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UKPD Part of Central Kentucky Law Enforcement Partnership

Thu, 01/15/2015 - 08:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2014) — The University of Kentucky Police Department has joined 25 other law enforcement agencies in Central Kentucky in an inter-jurisdictional agreement that allows these agencies to cross jurisdictional boundaries in the course of criminal investigations.  The Bluegrass and Central Kentucky Unified Police Protection System, or BACKUPPS, was announced in a news conference in Frankfort Wednesday, Jan. 14.

 

BACKUPPS includes police departments and sheriff's offices in 15 counties.  The agreement took nearly five months to establish and includes standard operating procedures allowing all agencies' officers and detectives to work together on criminal investigations without jurisdictional restrictions.

 

State law allows these agreements, and while a few law enforcement agencies have entered into inter-jurisdictional agreements, BACKUPPS is by far the largest initiative of its kind in Kentucky.

 

UK Police Chief Joe Monroe says it reflects the collaborative nature of law enforcement today. "Never before have this many law enforcement agencies been able to come together for the common goal of protecting our community; this is definitely a historic initiative."

 

Monroe says the agreement with the other agencies will allow for a more efficient process.

 

"With the University of Kentucky Police Department being a part of the Bluegrass Area Central Kentucky Unified Police System, it will permit us to have additional resources should an event occur that would exceed the capacity of our police department and the surrounding jurisdiction," Monroe said. "This will also benefit UKPD in responding to assist our law enforcement partners in the event of a disaster or a large scale incident as well as in investigating criminals who flee our normal jurisdiction." 

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155

UK Artist's Work Makes 'Top 10 Most Memorable' List

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 16:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2015) —  A piece of art by Ebony G. Patterson, an associate professor in painting at the University of Kentucky School of Art and Visual Studies, was named to "David Ebony's Top 10 Most Memorable Artworks of 2014." The managing editor of Art in America praised Patterson's "…wata marassa-beyond the bladez," currently on display as part of "Prospect.3" in New Orleans.

 

In the article, Ebony called Patterson "one of the bright new stars showcased in 'Prospect.3.'" The composition selected by Ebony is a mixed media work combining painting and assemblage. The piece is part of a series of works that explores ideas around visibility/invisibility, beauty, violence and access.

 

"Prospect" New Orleans was conceived in the tradition of the great international exhibitions to showcase new artistic practices from around the world and contribute to the cultural economy of New Orleans. The idea to mount a large-scale international art biennial came to Dan Cameron during his first post-Katrina visit to New Orleans. With the potential opportunities, Cameron decided it was the ideal place and time to launch such a venture, and in 2007, with seed money from philanthropist Toby Devan Lewis, Prospect New Orleans came to fruition. 

 

Prior to being selected for "P.3" last fall, Patterson has been included in notable group exhibitions at Brooklyn Museum, Bass Museum, National Gallery of Jamaica and Studio Museum in Harlem. Her show credits include "Gold" (Miami , Florida); The "Jamaica Biennial" ; "Aruba Biennial"; "Caribbean Crossroads" (New York, Florida); "Black Gossamer," at Glass Curtain Gallery, at Columbia College (Chicago); "...until you see them," at Monique Meloche Gallery; and her first national museum show "dy/nas/ty," at the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art in spring 2014. Patterson will participate in several select shows at notable venues in 2015, including exhibitions at John Michael Kholer Art Center (Sheboygan, Wisconsin), Havana Biennale (Cuba), Seattle Art Museum and the Contemporary Art Center (New Orleans).

 

Outside of the gallery, Patterson's work has also been published in numerous publications such as The New York Times, Frieze Magazine, Huffington Post, Art Nexus, Art Papers and the International Review of African-American Art. 

 

A native of Kingston, Jamaica, Patterson earned her bachelor's degree in painting at the Edna Manley College for Visual and Performing Arts and a master's degree in printmaking and drawing from the Sam Fox College of Design and Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis. In 2013, she was named to Huffington Post's "Top 30 Black Artists Under 40." That same year, Patterson was the first visual artist to be awarded the Rex Nettleford Fellowship in Cultural Studies, which is presented to a Caribbean resident under the age of 35 who has shown excellence in that field. In 2014, Patterson was awarded the the Aaron Matalon Award for the best submission in the 2014 Jamaica Biennal.

 

Patterson has been teaching painting and mixed media at UK since 2007. To see more of Patterson’s artwork, or to learn more about her, visit her website at ebonygpatterson.com.

 

The UK School of Art and Visual Studies in the UK College of Fine Arts is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of art studioart history and visual studies, and art education.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK CAER Hosts Energy Fair for Elementary Students

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 16:03

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 16, 2015) — The University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) hosted an Energy Fair on campus last month for 271 fourth and fifth graders from Russell Cave, Yates and Cassidy Elementary Schools in Lexington. The fair provided the students with opportunities to meet scientists, learn about different forms of energy, participate in hands-on experiments, and even tour UK's campus. 

 

In addition to CAER, represenatives from the UK Chapter of the Society of Mining Engineers, Fayette County Public Schools Energy and Sustainability, Bluegrass Community and Technical College, Kentucky Geological Survey, and Bluegrass Energy provided interactive stations for the students.

 

"The Energy Fair trip was a tremendous success," said Josh Radner, a science teacher at Yates Elementary. "Our students were thrilled to meet UK students and researchers who are using the energy science we study in the classroom to address 21st century problems. The event and our subsequent campus tour made a huge impression on our students, many of whom had never visited a college or university campus before."

 

Pratham Desai, a fourth grader at Cassidy who attended the fair, peddled a bicycle to activate lightbulbs, which he described as his favorite part. Desai is a member of the Science Club at Cassidy, where researchers from CAER have been visiting once a week to teach the students about solar panels, electricity, biofuels, motors, and electromagnets. 

 

"They teach us about different things, like how to save energy and how electricity is generated," Desai said. "Today's fair taught me that energy can do a lot of work for you, without you having to do it."

 

Collin Harrison, a fourth grader at Russell Cave, said the fair helped him better understand what he has already been learning in school.

 

"We're looking at different kinds of energy and how carbon dioxide and different types of energy work, and what you can do with it," said Harrison. "In school we're actually making inventions that use energy. This fair gave me a lot of ideas for things I can do."

 

Harrison's favorite part of the day was watching UK chemistry professor John Selegue perform chemical experiments with balloons.

 

"He had a stick with fire on the top, and there was a balloon that he filled with different chemicals. So when he put the fire in the balloon, there were different reactions."

 

"I can easily imagine that this will be remembered by one or more of our students as the moment when they realized that they wanted to grow up to be a scientist," said Radner.

 

The fair also gave UK students an opportunity to work with the elementary students. Brett Criswell, an assistant professor in STEM Education in the UK College of Education, had all 24 students from his Elementary Science Methods course participate in the fair.

 

"This is part of our efforts to increase our students' exposure to informal science learning while also supporting STEM outreach work that is occruing across the university and Lexington community," Criswell said.

 

Christine Stenzel, a senior elementary education major, is one of the students who helped at the fair.

 

"I saw so many things I cannot wait to apply to my classroom one day," Stenzel said. "There were many instances when a student experienced a 'light bulb' moment in their mind - when a concept actually clicked with them.  These moments are so special to me because I was able to really witness learning in so many of these students and see how much they enjoyed it."

Book Sheds New Light on Infamous Lexington Madam

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 15:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2015) — Historian Thomas D. Clark often claimed that Lexington long entertained an “infatuation” with Belle Brezing. In truth, there is little known about this alluring and notorious brothel keeper. Secrecy was a moral code in her sequestered world of prostitution, even though the trade operated openly in the Lexington neighborhood surrounding what is now Eastern Street in downtown’s east end. Today, that sense of allure continues to draw people into her fold just as it did over a century ago.

 

In University Press of Kentucky's "Madame Belle: Sex, Money, and Influence in a Southern Brothel," former Lexington Herald-Leader turf writer, University of Kentucky alumnus and part-time instructor in the UK Department of History Maryjean Wall, sheds new light on the tantalizing true story of vice and power in the Gilded Age South as told through the life and times of the notorious Miss Belle. After years on the streets and in an upscale bordello run out of a former residence of Mary Todd Lincoln, Belle Brezing borrowed enough money to set up her own brothel. She leveraged that first house and her early connections with wealthy patrons to purchase the more suitably ostentatious 59 Megowan Street. Here, on any twilit evening in Lexington, it was common to see fashionable international travelers, horsemen, and civic leaders entering the elegant house.

 

The well-heeled nature of Brezing's establishment allowed it to become a social hangout for the men who controlled the economy, politics and horse industries of Kentucky. Her vaunted secrecy and discretion with such powerful figures often paid dividends, most notably when she was quietly pardoned by Kentucky Governor Luke Blackburn for keeping a “bawdy house.”

 

By the end of the early 1900s, Lexington hardly resembled its former self. For Brezing the end was near as progressive movements sought to eliminate “all un-Godly activities,” including gambling, alcohol and prostitution. Many of her competitors never believed anti-prostitution efforts would gain enough support to make a difference. Brezing, however, could see the writing on the wall and closed the doors on her operation for good in 1917.

 

From the time Brezing closed her business until her death in 1940, the once-enterprising madam lived out her retirement as a recluse in her crumbling, ivy-covered mansion. Upon her passing, though, evidence of Brezing’s notoriety was made clear when the Lexington Herald’s entire run of 19,000 newspaper copies containing its remembrance of Brezing sold out by 10 a.m. that Tuesday morning. News of her death also reached national levels with an obituary in Time magazine. Her renown was further secured for future generations when she was widely credited as Margaret Mitchell’s inspiration for Madam Belle Watling in ”Gone With the Wind."

 

Wall’s account of Belle Brezing is more than a simple biography. It presents a case study in how concepts of morality — and the city of Lexington — have changed over time as well as a glimpse into the life of a remarkable woman whose shrewd sense of business allowed her to infiltrate the highest circles of power.

 

To this day, Brezing's notoriety lives on in the Bluegrass. "This is not a case of Lexington finally recognizing Belle. She has always been recognized as one of this community’s memorable characters," Wall said. "People who recalled her in life continued to mention her after her death, recognizing her for the legendary character she was. Through subsequent decades, venues in this community have hosted a variety of events ranging from a Standardbred race named for Belle to a Belle Brezing bed race run for charity on downtown streets."

 

Maryjean Wall served as the turf writer for the Lexington Herald-Leader for 35 years. Wall, who earned her doctorate at UK, is also the author of "How Kentucky Became Southern: A Tale of Outlaws, Horse Thieves, Gamblers, and Breeders." Wall researched many materials related to Belle Brezing housed in the UK Special Collections Research Center.

 

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that now includes all of the state universities, five private colleges and two historical societies. Led by Director Stephen Wrinn, its editorial program focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production and marketing departments of the press are found at UK, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

Gatton Offers Business Fundamentals Program for Students

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 14:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2015) — In the 21st Century, all students increasingly need to possess a working knowledge of business concepts in order to be successful and grow their careers.

 

This summer, nonbusiness students will have the opportunity to participate in a noncredit Business Fundamentals Certificate Program through the Don and Cathy Jacobs Executive Education Center, part of the University of Kentucky's Gatton College of Business and Economics. The course of instruction will introduce business fundamentals and principles that will be helpful to students and better prepare them for their future careers. The program will be held May 11-29, 2015.

 

For more detailed information and to register, visit the Executive Education Center website: http://gatton.uky.edu/eec/Content.asp?PageName=EECBF

 

This three-week program covers a range of topics including macroeconomics, micro-economics, strategy, marketing, accounting and finance, operations and supply chain management, and organizational behavior and human resources management. The program is presented as a small group experience and is taught by 12 expert professors. While this certificate is noncredit and cannot be applied to a degree program, it does serve to introduce business concepts to students outside of the normal business school curriculum and is a strong resume-enhancer for the job market.

 

The Business Fundamentals Certificate Program will cover different material each week:

·         Week One focuses on macroeconomics and strategy

·         Week Two focuses on marketing, financial accounting, managerial accounting, risk management and control, and personal investment management

·         Week Three focuses on operations management, supply chain management, organizational behavior and human resources management

 

The program closes with a certificate ceremony to be held at 5 p.m. Friday, May 29, 2015.

 

"We believe that a lot of students who are not typically exposed to business through their normal course of study will find this program gives them the tools they need to be more confident and articulate when seeking a job and will give them a jump start towards success after graduating," said Joe Labianca, director of the Don and Cathy Jacobs Executive Education Center. "We're providing the most important aspects of these increasingly popular 'summer business bootcamp' programs at a fraction of the cost, taught by our expert faculty, and delivered right here on campus."

 

The fee for the Business Fundamentals Certificate Program will be discounted if students register for the program by March 1, 2015. The program at the discounted fee will be $1,800. After the March 1 deadline, the price will increase to $2,000.

 

For additional information about the program, you also can call 800-284-6407 or email eec.ed@uky.edu.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Carl Nathe, carl.nathe@uky.edu, 859-257-3200; Jordan Mason, jordan.mason19@uky.edu, 502-851-2260.

 

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Since its founding in 1865, the University of Kentucky has been dedicated to improving people's lives through excellence in education, research and creative work, service, and health care as Kentucky's flagship institution and one of the nation's top land grant universities. Please join us in celebrating the university's 150 year storied history and help us build on that tradition of success as part of UK's sesquicentennial celebration through 2015. Visit uknow.uky.edu/sesquicentennial to access UK sesquicentennial news, in addition to archived news stories and announcements. Keep up with UK sesquicentennial activities on social media by looking for #UK150.

VIDEO: President Capilouto "sees promise." for UK in 2015

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 17:37

 

 

Video Produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing.  To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click the "thought bubble" icon in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2015) — As we start a new year and a new semester at the University of Kentucky, President Eli Capilouto has a special message for students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends.

Shelton Named Finalist in Knight Cities Challenge

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 17:36

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2015) — Abigail Shelton, a University of Kentucky freshman Honors student from Mount Washington, Kentucky, has been selected as a finalist in the first Knight Cities Challenge, a national call for new ideas to make 26 communities around the country more vibrant places to live and work. The program is funded by the Knight Foundation, and the 26 communities are all locations where the Knight family once owned newspapers, including Lexington, home of the Lexington Herald-Leader.

 

Shelton, a computer science major in the UK College of Engineering, is one of 126 finalists. There were more than 7,000 submissions from many public and government organizations, design experts, urban planning organizations, and individuals.

 

The challenge asked applicants to answer the question: what's your best idea to make cities more successful?

 

Shelton's submission was on behalf of her UK Honors class, "Citizen Kentucky" taught by associate professor Buck Ryan. The idea is "Fancy Lex," which aims to inspire Lexington residents to become involved in the city by hosting an event similar to the annual Fancy Farm picnic in Western Kentucky. "Fancy Lex" would give Lexington residents an opportunity to meet local leaders while enjoying the city's finest food, music and local goods.

 

Shelton said that recent election research has made her and her peers question their generation's apathy toward civic engagement.

 

"What happened to old-fashioned parades, stump speeches, community picnics, and city gatherings at the courthouse?" Shelton said. "We hope to inspire younger generations to follow the steps of their grandparents and great-grandparents by doing civically engaged things, such as meeting their representatives, attending public forums, or donating time to charities. We hope to learn and foster growth to our generation’s unseen capacity to understand and engage in public life; ultimately, building a greater sense of community, a dying virtue."

 

While honored to be selected as a finalist, Shelton stressed that she did not come up with the proposal alone. Her fellow students Courtney Eaton, Clay Thornton and Scotty Reams, helped to develop the idea.

 

"I have never attended our inspiration for the event (Fancy Farm), but Clay has, and he has lived in Lexington his entire life, so he was a huge contributor to the development of our idea and writing of the proposal," Shelton said. "After we had a better idea of what 'Fancy Lex' would be, we got in touch with Lexington Mayor Jim Gray and his staff, including senior advisor Scott Shapiro. He loved our idea, and was able to help us with the details of it."

 

Winners of the Knight Cities Challenge, who will receive a share of $5 million, will be announced this spring.

 

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation supports transformational ideas that promote quality journalism, advance media innovation, engage communities and foster the arts. 

UK Hosts Public Forums, Opportunities to Provide Input and Shape Transportation Master Plan

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 17:29

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2015) The University of Kentucky has begun work on a Transportation Master Plan aimed at improving access and mobility to, from and around campus for all members of the UK community.

 

As part of the planning process, the university is seeking input and feedback on both the challenges facing the university in terms of transportation, parking and mobility, as well as ideas about potential solutions.

 

Sasaki, a Boston-based planning firm, was selected to develop the UK Transportation Master Plan. Working with Sasaki consultants to ensure integration with the overall Campus Master Plan, the university will hold two forums open to the public on the following dates:

  • Wednesday, Jan. 28, from 9:30-11 a.m. in the Center Theater in the UK Student Center
  • Thursday, Jan. 29, from 2:30-4 p.m. in the Pav A Auditorium at UK HealthCare's Chandler Hospital

Additionally, community members are encouraged to visit the Transportation Master Plan website to receive updates and submit feedback.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Sarah Geegan, (859) 257-5365; sarah.geegan@uky.edu

 

Sidewalk on Avenue of Champions, From Roselle Hall to South Limestone Closed Until August

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 16:20
LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2015) As a part of the Limestone Park I construction project, the sidewalk along Avenue of Champions from the west side of Roselle Hall to South Limestone has been closed.  

 

The sidewalk and one lane of Avenue of Champions are currently closed due to utility work in that traffic lane. The traffic lane and adjacent bike lane are scheduled to re-open Friday, Jan. 16; however, the sidewalk will not re-open when the street re-opens Friday.

 

The sidewalk will remain closed until August 2015 in the interest of safety. Click here to view a map of the area.

 

This project is part of the largest revitalization of campus housing taking place in all of public higher education — a public-private partnership with EdR, a national leader in the development of student housing.

 

Learn more about UK's campus transformation here.

 

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Sarah Geegan, (859) 257-5365; sarah.geegan@uky.edu

Daniel Hernandez Exhibit Explores 'Genesis' From Bible to Sega

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 16:17

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2015) — The University of Kentucky School of Art and Visual Studies has welcomed artist Daniel Hernandez to campus for an exhibition and residency. The public is invited to experience Hernandez’s work as well through "Genesis," an exhibition presented at UK’s Tuska Center for Contemporary Art, located in the Fine Arts Building. "Genesis" will have a closing reception beginning 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 12, at Tuska. Both the exhibition and reception are free and open to the public.

 

The exhibition "Genesis" opened Jan. 10 and will close Feb. 12. In conjunction with the show, the artist will present a free public lecture at 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 12, at the Briggs Theatre in the Fine Arts Building.

 

"Genesis" is defined as “the coming into being of something; the origin,” but like many words that can be used as both noun and proper noun, what it communicates depends largely on its usage.

 

Two of usages of the word genesis, and the relationship that exists between them, are particularly interesting and relevant to Hernandez’s body of work. In the first, "Genesis" is the title of a religious text. In the second, "Genesis" is the Sega video game console that hit the home gaming market in the late 1980s. While these two usages come from very different traditions, they share some common ground.

 

On a basic level both signify a type of narrative device. In the case of the religious text, the Book of Genesis houses the creation stories that are part of the Christian tradition; Noah’s Ark, Adam and Eve, etc. Similarly, the Sega Genesis game console is a vehicle for narrative games like "Golden Axe," "Streets of Rage," "Altered Beast" and others.

 

On another level, both of the narrative collections that are associated with these usages of "Genesis" utilize the supernatural and mythic as a central and reoccurring theme. Hernandez admits that these comparisons may be a stretch, but he says that within the space that is created by embracing such eccentric relationships there exists interesting possibilities for artistic exploration.
 

Hernandez was born in San Diego, California, in 1977. He received a bachelor's degree in 2000 from Northwest Missouri State and a master's degree in 2002 from American University. Hernandez’s paintings explore the visual dialogue between religion, mythology and pop culture. 

 

Artwork by Hernandez has been presented in two solo exhibitions at Kim Foster Gallery (New York City), where he is currently represented. He has also had solo shows in galleries in Ohio, Michigan and Arkansas. His work has been included in numerous group exhibitions including shows at Shizaru Gallery (London, United Kingdom); Southern Ohio Museum (Portsmouth, Ohio); Cindy Rucker Gallery (New York City); Strohl Art Center (Chautauqua, New York); Contemporary Arts Center (Las Vegas, Nevada); Lehman College Art Gallery (Brooklyn, New York); Westport Art Center (Westport, Connecticut); and Riffe Gallery (Columbus, Ohio).

 

Hernandez is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Art at the University of Toledo. He was awarded the Bellinger Award at the Chautauqua Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Art in 2010 and 2013, and was selected for an Ohio Arts Council Individual Excellency Award in 2011.

 

The UK School of Art and Visual Studies in the UK College of Fine Arts is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of art studioart history and visual studies, and art education.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Central Bank Partnering With UK-UofL Executive MBA

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 16:11

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2015) — Central Bank has committed to enriching the experience of University of Kentucky - University of Louisville Executive MBA (EMBA) Program participants by sponsoring special events in 2015 that will bring in C-suite executives to speak with students in small group settings. C-suite refers to a corporation's most senior level executives.

 

Central Bank's $20,000 commitment for the coming year includes sponsoring two series of events:

 

Four-Part Friday Dinner Series

This dinner speaker series will introduce C-suite executives selected by the universities to EMBA program participants across four select Friday nights in 2015. The speaker series will alternate between local restaurants in Louisville and Lexington.

 

Kickoff Dinner and Graduation Reception

The Graduation Reception celebrates the 2014-15 program participants' degree completion. The reception will include EMBA participants and their spouses, and will be held in Lexington in December 2015. Central Bank will also sponsor the EMBA Kickoff Dinner for the 2015-16 cohort, which is currently being recruited to begin in August 2015, in Louisville. The first kickoff dinner was held at Papa John's Cardinal Stadium and featured Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer as guest speaker.

 

"Central Bank is delighted to partner with these two great universities to provide these enhanced opportunities for participants in this exciting, top-quality program," said James Clay Smith, president of Central Bank of Jefferson County.

 

The EMBA program, aimed at rising executives from regional organizations, draws upon the experience and expertise of outstanding faculty from both UK's Gatton College of Business and Economics and UofL's College of Business. It features Friday and Saturday classes on every other weekend, with sessions split between the UK campus in Lexington and the UofL campus in Louisville. The program's 46-credit-hour curriculum includes 22 hours on management, six on current business issues, four each on accounting, economics, finance and marketing, and two on quantitative methods. This first group of executives will graduate from the 17-month program in December 2015.

 

While the initial agreement is for one year, Central Bank officials said they will evaluate the speaker series and other special events with EMBA program leadership on an ongoing basis, with the possibility that the arrangement could be extended into the future.

 

"We are grateful for Central Bank’s wonderful support in further enhancing our EMBA,” said Joe Labianca, Gatton Endowed Chair in Management, director of the Don and Cathy Jacobs Executive Education Center, and co-director of the Executive MBA Program. "The ability to bring in highly accomplished speakers to engage with the students adds another layer of quality and depth to our program both by exposing our program participants to the executives, while affording executives from important regional organizations an up-close view of our program’s quality."

 

U of L's Executive Director of MBA Programs, Career Management, and Public Relations Vernon Foster added, "Our students already are setting a very high standard for this program. Central Bank's generosity will enable us to build upon our strong start."

 

UofL and UK officials have said the program will boost Kentucky’s business climate by providing an advanced education to emerging leaders who might otherwise leave the area.

 

As mentioned earlier, the recruiting process is underway for the next EMBA group. For more details, see http://execmba.biz/ or contact Joe Labianca at 859-257-3741, or, Vernon Foster at 502-852-2855.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200/carl.nathe@uky.edu; Michelle Lowe, 859-257-1838/michelle.lowe1@uky.edu.

Contest Offers Prizes for Beating Tobacco Addiction

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 15:42

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2015) – A new year can entice people to think about making resolutions and resolutions often involve improving one's health, like losing weight or quitting smoking. According to Ellen Hahn, professor at the UK College of Nursing and co-director of UK's Tobacco-free Campus Initiative, smoking is not simply a habit as it is so often referred to; it is a nicotine addiction. Tobacco smoke leads to an estimated 10,000 deaths every year in the state of Kentucky alone.

 

If you are an employee who smokes on the University of Kentucky campus and have been considering giving up smoking, now is your time, and there is a chance to win a substantial amount of cash. The UK Tobacco-free Campus Initiative, along with UK HealthCare, are sponsoring the Quit and Win Contest as a way to encourage UK employees to improve their health and quality of life. The contest, which runs from Jan. 16 to Feb. 16, is open only to UK faculty and staff, including employees of an affiliated corporation, who are 18 years of age or older and current tobacco users who have smoked cigarettes in the past 30 days. 

 

Debbie DeGonia, an Eastern State Hospital employee for nearly 10 years, started smoking 28 years ago when she worked at the Fayette County Jail.

 

"You were able to smoke inside buildings back then," DeGonia said. "I was saved from a lot of hostile inmates wanting to fight by the sharing of a cigarette. People would rather smoke than fight. The problem was I kept the habit after I left my job at the jail."

 

DeGonia's doctor has requested that she stop smoking for several years after she started noticing shortness of breath as a result of her smoking. She says she has considering stopping on several occasions but quickly ran out of motivation. When she saw the advertisement for the Quit and Win Contest, she knew she had found the motivation that might see her through to quitting for good.

 

"I get to quit smoking, have better breath, save over a hundred dollars a month, have a fresher smelling house and car, and I make my doctor happy. On top of all that I have a chance to win a nice little sum of money. I just can't pass this opportunity up. So February 16th I may be $1,000 richer or at least I will beat that nasty habit."

 

News of the Quit and Win Contest was first announced on UKNow in November. Contest prizes include one first place prize of $1,000; two second place prizes of $500 each; and two third place prizes of $250. Individuals can enroll in the contest through an online enrollment form. Individuals without internet access can enroll via phone by calling Amanda Fallin at 859-317-1673. Participants must verify their smoking status through exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) monitoring before the start of the contest. 

 

Registration and CO monitoring stations are set up across campus in various locations from Jan. 12 to Jan. 16. Participants will be required to sign up for a specific date, time and location to complete CO monitoring. Entrants who complete the online registration as well as the CO monitoring will receive an official notification of entry into the contest.

 

To be eligible to win the contest, participants should refrain from smoking and other tobacco use for the 30-day duration of the contest. Participants who wish to enter to win a prize must sign a document attesting that they did not use any tobacco products in the past 30 days (including traditional cigarettes, e-cigarettes, chew, pipes, cigars, hookah or waterpipe smoking, snus, snuff, etc.). In addition, participants who attest to not smoking must verify their CO in person between Feb. 16 and Feb. 19. 

 

Media Contact: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu 

Nursing Dean Gives First State of the College Address

Tue, 01/13/2015 - 09:14

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2015) – In her first State of the College address as dean of the University of Kentucky College of Nursing, Janie Heath told faculty and staff when people hear Kentucky in the days and weeks to come, they’ll think of nursing excellence as often as they do basketball. Citing an impressive list of College innovations and firsts in nursing, including the first doctorate (PhD) program in the region and the first Doctor of Nursing Program (DNP) in the nation, Heath said,  “It is time to start moving off of the #21 spot on US News & World Report’s rankings to the #10 spot for graduate nursing programs.  We have the right talent and it is the right time to make a significant impact in lives of Kentuckians and beyond."

 

In discussing her thoughts and plans for the future, Heath made reference to three key areas of focus for the journey to top 10: fiscal health, operational health and structural health. While each identified areas for improvement in processes, academic program growth and resource management, the opportunities were abundantly clear. “I have never been in an environment with so much academic nursing strength,” Heath said. “It will be a joy to see how we test new innovative models of education, expand our research portfolio, grow nursing faculty practice and ramp up our philanthropic efforts."

 

"That’s not to say the road will be easy,especially given today’s fiscal challenges. No doubt there will be some twists and turns. Unfortunately, there is no GPS that guarantees a way to success. We have to be nimble and ready to adjust and move forward as we learn together, refocus together and move forward together.”

 

Heath emphasized, “Although this is a general roadmap, not the tactics—my hope is to give you a sense about our direction and to assure you that my vision for the College is a shared vision, one that builds on the success and excellence of this College and all that it stands for.”

 

Heath said that as dean her overriding goal is to create healthy working and learning environments, build sustainable relationships, focus on measurable and reportable outcomes and ensure meaningful impact. “It will take all of us working together as partners to successfully achieve quality improvement processes at the College, advance nursing science and graduate more students that improve patient–family centered outcomes, implement care coordination and care transition and lower costs."

 

The College’s mission is solid and the partnerships and opportunities are there to move the needle on health and wellness inside and outside Kentucky," Heath said. “We must strengthen our communication efforts as an institution and as individuals to get the word out. We want everyone to know about our nursing excellence and the impact it’s having in the region, in the nation and around the world for education, research, practice and service.”

 

Media Contact: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu 

Spring Semester Move-in Will Impact Parking on UK Campus

Mon, 01/12/2015 - 17:22

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 13, 2015) — University of Kentucky residence halls opened at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 11. Spring semester move-in, which continues until Wednesday, Jan. 14, will impact parking in the following areas:

  • Martin Luther King Boulevard:  The city bagged the meters on the east side of Martin Luther King Boulevard with “No Parking, Loading Zone only” signs effective Sunday, Jan. 11 through Wednesday, Jan. 14. 
  • Lexington Avenue:  The city bagged the meters on the west side of Lexington Avenue, with “No Parking, Loading Zone only” signs effective Sunday, Jan. 11 through Wednesday, Jan. 14.
  • Avenue of Champions:  The city bagged the meters in front of Roselle Hall with “No Parking, Loading Zone only” signs effective Sunday, Jan. 11 through Wednesday, Jan. 14.
  • Woodland Avenue:  The city posted “No Parking, Unloading Zone only” signs in the area in front of Woodland Glen, effective Sunday at 2 p.m. through Wednesday, Jan. 14, at 5 p.m.

In addition, there will be one tree-lined sidewalk open between Hilltop Avenue and Woodland Avenue in the complex mall area. There will be an additional sidewalk open between University Drive and the complex mall area.

 

Signage will indicate the entrance (at The 90) and the exit (onto University Drive) for the Complex Mall area.

 

Unloading areas at the following locations will be monitored by the UK Police Department Tuesday, from 9:30 a.m. - 3 p.m., and UKPD will enforce the "30-minute unloading zone only" restrictions:

  • Woodland Avenue, along the front of Woodland Glen I and II
  • Woodland Avenue lot (R10)
  • Kirwan-Blanding mall entrance (at The 90)
  • In the mall to direct traffic to the exit (onto University Drive)

Click here for more information about spring semester 2015 move-in.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Sarah Geegan, (859) 257-5365; sarah.geegan@uky.edu

 

 

OLLI Open House Showcases Membership Benefits for Seniors

Mon, 01/12/2015 - 17:09

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 13, 2015) -- The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, based at the University of Kentucky, will host a new member open house on Tuesday, Jan. 13, at Tates Creek Christian Church. 

 

During the open house, seniors interested in participating in learning opportunities through OLLI are invited to meet with course instructors and others who are exploring lifelong learning opportunities. Refreshments will be provided and OLLI staff will be available to answer questions about the spring catalogue of courses and the new online registration option. The event will be held from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at 3150 Tates Creek Road. Registration for spring courses opens at 1 p.m. 

 

OLLI membership costs $25 annually. The open house will be cancelled if Fayette County Schools are closed due to weather. For more information, visit www.uky.edu/OLLI

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu 

 

UK Pilot Study Tests Program to Reduce Hospital Readmissions

Mon, 01/12/2015 - 15:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 13, 2015) — Within 30 days of discharge, 20 percent of fee-for-service Medicare patients are readmitted to the hospital. The frequency of readmission for Medicare patients costs the nation an estimated $17 billion annually, but research suggests 75 percent of these readmission cases are preventable.

 

The University of Kentucky Department of Family and Community Medicine, in partnership with St. Claire Regional Medical Center in Morehead, Kentucky, and Kentucky HomePlace recently launched a pilot study to evaluate the impact community health workers have in reducing hospital readmission rates. Using a multidisciplinary model of transitional care, the one-year study will attempt to reduce 30-day readmission rates for high-risk hospital patients in Eastern Kentucky.

 

The study's goals include assessing the 30-day readmission risk during client intake; addressing psychosocial and health determinants of high-risk patients before and after discharge through assistance from a community health worker; and monitoring the impact of the community health worker intervention based on measures such as compliance with discharge orders, follow-up appointments and readmission rates.

 

According to Dr. Roberto Cardarelli, chief of Community Medicine in the UK Department of Family and Community Medicine and principal investigator for the study, a range of socioeconomic and personal factors influence hospital readmission rates. Personal circumstances influencing readmission include accessibility to community health providers, unstable living environments, costs of medication, lack of transportation, and failure to comply with discharge orders.

 

Preceding research on hospital readmission reduction programs indicates a patient navigator, such as a community health worker, can improve the patient's quality of life and health outcomes, consequently reducing 30-day readmission rates. While the study is based in Appalachia, Cardarelli said its findings could have implications for both rural and urban settings.

 

"Nobody is usually looking into these social aspects," Cardarelli said. "Why did the patient not pick up their medicine? Well, it's because they have no money. Those subtle things are often overlooked but can make a big impact."

 

Lay community health workers, who will receive training from Kentucky HomePlace, will act as a link between discharged patients and local health care services. In the first four to six months of the study, community health workers will collect baseline data from high-risk readmission patients at St. Claire Regional Medical Center. The workers will conduct patient wellness needs assessments to measures risks such as depression, health literacy, adherence and compliance risks, support, social factors and financial barriers to care. They will follow-up with patients four weeks after discharge to review the client's status.

 

In the second phase of the program, community health workers will intervene with follow-up care for consenting patients discharged from the hospital. After conducting the wellness needs assessment, they will work individually with patients to develop a client-centered care plan. Post-discharge, the health workers will monitor the patient's progress with reminders for follow-up visits and assistance accessing community health resources.

 

"Essentially they will navigate patients to identify social barriers," Cardarelli said of the community health workers. "They will help address and find community resources, and contact patients to see how they are doing, if they are making their follow-up appointments."

 

UK Family and Community Medicine and St. Claire Regional Medical Center launched the program last fall. The study is supported by a grant from PassPort Health Insurance company and is in partnership with St. Claire Regional Medical Center and Kentucky Homeplace in the Center for Excellence in Rural Health, which has provided community health workers in 27 Eastern Kentucky counties for the past 20 years. 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

UK Alum Only Sees Black and White in Role as NCAA Basketball Referee

Fri, 01/09/2015 - 15:57

 

In-game footage Courtesy of UK Athletics.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 12, 2015) — John Hampton is a former UK Baseball player.  He graduated with a business degree from the Gatton College of Business and Economics.  He lives minutes away from campus.  He serves as vice president of an insurance agency in Lexington.  He even hails from Harrison County, home of famed former UK Basketball Coach Joe B. Hall.

 

On paper, you would think his college basketball allegiances would be squarely with his alma mater.

 

They aren’t.  They simply can’t be.   You see John Hampton is a referee for NCAA Men’s Basketball.

 

“When you wear this uniform, it takes the fan out of you,” said Hampton.

 

In fact, when the 20-year veteran of the basketball referee world watches games on television, he doesn’t pay attention to the dunks, three-point swishes or ball movement.  He focuses on officials in black and white. 

 

“I watch the guys working the game,“ Hampton said.  “Even with NBA games, you find yourself watching the referees.”

 

Hampton calls refereeing a part-time job.  His “real” job started immediately after graduation from UK in 1991 when he entered the insurance world.  As he began his professional career, he also started his career as a referee.

 

“My dad was a referee for many, many years, so I grew up going all over Central and Eastern Kentucky watching him referee,” Hampton said.  “So when I graduated from UK I immediately got into the referee business, started going to camps, refereeing locally at high schools and then moved on up.”

 

These days, Hampton warms up for the season by refereeing University of Kentucky scrimmages and exhibition games before hitting the road (and sky) to call games mostly in the Southeastern Conference (SEC), along with the Big 12, Conference USA, Sunbelt and Ohio Valley conferences. 

 

“Being a graduate of UK and a Lexington resident, I never call UK games,” Hampton said.  “The only games I do are the exhibition games, and it’s a great feeling to referee in Rupp Arena in front of family and friends.” 

 

He is an independent contractor who spends most weeks in the winter taking the first flight out of Lexington on game days to ensure that he makes it to the games with plenty of time to spare.

 

“We are required to be on the 6 a.m. flight every day we work a game,” Hampton said. 

 

After a quick rest in a hotel, he and his fellow officials meet at the arena and warm up, just like the teams do.  During the game, he definitely works up a sweat.

 

“They estimate you run a total of six miles per game, Hampton said. 

 

He says the hardest call to make is when the ball goes out-of-bounds, followed closely by trying to differentiate between a blocked shot and goal tending.   Hampton admits all of these calls are even more challenging today than they were when he first began officiating two decades ago.

 

“When you look at the players when I started 20 years ago and you compare their size, height and skill level to today’s players, the difference is amazing,” said Hampton.  “There’s a lot of energy, strength and talent and they’re going against each other, which creates some matchups and subsequently tough plays for us to referee.” 

 

Fortunately, he says technological advances such as television monitors are helping.

 

“Being able to go to the monitor, especially in late-game situations is great,”  He said.  “If you miss a call early in the game, the teams have a chance to recover, but it it’s late, they don’t.”

 

Hampton explains that the fact nearly every game is televised or recorded helps officials strive for perfection. 

 

“Our goal is to beat the tape; you’ve got to be right on film, and then your work is defended,” Hampton said. 

 

Each season, Hampton hopes to foster an atmosphere where two teams can come together to play without having to worry about the quality of the officiating.

 

“Coaches quite frankly are paranoid a lot of times when they go on the road, so when they see guys in the stripes that they trust and know, they relax and focus on coaching their game,” he said.  “So that is one thing as a referee we really strive for — we want the coach to have faith and confidence in us, so when he sees you walk on the floor and his team is on the road, he feels good.”

 

In the end, it’s less about being a thorn in the fans’ side and more about communication. 

 

“The more mature and experienced I have become as a referee, I do more talking to kids, trying to tell them to stop something rather than just assess a technical foul, especially early in the game,” said Hampton.  “I try to talk to players, and even coaches.  Largely that is what the coaches want, they want to know that they can communicate with you in a professional way.”

 

So even though his part-time profession doesn’t allow him to be a fan in the Big Blue Nation, he can share his admiration for his alma mater as a whole.  It’s a feeling that washed over him after walking on campus one late autumn day in 2014. 

 

“Seeing how much construction is going on, and all of the students and all of the activity, it’s just really growing and it’s really neat to see all of the energy on campus now,” Hampton said.  “I’m really proud of the University of Kentucky, and when I think of my success in the business and basketball worlds, it all started here in 1986, so it means a lot to me.”

 

Watch other UK Alumni “see success.” stories at the playlist below:

 

 

 MEDIA CONTACT:  Amy Jones-Timoney, (859) 257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual UK Economic Outlook Conference is Feb. 3

Fri, 01/09/2015 - 14:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan.  12, 2015)  What impact might changing oil prices have on the U.S. and Kentucky economy? How will the aging population in the Commonwealth and across the nation affect labor markets? What industries are poised for growth and which are in decline? What effect will these changes have on employment and earnings as Kentucky moves through 2015?  

 

These and other vital topics will be in the spotlight Tuesday, Feb. 3, as the Don and Cathy Jacobs Executive Education Center at the University of Kentucky's Gatton College of Business and Economics, in cooperation with Commerce Lexington, Inc. and The Lane Report, hosts the 26th Annual Economic Outlook Conference.

 

The Lexington Convention Center is the event site with registration and continental breakfast from 8 to 8:30 a.m., and the conference itself from 8:30 to noon. 

 

Expert speakers and presenters this year include:

 

·         Christopher J. Waller, senior vice president and director of research at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. Waller is a former faculty member at the Gatton College. His principal research interests are monetary theory, political economy, and macroeconomic theory.

 

·         Jennifer A. Hunt, deputy assistant secretary for economic analysis at the U.S. Department of Treasury and former chief economist at the Department of Labor. Her research is on unemployment and unemployment policy, immigration, wage inequality, the science and engineering workforce, transition economics, crime, and corruption.

 

·         Christopher R. Bollinger, director of UK's Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) and Gatton Endowed Professor of Economics in the Gatton College. Bollinger will provide an overview of the economic outlook for 2015, highlighting the relationships between the local, state, and national economies.

 

·         Kenneth R. Troske, senior associate dean for administration, faculty and research and Sturgill Endowed Professor of Economics in the Gatton College. Troske's presentation will focus on the strengths and weaknesses of the Kentucky economy.

 

·         Merl Hackbart, director of UK's Martin School of Public Policy and Administration and Gatton Endowed Professor of Finance and Public Administration, will serve as conference moderator.

 

"This annual conference  provides an outstanding opportunity for business leaders and other interested citizens to hear from experts on a range of issues impacting our economy," said David W. Blackwell, dean of the Gatton College. "The event never fails to be compelling and extremely informative."

 

In addition to the presentation, this year’s schedule includes audience participation in the form of Q&A with the entire panel, followed by Q&A breakout sessions with each speaker toward the end of the program.  

 

Early registration is recommended for the 26th Annual Economic Outlook conference and can be done online. The registration fee of $115 includes continental breakfast and all materials.  For groups of five or more, a discounted registration fee of $100 per person is offered.

 

For more information, visit http://www.gatton.uky.edu/eec.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; carl.nathe@uky.edu.

New Employee Parking Lot Open; Lot Changes for South Campus

Fri, 01/09/2015 - 13:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 12, 2015)  The University of Kentucky openend a new employee parking lot on University Drive Jan. 10 as part of an ongoing effort to mitigate challenges associated with construction.

 

The newly created University Drive Lot is near the corner of University Drive and Huguelet Avenue, and has approximately 35 employee parking spaces. 

 

Additionally, UK Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) is making several lot designation changes in the South Campus area.

 

In late December 2014, work began on a bypass road connecting the area east of the new residence halls on South Campus to Woodland Avenue, necessitating changes to area parking lots. This construction affected a number of employee parking spaces in the Sports Center North Lot. The changes taking place this week are designed to mitigate the impact of these losses while balancing the parking needs in the area. 

 

To further accommodate the loss of employee parking spots to construction, the location of residential parking will be shifted, converting some existing residential spaces to employee. However, while the residential and employee areas are relocating, current residential permit holders will not experience any reduction in access to proximate residential parking spaces.

 

The changes include:

  • Two R3 residential parking areas — the Sports Center South Lot and the Small Sports Center Lot (adjacent to the tennis courts) — will transition to employee lots.
  • To counter this change, Complex Drive and the Sports Center Garage (PS #7) will be available to both R3 and R7 residential permit holders. 
  • The first floor of the Sports Center Garage will no longer be reserved for visitor parking and will be open to R3 and R7 residential permit parking.
  • Visitor parking will still be accommodated in the Sports Center Garage, but will be interspersed throughout the structure, rather than restricted to a specific area.

 

All Sports Center and Complex Drive changes were effective beginning Saturday, Jan. 10, 2015.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Sarah Geegan (859) 257-5365; sarah.geegan@uky.edu

College of Education's 'Teachers Who Made a Difference' Program Now Accepting Submissions

Fri, 01/09/2015 - 13:17

 

UK Women's Basketball Coach Matthew Mitchell Discusses Importance of Education and Teaching from UK College of Education on Vimeo. A transcript of the video can be found here.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 12, 2015) — In its 17th year, the University of Kentucky College of Education's Teachers Who Made a Difference program is now accepting submissions for the 2015 program.

 

UK women's basketball coach Matthew Mitchell is once again teaming up with the College of Education to offer this program that gives people an opportunity to thank a teacher, principal, professor, coach or other educator who has inspired and motivated them to succeed.

 

“Teaching is my job, teaching is my passion. And it is something that I love and hope to do the rest of my life,” said Mitchell, the 2015 Teachers Who Made a Difference spokesperson. “It is a tremendous thing to be a teacher.”

 

The program does not select winners from a pool of nominees. Rather, the College of Education created the program to provide individuals a means to express thanks to educators who have impacted their lives. Honorees can be from anywhere and do not have to be affiliated with UK; however, the number of honorees to be recognized is limited. Organizers ask that each nominator limit recognitions to one educator per year.

 

To honor an educator, complete the online form at https://www.coe.uky.edu/twmad/ or download the printable form to mail in. The deadline for submissions is March 16, 2015.

 

More than 1,800 teachers have been honored since the program’s inception. The Teachers Who Made a Difference program includes a special recognition event and reception attended by both the teachers and their nominators. This year's event will be held Saturday, April 18, at the UK Student Center's Great Hall. Nominees that are able to attend will enjoy a light continental breakfast at 9:30 a.m. and honored thereafter around 10 a.m. Those who cannot attend will receive their award by mail.

 

For more information, visit http://education.uky.edu/TWMAD or contact the UK College of Education Office of Advancement by phone at 859- 257-4014. 

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

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