific interests include value addition to underutilized grains, specifically millet, through extrusion processing, which is the biochemical conversion of food processing waste into valuable products and heat and mass transfer applications such as frying, drying and freezing. He’s also interested in the application of non-thermal techniques in ensuring safety and quality of foods and using non-destructive methods to determine the safety and quality of food materials by gathering information from the entire electromagnetic spectrum, rather than just the limited visible spectrum.

 

Other research Adedeji is actively pursuing includes bioactive compounds and efficient oil extraction and developing appropriate technologies for curbing post-harvest losses in developing countries.

 

The Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program, now in its third year, is designed to avert Africa’s brain drain, build capacity at the host institutions, and develop long-term, mutually beneficial collaborations between universities in Africa, the United States and Canada. It is funded by Carnegie Corporation of New York and managed by the Institute of International Education in collaboration with U.S. International University-Africa in Nairobi, Kenya, which houses the advisory council.

 

This new round of fellowships will support several projects that involve more than one host institution to encourage cooperation among African universities. Several program alumni will also receive support to enable them to build on previous successful collaborations to advance the projects and deepen the ties among the faculty members and their home and host institutions.

 

Fellowships match host universities with African-born scholars and cover the expenses for the visiting scholars including transportation, a daily stipend and the cost of obtaining visas and health insurance. A total of 169 fellows have been selected since the program’s inception in 2013.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Aimee Nielson, 859-257-7707.

UK Announces Camps for Military Teens

Mon, 05/23/2016 - 17:04

LEXINGTON, Ky., (May 24, 2016)  The University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service will host five camps for teens from military families during 2016 and 2017.

 

A new offering in 2016 is the Teens of Fallen Warriors Resiliency Excursion. This camp is for teenagers between 14 and 18 years old who have lost a service member parent. During the camp, teen participants will work on the healing process and form relationships with peers who share similar experiences. In addition, they will learn about teamwork and leadership skills as they go on several outdoor adventures that include canoeing, horseback riding and ropes challenges. The camp is scheduled for June 24-29, at the Life Adventure Center in Versailles, Kentucky.

 

The four military adventure camps immerse teens and a parent in nature in a way that is challenging, fun and strengthens bonds between families. These camps are open to teens between 14 and 18 who have a parent or a guardian who is active duty, Reserve, National Guard or is a veteran or Department of Defense civilian or contractor.

 

Offerings this year include:

· Whitewater Rafting and Outdoor Quest, July 8-13, in Oakhill, West Virginia;

· Red River Gorge Rock Climbing, Rappelling and Canopy Excursion, July 22-25, in Campton, Kentucky;

· Extreme Wilderness Survival Outdoor Expedition, Oct. 21-23, at Land Between the Lakes in Golden Pond, Kentucky; and

· Mammoth Cave Ultimate Adventure, March 3-6 in Mammoth Cave, Kentucky.

      

While the camps’ locations are mostly in Kentucky, families from any state are welcome to attend.

 

Spaces are filling quickly on and are filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Register at www.lifeadventurecenter.org/military.html. For more information on the Kentucky camps or about volunteer opportunities, contact Tyrone Atkinson, coordinator for UK Family and Consumer Sciences Extension military programs, at 859-218-1546 or tcatki2@uky.edu or Kelly Ulm with the Life Adventure Center at 859-873-3271 or kelly@lifeadventurecenter.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katie Pratt, 859-257-8774.

 

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: May 24, 1912

Mon, 05/23/2016 - 16:10

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 24, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 230th diary entry from May 24, 1912, recalls a meeting regarding a lead on employment.

 

May 24th. See Prof. Gillis who puts me on a new trail.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Ridolfo Wins Computers and Composition Distinguished Book Award

Mon, 05/23/2016 - 15:17

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 25, 2016) — Jim Ridolfo of the University of Kentucky and co-editor William Hart-Davidson of Michigan State University (MSU) were recently awarded the Computers and Composition Distinguished Book Award for their book “Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities.”

 

The distinguished book award is given once a year at the Computers and Writing Conference by the Conference on College Composition and Communication for book-length works that contribute in substantial and innovative ways to the field of computers and composition.

 

Ridolfo is an associate professor and director of composition at the UK College of Arts and Sciences Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies. His second book, "Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities," was published by University of Chicago Press in January 2015.

 

Hart-Davidson is associate dean of graduate studies in the College of Arts and Letters at Michigan State and senior researcher at Matrix, a digital humanities and social sciences research center at MSU. Ridolfo is an associate researcher at Matrix.

 

Computers and Composition is an international journal devoted to exploring the use of computers in writing classes, writing programs and writing research. It provides a forum for discussing issues connected with writing and computer use. It also offers information about integrating computers into writing programs on the basis of sound theoretical and pedagogical decisions and empirical evidence.

 

The digital humanities is a rapidly growing field that is transforming humanities research through digital tools and resources. Researchers, for example, can now quickly trace every one of Issac Newton’s annotations, use social media to engage academic and public audiences in the interpretation of cultural texts, and visualize travel via ox cart in third-century Rome or camel caravan in ancient Egypt. Rhetorical scholars are leading the revolution by fully utilizing the digital toolbox, finding themselves at the nexus of digital innovation.

 

“Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities” is a timely, multidisciplinary collection bridging scholarship in rhetorical studies and the digital humanities. It offers guidance on how the theories and methodologies of rhetorical studies can enhance all work in digital humanities, and vice versa. Ridolfo and Hart-Davidson assembled a broad group of more than 30 accomplished scholars representing the cutting edge of research, offering guidance that will energize and inspire future collaborations.

 

Ridolfo is a recipient of the 2012 Middle East and North Africa Regional Research Fulbright for the West Bank and Israel and the 2014 Richard Ohmann Award for Outstanding Article, which recognizes excellent scholarship in the field of rhetoric, published by the professional journal College English. His work has also appeared in the journals JAC; Enculturation; Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology and Pedagogy; Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition and Culture; and Rhetoric Review. For more information about Ridolfo, visit https://pa.as.uky.edu/fruitful-divergence-jim-ridolfo. His full curricula vitae is available at http://rid.olfo.org/doc/ridolfocv.pdf.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

Five UK Faculty Complete 2016 Bluegrass Higher Education Consortium Academic Leadership Academy

Mon, 05/23/2016 - 14:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 24, 2016) — Chana Akins, DeShana Collett, Melinda Ickes, Huajing Maske and Seungahn Nah of the University of Kentucky were among 41 fellows who recently completed the third Bluegrass Academic Leadership Academy, an initiative of the Bluegrass Higher Education Consortium.

 

The Academic Leadership Academy is a presidential initiative, led by the 12 presidents represented in the consortium, to build future academic leaders in the Bluegrass Region. One hundred thirty-four fellows have now completed the program in three years. The purpose of the academy is to encourage faculty and staff to consider leadership career paths and to provide guidance in developing the skills that are requisites for effective institutional leadership to ensure a sound and successful future for their institution and the Bluegrass region.

 

The Bluegrass Higher Education Consortium and the Academic Leadership Academy is managed by Bluegrass Tomorrow.

 

“The desired outcome,” said Bluegrass Higher Education Consortium Co-Chair John Roush of Centre College, “is to create a cohort of leaders for Central Kentucky’s 12 institutions of higher education that have the proficiencies to work with their colleagues by effectively employing quality leadership skills and being able to have insight into the overall role of the university so as to strategically lead the next generation of learners in the Bluegrass region.”

 

The Academic Leadership Academy also addresses one of the goals the presidents set in the signing of the charter agreement for the consortium in 2012:  “To design professional development/leadership development opportunities for administration, faculty and staff.”

 

The fellows experienced two full-day sessions on Feb. 18 at Berea College and April 29 at Spindletop. Keynote presentations by presidents for the two sessions included:  President Lyle Roelofs of Berea College, President Seamus Carey of Transylvania University and President Eli Capilouto of the University of Kentucky.  

 

On campus interim projects were also completed with faculty working together in teams to work on a project which benefits each participating educational institution. The University of Kentucky’s project was titled, “Perspectives on Recruitment, Promotion and Retention of Women Faculty.” Others included: Asbury University - Cross Cultural Engagement Requirements; Berea College - "Invent Your Life” student model; BCTC - challenges of first year faculty members; Centre College - improving faculty recognition programs; EKU -  “Metacognition” student’s awareness of their own learning styles and study habits; Georgetown College - promoting its strong, traditional liberal arts curriculum as effective career preparation in response to recent attacks on the liberal arts; Kentucky State University - “Transformation 2.0 Accountability, Commitment and Urgency;” Midway University - a campus-wide teaching and learning program for faculty development; Morehead State University - “MCOMPASS: Mobile App to Aid Student Success and Retention;” Sullivan University - soft-skill, toastmaster training for advisory boards; Transylvania University - comparison of core general education goals with Berea, Centre and Sewanee.

 

The Bluegrass Higher Education Consortium was chartered in 2012, under the Bluegrass Tomorrow 501c3 umbrella, with the mission of advancing the region both economically and educationally.  The 12 participating regionally accredited four-year institutions are: Asbury University, Berea College, Bluegrass Community and Technical College, Centre College, Eastern Kentucky University, Georgetown College, Midway College, Morehead State University, Kentucky State University, Sullivan University, Transylvania University and the University of Kentucky. The presidents of each institution constitute the executive committee of the board of directors.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Sarah Geegan, 859-257-5365; sarah.geegan@uky.edu

"see blue." #selfie: Adnan Toric

Mon, 05/23/2016 - 10:01

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 24, 2016)  Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! That's why we've introduced "see blue." #selfie  a series on UKNow that lets student leaders from across campus tell us a little bit more about themselves and their organizations. Up this week, the 2016 vice president of community outreach for the University of Kentucky Interfraternity Council.

 

Adnan Toric is a rising senior history and English double major from Louisville, Kentucky. Though he claims Louisville as his hometown, Toric was born in Bosnia and moved to the United States when he was two years old. Toric was impacted by that move and now uses the experience to serve others, demonstrating how one can make a difference in other people's lives by contributing even just a little bit. Toric is a brother of Delta Sigma Phi, where he serves as the newly initiated brother educator, and is also involved in Student Government and the UK Service Council. Get to know Toric in his "see blue." #selfie!  

 

UKNow: What is your major and what year are you?

Adnan Toric: I am going to be a senior. I'm a double major in history and English.

 

UK: Where are you from?

AT: I was born in Bosnia. My family moved here in '97; so I was about two years old. We have been here ever since. Well, in Louisville.

 

UK: Tell me about your position on the Interfraternity Council (IFC).

AT: So I'm the vp of community outreach. My duties, as outlined, are to meet with the philanthropy and community chairs of each fraternity each semester, conduct round tables where we discuss ideas and conduct interaction between them throughout the year. Younger chapters said they have benefitted from connecting with other fraternity chairs, especially ones trying to start philanthropies now.

 

UK: What do you like most about being vp of community outreach?

AT: It's good for me because when we moved to the U.S. we got a bunch of help. People gave us housing and awesome stuff, so it's stuck with me. You can make a difference in people's lives if you contribute a little bit.

 

UK: When did you become involved in IFC?

AT: This is my second year doing it. I came in last spring and it was because the old vp of community outreach was going to study abroad and they needed a replacement. I was re-elected and this semester I have been focusing on facilitating better philanthropy in chapters. I would rather see chapters succeed. A few chapters have started new philanthropies.

 

UK: What impact do you want to leave on IFC for the future? 

AT: I will be in this position until the end of next fall. I would like for people to understand that IFC is a resource for chapters instead of a governing body. People can use it for help for philanthropies, community service and networking with other chapters.

 

UK: What has been an initiative that you've enjoyed so far being involved in IFC?

AT: Something Weston Loyd started. He started the IFC DanceBlue gala and I minimally helped him but I really want to keep that going. I'd like for that to be a tradition. I would like for round tables going on between philanthropy and community chairs to keep going so they can begin doing joint events.

 

UK: What else are you involved in? 

AT: SGA, IFC, UK Service Council, Delta Sigma Phi — I'm newly initiated brother educator for D Sig. It's a position to help newly initiated brothers acclimate to what we do and what they can get involved in. For SGA, I'm the student disability resource coordinator. The bulk of what I'm involved in is service-based.

 

UK: Did you want to join a fraternity coming into college or did you decide to join after you had been at UK a semester or two?

AT: I joined Delta Sig as a sophomore. I was first in my family to go to college and I didn't understand what Greek life was. All I knew about it was negative media based on perceptions. My friends kind of influenced me to join sophomore year and I saw it was more a tool to be more involved on campus. The brotherhood and friendships you make are so valuable.

 

UK: Has there been a teacher or staff member that has made a positive impact on your time here at UK?

AT: Dr. Philip Harling — he’s the director for the Gaines Center. I took "History 121" as a freshman. He loved teaching and didn’t care about how much students worked, more so the process of them learning and engaging with the material. In class I would always speak to him and now I stay in contact with him every semester about classes and how we are doing. He’s really like a step-in father. He’s been there for me whenever I need it — when I'm stressed — I’ve really appreciated it. 

 

UK: Who is your favorite music artist right now?

AT:  "VIEWS" just dropped so I'd say Drake. He can do a lot with his music. He can sing and rap and drop in Jamaican beats. Definitely Drake.

 

UK: Who is your biggest role model?

AT: I would say my brother-in-law, Danny. He has been married to my sister for four or five years now. The way he interacts with everyone is really positive and he genuinely cares about people. Everyone has things they are dealing with or going through. It’s important for people to realize that and most don’t take the time to care for others like he does. He’s very motivated. He and my sister have worked hard and they are moving to California, where they’ve always wanted to live.

 

UK: If you could have a super power, what would it be?

AT: Oh for sure to live forever. I feel like it would be so interesting to see what happens. Even in the last 100 years think of how different the world has become, the way we cook, travel … I think it's interesting to see how people innovate.

 

UK: Growing up, what did you want to be?

AT: I wanted to be an attorney. Just watching TV, I thought how it was interesting how they stood up for people in instances where those people didn't understand how the legal process worked.

 

UK: What's the best gift you've ever received?

AT: So, when I was seven or eight we went to visit our family sponsor — a very nice lady. She paid for a lot when we came to the U.S. She invited us over to Christmas and my older brother and sister got clothes and she got me a Buzz Lightyear space ship and doll and I thought it was the coolest thing. That was the best because it always stuck with me.

 

UK: Who would you want to play you in a movie about your life?

AT: Bradley Cooper. He's the dude. From limitless and the stuff he does … he knows what he's doing and he's doing him.

 

UK: What is your favorite city ever?

AT: Quebec City is awesome. That made me feel more like home there in the summer. Everyone was really nice and very inviting and welcoming. And it was so clean. You could tell everyone was happy that lived there.

 

UK: What would you tell an incoming freshman? 

AT: Get involved. It's beneficial to your future and you meet a lot of great people no matter your affiliantion you can become good friends and meet great mentors from teachers and administration that are really there to help you. Freshman see it like a high school environment but in reality people are at the university because they care and they are there to help. It would make everyone's day better.

 

"see blue." #selfies will appear every other Tuesday on UKNow. Know a student leader we should feature? Contact Rebecca Stratton at rebecca.stratton@uky.edu to nominate someone.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Rebecca Stratton, rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-323-2395

 

UK Crime Bulletin Issued in Arson of Reynolds Warehouse #1

Sun, 05/22/2016 - 17:35

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 22, 2016) — In the interest of safety, the University of Kentucky Police Department has issued the following UK Crime Bulletin for the University of Kentucky campus.

 

It was reported to UK Police that a fire had occurred on Saturday, May 21, 2016 at approximately 11:48 p.m. on the 2nd floor of Reynolds Building (Warehouse) #1.  Unknown person(s) gained entry to the building and set fire to furniture.  No other damage to the building occurred.  No injuries have been reported because of this occurrence. 

 

University of Kentucky Police Department has issued this Crime Bulletin for the UK community in compliance with the “Timely Notice” provision of the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998.

 

If anyone has any information regarding these incidents, please contact UK Police at 859-257-8573.

 

The University of Kentucky values a safe community for all students, staff, faculty, and visitors. In the interest of promoting a safe and secure campus environment, UK Police offer the following safety precautions:

· If you see something, say something. For emergencies, call 911.

· Carry a cell phone to be able to call for help in emergencies.

· In the event that you smell smoke, dial 911 immediately.

· If you locate a fire, pull a fire alarm and then dial 911. Do NOT attempt to extinguish a fire unless you are properly trained to do so.

· Anytime a fire alarm is activated, EVACUATE the building immediately.

·Know the primary and secondary escape routes for each of your locations, should an actual fire occur.

 

 

UK Juniors Win Boren Scholarships to Study Chinese, Russian Abroad

Fri, 05/20/2016 - 15:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 24, 2016) The University of Kentucky Office of Nationally Competitive Awards has announced that international studies junior Shauna Rust and foreign language and international economics junior Amaris Wade have been awarded the National Security Education Program (NSEP) David L. Boren Scholarship for up to $20,000 toward the study of Russian and Chinese languages abroad. Rust and Wade are two of 165 undergraduate student award winners selected nationally from a pool of 820 applicants.

 

Boren Scholarships, an initiative of the National Security Education Program, provide funding opportunities for U.S. undergraduate students to study less commonly taught languages in world regions critical to U.S. interests, and underrepresented in study abroad, including Africa, Asia, Central and Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America and the Middle East.

 

Boren Scholars represent a vital pool of highly motivated individuals who wish to work in the federal national security arena. In exchange for funding, Boren Scholars commit to working in the federal government for at least one year after graduation.

 

Rust, the daughter of Kelley and Michael Rust of Georgetown, Kentucky, was drawn to Russian studies because of her parents' service in the military and her brother, who is currently deployed with the U.S. Navy in Eastern Europe. The Chellgren Fellow is also pursuing a minor in political science.

 

The Boren Scholar credits several faculty for helping her get selected for the scholarship. "Professor Cynthia Ruder has supported me throughout my language learning and throughout the Boren process. In addition, Professor Erin Koch and Dr. Patricia Whitlow helped me immensely with my application."

 

Upon completion of her undergraduate degree at UK, Rust plans to pursue graduate studies in an area related to foreign affairs.

 

Wade, the daughter of Dewayne and Kathryn Wade of Lexington, has focused her studies on Chinese as part of her foreign language and international economics major at UK. The Boren Scholarship will provide her with her first opportunity to travel abroad in an area of great interest to her since age 10.

 

"Thanks to Boren, I will have my very first going abroad experience at the International Chinese Language Program at National Taiwan University this coming fall. My Boren-funded study will enable me to push my Chinese level from advanced to fluent or near-fluent. Since the program is specially designed for professionals and academics whose careers necessitate the use of Mandarin, my study at the program will serve me well when seeking jobs in my field in the future," Wade said.

 

Outside of the classroom, the Honors Program member has participated in undergraduate research on the valuation of women's labor in China with Liang Luo, associate professor of Chinese studies, and interned with the World Trade Center Kentucky. Before leaving for Taiwan, Wade will intern with the U.S. Commercial Service and take part in economics research with doctoral candidate Daniel Duncan and Robert Gillette, associate professor of economics. Wade credits Luo, Duncan, as well as Matthew Wells, Masamichi Inoue and Jianjun He of the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures for helping her achieve success in her fields of interest.

 

Upon completion of her bachelor's degree, Wade plans to attend graduate school in international commerce or diplomacy in order to pursue a job in the U.S. Department of State.

 

UK students interested in Boren Scholarships may apply through the university’s Office of Nationally Competitive Awards. Part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education, the office assists current UK undergraduate and graduate students and recent alumni in applying for external scholarships and fellowships funded by sources (such as a nongovernment foundation or government agency) outside the university. These major awards honor exceptional students across the nation. Students who are interested in these opportunities are encouraged to begin work with Pat Whitlow at the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards well in advance of the scholarship deadline.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

VIDEO: Families Make Up Important Part of UK Campus Community

Fri, 05/20/2016 - 15:16

 

Videos produced by UK Public Relations & Marketing. To view captions for the videos, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 23, 2016) — There are so many families who make the University of Kentucky a special place to live, work, learn, discover, heal and serve together.  

 

For more than two years, UKNow has tried to showcase the community atmosphere that is part of the UK campus through the Big Blue Family series. 

 

The series has showcased twins who succeed on the field, court and in the classroom, large families full of UK alumni, siblings who practice medicine, couples who research together, deans married to each other and even tumbling brothers.

 

This series will retire as UKNow gears up for another academic year with more opportunities to tell new and different stories about the university and its community. 

 

Watch the playlist above for a look back at all of the Big Blue Family videos produced over the past two years. 

 

UKNow will continue to strive to tell compelling stories about the members of our campus community. If you know of someone who you think should be featured or have an idea for new stories or even a new series about the University of Kentucky, please email us.  Who knows? We might just choose your suggestion for our next feature or series on UKNow!

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

VIDEO CONTACTS:  Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu; or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu

UK Virology Trainees Featured on LabTV

Fri, 05/20/2016 - 14:46

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 23, 2016) — In the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, a lab team led by Becky Dutch is studying a virus 99 percent of us get by age five, but most of us have never heard of called human metapneumovirus (HMPV).

 

HMPV is a respiratory virus that wasn’t identified until 15 years ago, but it’s "probably the second or third cause of viral pneumonia in children and in the elderly," Dutch said. Her lab trainees — Edita Klimyte, Nicolas Cifuentes and Stacy Webb — are conducting NIH-funded research on HMPV and other respiratory viruses, and they recently shared their stories with LabTV.

 

Edita Klimyte, an MD-Ph.D student in Dutch’s lab, was born in Lithuania and moved to the Chicago-land area when she was eight. Her mother, who went back to school to become a pharmacist while working full-time, inspired Klimyte to focus on academics.

 

Video by UK REVEAL Research Media

 

Her dissertation project focuses on exploiting the fact that HMPV needs a specific type of sugar in order to bind to and enter cells: "The virus needs the sugar, so how can we disrupt that interaction between the viral particle and the target cell?" Klimyte uses 3D models that resemble human lung tissue to test the interaction between the virus and target cells.

 

Six years ago she was recruited to UK, and although she had never been to Kentucky before, it only took one day to convince Klimyte that UK was where she wanted to be. "When I left my interview, I decided if I got in here this was going to be the place for me. I felt like everyone here was accomplished and smart and making great strides in science, but the main thing that got to me, that set it apart, is everyone is extremely down to earth and very oriented towards teamwork and collaboration," Klimyte said.

 

Stacy Webb, who grew up in Dayton, Ohio, is a graduate research assistant in Dutch’s lab. She is the first person in her family to graduate from college, and she credits her high school physics teacher as fostering her interest in science.

 

Video by UK REVEAL Research Media

 

"At Kentucky Wesleyan College I got my degree in chemistry and now I’m studying biochemistry to get my Ph.D. at UK," Webb said. During her first undergraduate research project, she said, "There was a moment where I realized I was the first person to see something and that was really exciting, and I loved that feeling."

 

Webb said, "UK is an amazing place to do science. There’s a great environment here. It’s been a very nurturing environment."

 

She studies the entry mechanisms of Hendra virus, a dangerous virus that can move from animals into humans. "There are these proteins that cover the surface of the virus and we want to see how those contribute to viral entry, and potentially how those can be targeted for viral therapeutic purposes."

 

Nicolas Cifuentes, a postdoc in Dutch’s lab, grew up in Chile, where he did undergrad and graduate work in biology. He credits his mom as the one who pushed him into science. "She gave me a microscope when I was 14 years old and I really was trying to see anything that I could like ants, hair, whatever. I was really curious about things. As most scientists, what drives you is curiosity to know things, to understand things," Cifuentes said.

 

Video by UK REVEAL Research Media

 

He studies Hendra virus and HMPV. "Basically, we’re trying to understand how these viruses assemble inside the cell and build a new viral particle that is going to be spread from one person to the other," said Cifuentes.

 

"I’m very happy with being in Becky’s lab," he said. "She’s a very well-connected person. She’s very smart and she teaches you a lot , not only about science, but also about how to be involved with other scientists. We’re doing great science, we’re publishing in the best journals, so it’s a great place to be."             

 

Dutch, who will become president of the American Society of Virology in June, is training her 17th Ph.D. student. "My trainees are the future of science. As much as I love it, there will be a point which I’m not doing science anymore. And so, me training them means science keeps going," Dutch said. "I think we live in a society that is not as scientifically trained as it should be. So the more scientifically literate people we have, the better. They are the voices for science in the future."

 

LabTV.com features videos with medical researchers, including 32 from UK, who tell where they came from, how they chose their career, what they do each day in the lab, and why they love it. LabTV’s founder, Jay Walker of TEDMED, said he started the site because if high school students can personally identify with a young medical researcher, they are far more likely to consider becoming one. LabTV’s network features researchers working at leading universities, corporations and the National Institutes of Health.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu 

First-Year Honors Students Receive 2016-17 Lewis Scholarships

Fri, 05/20/2016 - 12:57

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 24, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Honors Program has selected 10 first-year students as recipients of the T.W. Lewis Scholarship beginning fall 2016. This third cohort of scholars represent Fayette County and a select number of Appalachian counties in Kentucky.

 

The 2016-17 Lewis Scholars are:

  • Caroline Ackerman, a graduate of Lafayette Senior High School in Fayette County, majoring in human health sciences.
  • Peter Briggs, a graduate of Trinity Christian Academy in Fayette County, majoring in mechanical engineering.
  • Halley Burge, a graduate of West Carter High School in Carter County, majoring in architecture.
  • Andrew Calvert, a graduate of Lexington Christian Academy in Fayette County, majoring in English.
  • Kelsey Cole, a graduate of Magoffin County High School in Magoffin County, major currently undeclared.
  • Alyssa Dyer, a graduate of Sheldon Clark High School in Martin County, majoring in art studio.
  • Elyssa Slusher, a graduate of Harlan High School in Harlan County, majoring in political science.
  • Mahala Walker, a graduate of Perry County Central High School in Perry County, majoring in biology.
  • Noah Welch, a graduate of Henry Clay High School in Fayette County, majoring in history.
  • Megan Yorkey, a graduate of Lexington Catholic High School in Fayette County, majoring in animal sciences.

Recipients are selected on the basis of their academic achievement, demonstrated leadership potential, entrepreneurial potential, strong personal character, intellectual ability and financial need. They each receive $5,000 toward the cost of tuition, room and board, with a maximum of $20,000 awardable per student.

 

T.W. Lewis is a former member of the UK Capital Campaign Steering Committee, serving during the "Dream, Challenge, Succeed" campaign. He received a degree in mechanical engineering from the university in 1971. Last fall, Lewis and his wife Jan gave the single largest gift in UK’s history: $23 million to establish the Lewis Honors College which was approved by the UK Board of Trustees this month.

 

For more information on the T. W. Lewis Scholarship Fund, visit www.uky.edu/academy/honors-incoming-scholarships or contact the Honors Program at 859-257-3111 or honprog@uky.edu

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

UK Alumna's First Novel Honored as Pulitzer Prize Finalist

Fri, 05/20/2016 - 11:58

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 23, 2016)  Relying on her Native American roots for her first novel, “Maud’s Line,” University of Kentucky alumna and Lexington businesswoman Margaret Verble has been named a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction.

 

The Pulitzer Committee described “Maud’s Line” as “A novel whose humble prose seems well-suited to the remote American milieu it so engagingly evokes: the Indian allotments of 1920s Oklahoma.” 

 

“Maud’s Line” is set in 1928, a year after the worst Mississippi River flood in history, a year before the Great Depression, and only a handful of years before the devastating droughts that eventually led to America’s Great Dust Bowl — difficult years for the Cherokee Nation. The story focuses on Maud Nail, a young Cherokee woman yearning for a better life on her ancestral allotment land in Eastern Oklahoma.

 

Although raised in Nashville, Tennessee, as a child Verble often visited extended family members still living on their ancestral lands. She proudly remains an enrolled and voting citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, and many of “Maud’s Line” characters and the setting are based on her childhood memories.

 

“Verble … tells a compelling story peopled with flawed yet sympathetic characters, sharing insights into Cherokee society on the parcels of land allotted to them after the Trail of Tears," reads a Kirkus review.

 

"Maud's Line" was pubished by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, and the paperback edition is planned for release in June. Verble has also authored academic publications and television scripts. Her short stories have appeared in various publications, including The Saturday Evening Post and the Arkansas Review.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: May 23, 1912

Fri, 05/20/2016 - 11:15

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 23, 2016) In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 229th diary entry from May 23, 1912, recalls ­­a lively event with friends and faculty, including the dean of women, where the students did their impressions of faculty members.

 

May 23rd. Kinky, Sister Nellie, Miss McCann and Dean Hamilton dress at the Hall for chapel exercises! Dean Hamilton carries numerous hand bags, and Jessie Mit’s coat and wears Miss King’s hat (unknown to Miss King.) Well, I took off the Dean, and I got more applause than I ever did before or after. Everybody has been calling me “Dean” ever since. Prof. Melcher said he didn’t know I had mimicking talents! Addie did Kinky up just too cute for anything, and Annie Louise as Sister Nellie, with Kathleen’s suit and Genevieve Johnson’s hat was fine. Miss McCann carried a butterfly net, but it was entirely superfluous. We had our pictures “took” after it was over. Wasn’t it too bad that Prof. Finley had to speak and spoil our program?

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UPK Book Makes Air Force Reading List

Fri, 05/20/2016 - 10:59

LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 23, 2016) Brian D. Laslie’s book, "The Air Force Way of War: Training and Tactics after Vietnam" published by University Press of Kentucky (UPK), has been selected to the Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force (CSAF) 2016 Professional Reading List. "The Air Force Way of War" was selected by Gen. Mark Welsh III, along with eight other books, several TED Talks, web publications, photographers, videos and journals.

 

The CSAF Professional Reading Program was started in 1996 to encourage a shared knowledge and reference base amongst members of the U.S. Air Force — including officers, enlisted members and civilians — that also advocates for air and space power. The reading lists are built around a common theme, and include inspiring material that motivates and offers perspective to Air Force members in all stages of their careers.

 

"This year’s reading list addresses every Airman on our total force team," Gen. Welsh said. "The profession of arms, Air Force heritage, and developing Airmen are topics that apply to all of us."

 

"The Air Force Way of War" is an unprecedented study of Red Flag, the groundbreaking training program introduced by the Air Force in the wake of heavy damage and casualties in Vietnam. The new program’s instruction methods were dubbed “realistic” because they prepared pilots for real-life situations better than the simple cockpit simulations of the past, and students gained proficiency on primary and secondary missions instead of superficially training for numerous possible scenarios.

 

In addition to discussing the program’s history and methods, Laslie analyzes the way its graduates actually functioned in combat during the 1980s and '90s in places such as Grenada, Panama, Libya and Iraq. Military historians have traditionally emphasized technological developments during this period and have overlooked the vital importance of advances in training, but Laslie’s exceptional study examines the seminal Red Flag program to illuminate the revolution in pilot instruction.

 

The Strategy Bridge, an online national security blog that is also featured on this year’s CSAF Reading List, called "The Air Force Way of War," "[A]n essential read for anyone who has ever experienced (or wanted to experience) the thrill of being a part of the world’s largest aerial exercise of 100+ aircraft battling over the Nevada desert, known as Red Flag." Their review also praised Laslie, who "skillfully illuminates the human depth and endeavors of a service that [...] works diligently and intelligently to integrate new technology with the humans who operate it."

 

"With thoughtful leadership, Gen. Welsh has put together a powerful list of diverse content that will challenge each airman to expand her or his worldview," said Vernā Myers, whose TED Talk on unconscious bias was also included on the list. "With this valuable information, airmen will be equipped to break down stereotypes, to understand the life experience of people different from themselves, and to foster a more inclusive, fair and high-performing Air Force."

 

"The Air Force Way of War" along with the other books on the reading list will be added to Air Force base libraries in the coming weeks. It is currently available wherever fine books are sold.

 

Brian D. Laslie is deputy command historian at the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM).

 

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that includes all of the state universities, five private colleges, and two historical societies. The press’ editorial program focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production and marketing departments of the press are found at the University of Kentucky, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation through the UK Libraries.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Pages