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OUTspoken Event Planned for Wednesday Night Is Canceled

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 17:06

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 4, 2015) — The second annual OUTspoken event planned from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 4, in Memorial Hall has been canceled due to anticipated inclement weather.

 

 

Holmes Award Luncheon Rescheduled for March 12

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 15:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 4, 2015) — Due to the impending weather forecast, the Sarah Bennett Holmes Award Luncheon, originally scheduled for Thursday, March 5, has been rescheduled for Thursday, March 12, 2015 from 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m. in the Student Center Grand Ballroom

 

Because of the delay,  reservations have been re-opened through Monday, March 9. To make reservations, visit: http://www.uky.edu/womensforum/sbhal.html.

 

Coordinated by UK Women's Forum, the Sarah Bennett Holmes Award is granted annually to women working at UK who promote the growth and well-being of other women at the university and across the Commonwealth. Two awards are presented — one to a faculty member and one to a staff member.

 

The 2015 nominees are:

 

Faculty

·         Henrietta Bada-Ellzey, Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Behavior, College of Public Health

·         Ruth Bryan, Special Collections Research Center, UK Libraries

·         Rebecca Collins, Pediatrics, College of Medicine

·         Beth Goldstein, Education Policy Studies, College of Education

·         Marty Henton, School of Art and Visual Studies, College of Fine Arts

·         Beverly A. Hilton, UK Libraries

·         Elizabeth Oates, Radiology, College of Medicine

·         Melynda Price, College of Law

·         Pamela Remer, Educational, School, and Counseling Psychology, College of Education

·         Susan Smyth, Internal Medicine, College of Medicine

·         Anita Superson, Philosophy, College of Arts and Sciences

·         Alice Thornton, Internal Medicine Division of Infectious Diseases, College of Medicine

 

Staff

·         Joanne Brown, University Health Service (student health)

·         Evie Russell, Undergraduate Research

·         Elizabeth Snider, UK HealthCare Polk Dalton Clinic

·         Gaye Whalen, UK Women's Health - Obstetrics and Gynecology

·         Shane Winstead, Pharmacy Services

UK's Vanderford featured in Nature

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 13:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2015) – Nathan Vanderford, assistant director for research at the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center and assistant professor in the Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, has a featured article on graduate education in the March 5 edition of Nature. Nature is one of the most prominent and prestigious interdisciplinary scientific journals in the world.

 

Vanderford co-wrote an article titled, "Wanted: Information" with Viviane Callier from the Ronin Institute for Independent Scholarship. In the piece, Vanderford and Callier examine why recent doctoral graduates are having trouble obtaining jobs. They note that doctoral students, specifically those in the science and engineering fields, are not given enough information before obtaining a higher degree and also do not receive enough information about the job market while obtaining the degree.

 

According to the article, "those pursuing a Ph.D. need a more accurate picture of the academic and non-academic job markets and they need it well before they graduate."

 

Vanderford and Callier believe that with better information, students can better prepare to enter the job market and avoid common mistakes that leave them feeling both overqualified and unqualified for positions.

 

To view the full article, visit Nature online. 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

KNI Physician Helps Patients with Parkinson's Using Newly-Approved Drug

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 12:04

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2015) -- To date, a cure for Parkinson's disease remains elusive for the more than 50,000 Americans diagnosed yearly, despite decades of intensive study.  But a newly approved treatment that might help ease the symptoms of Parkinson's has shown remarkable promise.

 

Parkinson’s is a progressive disease caused by the death of dopamine-producing cells in the brain. While most people recognize a Parkinson's patient by their motor skill difficulties such as tremor, slowness and stiffness, the disease also gives rise to several non-motor types of symptoms such as sensory deficits, cognitive difficulties or sleep problems.

 

While doctors have a number of treatments available to help manage the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, the motor deficits that are the hallmarks of PD are also the nemesis of effective treatment, since the muscles that control digestion are also affected, making dosing -- both in terms of amount and timing -- challenging.

 

Compounding this challenge is the fact that medications lose effectiveness over time as cell death progresses. Although levodopa remains the “gold standard” to control motor deficits in the treatment of early stage PD, after four to six years of treatment with oral medications for Parkinson’s disease, about 40 percent of patients find those medications less effective overall, inconsistent in controlling muscle function, and accompanied by a bothersome side-effect called dyskinesia, or involuntary muscle movement. By nine years of treatment, about 90% will suffer these effects.

 

Dr. John Slevin, professor of Neurology and Vice Chair of Research at UK's Kentucky Neuroscience Institute, worked with an international team of investigators to explore the efficacy of continuous levodopa dosing using a specially developed gel called CLES (Duopa®) that is delivered directly into the small intestine by a portable infusion pump.  

"We were extremely pleased with the results," Slevin said.  “Patients with advanced PD treated via this new method demonstrated marked improvement in symptom fluctuations with reduced dyskinesia.“

 

According to Slevin, CLES's effectiveness is due in part to the fact that it results in more stable plasma concentrations of levodopa by delivering it directly to the small intestine, which bypasses issues of erratic gastric emptying and absorption caused by reduced muscular function inherent to PD.

 

"CLES has the potential to address a significant unmet need in this patient population with limited therapeutic options," Slevin added. 

 

The FDA approved CLES in January 2015. Because the safety and efficacy of levodopa is already established, this treatment has the potential to be fast-tracked for widespread use within the next 4-6 months.

 

"In fact, my first research patient is scheduled to switch to ongoing treatment with CLES this month," Slevin said. 

 

Results from the study were published in the current issue of the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease. The article is available at http://iospress.metapress.com/content/04427r3701341251/fulltext.pdf.

 

 

Difficulty Swallowing? It Might Be Dysphagia

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 11:46

LEXINGTON, Ky (March 9, 2015) -- Almost everyone has at one time experienced the sensation of something stuck in his or her throat -- after swallowing a pill, perhaps, or choking on food. But recurrent swallowing difficulties could mean a diagnosis of dysphagia -- which can be serious, but is also treatable.

 

A typical swallow process is complex, using the senses of sight, smell and taste (which produce saliva to facilitate chewing), the tongue (pushes the food to the back of the mouth), the pharynx (prompts the action that pushes food to the esophagus), and the voice box/larynx (closes to prevent food from going down the windpipe into the lungs). Dysphagia can be caused by difficulty anywhere in this process, and increases the risk of food aspiration and aspiration pneumonia, dehydration and/or malnutrition.

 

Dysphagia may occur after a stroke, throat and mouth cancer, or as a symptom of several different neurological disorders or autoimmune diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Multiple Sclerosis, ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease), or Scleroderma. Although the medical term is technically considered a symptom of another disease, dysphagia can be a condition in its own right. 

 

Look for the following symptoms as a sign that you might have dysphagia, and see an otolaryngologist (also known as an ear, nose and throat doctor) if you experience:

 

·      Choking when eating and/or regurgitation of food

·      Coughing or gagging when swallowing

·      Sensation of food getting stuck in the throat or chest, or behind the breastbone

·      Food or stomach acid backing up into the throat or recurrent heartburn

·      Hoarseness

·      Pain while swallowing

·      Unexplained weight loss

·      Recurrent pneumonia

 

While many kinds of doctors can diagnose and treat dysphagia, look for speech-language pathologists with specialty certification in swallowing. They will ask about your symptoms, how long they have been present, whether the problem is with liquids, solids or both.  You will be weighed, and asked whether the present weight is about right. A speech-language pathologist can administer swallow tests and other specialized studies to pinpoint the cause of the dysphagia.


Dysphagia and other voice and airway disorders including hoarseness, shortness of breath, and speech disorders can be improved though work with a speech and language pathologist. The patient will learn new ways of swallowing properly and may be given exercises to improve the response of swallow muscles.

 

A nutritionist will help you find foods and liquids (or combinations of them) that are easier to swallow without sacrificing a well-balanced diet.  And, if you are at risk of malnutrition or dehydration, you might need a nasal tube (nasogastric tube) or PEG (percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy) for feeding.

 

While it's easy to dismiss the occasional choking, gagging, or sensation of food stuck in the throat as "no big deal," it can be a dangerous situation.  Reviewing your symptoms with an otolaryngologist and a speech-language pathologist with specialty training in swallowing are the best first steps to identify and alleviate dysphagia.

 

 

Debra M. Suiter, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BCS-S is director, University of Kentucky Voice & Swallow Clinic

 

This column appeared in the March 8, 2015 edition of the Lexington Herald-Leader.

UK Big Blue Family VIDEO: Elodie and Samy-Claude Elayi Hope to Impact Their Adopted Home

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 09:59

 

 

Video Produced by UK Public Relations & Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2015) — A trip to the school library in Paris, France set the foundation for a love story that spans nearly 30 years and two continents.

 

Elodie Elayi, and her husband, Samy-Claude Elayi were born, raised and educated in France.  

 

Today Elodie serves as the research development director at the Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) and coordinator of the CCTS Pilot Funding Program.  She works to help researchers across campus complete translational research, often called the “bench to bedside” process. 

 

Samy-Claude is an associate professor of medicine and a cardiologist specializing in   electrophysiology at the Gill Heart Institute.  He cares for patients who face electrical issues with their hearts. 

 

The Elayi’s now feel that Kentucky is “home” as they raise their two daughters in Lexington.  Watch the video above to hear how they fell in love, had children and moved across the Atlantic twice before settling in the Bluegrass in hopes of making an impact on the health of their fellow Kentuckians.   

 

This video feature is part of a special series produced by UKNow focusing on families who help make up the University of Kentucky community.  There are many couples, brothers and sisters, mothers and sons and fathers and daughters who serve at UK in various fields.   The idea is to show how UK is part of so many families’ lives and how so many families are focused on helping the university succeed each and everyday. 

  

Since the "Big Blue Family" series is now a monthly feature on UKNow, we invite you to submit future ideas.  If you know of a family who you think should be featured, please email us.  Who knows?  We might just choose your suggestion for our next feature!

 

 

 

VIDEO CONTACTS:  Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu

UK College of Law Tax Clinic Prepares Tax Returns for Free

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 09:33

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2015) — Tax season, dubbed a “necessary evil” by some, has arrived and may be causing more confusion than usual this year with changes in the tax code, such as those relating to the Affordable Care Act. Easing taxpayers’ concerns, however, is the University of Kentucky College of Law Tax Clinic, which can save individuals time, money and headaches. The clinic, a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program, will be open through April 15, excluding Spring Break (March 16-20). 

 

A free tax preparation clinic for the UK and Lexington communities, the clinic will file taxes for individuals or assist anyone with questions when filing their own. The tax clinic can assist those whose income comes from: wages, scholarships, interest, dividends, simple self-employment, simple pensions, unemployment insurance, social security or small miscellaneous items. Although the clinic does not have a specific income limit set for those it serves, it is limited to simple returns and assists mostly low income individuals.

 

In addition to providing a valuable community service free of charge, the clinic is a rewarding learning experience for UK College of Law and Gatton College of Business and Economics students. Each year, students volunteer their time to file hundreds of tax returns. All student volunteers complete a series of in-class or online trainings, and afterward, pass multiple Internal Revenue Service (IRS) tests to receive certification.

 

"The VITA program makes a strong impact not only in the Lexington community, but also on College of Law and Gatton College of Business students who participate in the program,” said College of Law Dean David A. Brennen. “Each year hundreds of low income individuals benefit from the free tax preparation services our students provide, but our students also receive hands on, practical experience working one-on-one with clients.”

 

In 2014, 46 volunteers prepared and filed 587 tax returns, saving clients an estimated $114,465 in preparation fees, and resulting in $579,000 in federal refunds and $110,000 in state refunds.

 

“To say the program is mutually beneficial is an understatement. Our students walk away fulfilled, knowing they have helped people through a sometimes confusing process while saving them the cost of preparation fees — money that can then be used to meet their household needs,” Brennen said.

 

The UK College of Law VITA site is one of 19 in Central Kentucky operating with the help of the United Way of the Bluegrass. College of Law Associate Dean of Academic Affairs Douglas Michael leads the clinic with the help of Jennifer Bird-Pollan, James and Mary Lassiter Associate Professor of Law.

 

“I am particularly impressed by the dozens of law and accounting students who each year volunteer to spend the equivalent of two or three working days training and testing in order to qualify to prepare returns, and then six weeks in clinic helping taxpayers save money and comply with the law — all for the sole satisfaction of a job well done, and only to assist those less fortunate or who do not and do not want to understand taxes.

 

"The students also take away valuable experience in developing their law and accounting skills, and I hope they take away a good sense of the value of community service. And they receive taxpayer smiles, hugs, and kind words which are truly invaluable. It is a chance to be someone’s hero," said Michael.

 

The tax clinic is located in the basement of the College of Law, Room 47, at 620 South Limestone. To schedule an appointment, visit https://booknow.appointment-plus.com/6eq1rr9c/.

 

Individuals planning to take advantage of the clinic must bring:

·         Photo ID

·         Social Security Card or ITIN for taxpayer, spouse and dependents

·         All forms you have received, including W-2, 1099, 1098, or 1042-S

·         Documentation of other income

·         Copy of last year's return, if available

 

For more information about the UK College of Law Tax Clinic, visit www.law.uky.edu/tax.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

New UK Research Facility Gets Green Light From State Legislature

Tue, 03/03/2015 - 23:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 4, 2015) — University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto believes it is time "to make death a beggar in Kentucky.”

 

It’s the idea that through world-class research across an array of disciplines, and a commitment to working as partners with communities across the state, some of the most stubborn health challenges and statistics that plague Kentucky can be successfully attacked.

 

On Tuesday, the state General Assembly and Gov. Steve Beshear demonstrated their unwavering commitment to that vision of addressing Kentucky’s most stubborn health disparities by endorsing funding for construction of a $265 million, multidisciplinary research building at UK. 

 

The Senate voted 36-1 Tuesday in support of funding  $132.5 million of the cost of constructing the $265 million facility. UK will fund the other half through research contracts and private fundraising. Earlier this month, the House also strongly endorsed the proposal, which has also had Beshear’s strong support throughout the legislative process.

 

"Kentuckians have suffered from poor health and early deaths for decades, and sadly, many of these diseases are preventable or manageable with proper health care.  Combating these entrenched health problems requires big changes and big investments,” Beshear said of the research facility. "I’m heartened by the legislature’s support of a major investment in UK’s planned medical research facility, which will focus its work on reducing Kentucky's unacceptably high rates of preventable diseases and deaths.  The facility will complement the lifesaving efforts at Markey Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute. Finally, this medical research facility will attract world-class researchers to target rapid improvements in Kentucky's collective health.  These are worthy goals with statewide benefits.”

 

Support for — and momentum behind — the facility grew in January when Senate President Robert Stivers endorsed the proposal.

 

“I believe that this facility will kind of be at the forefront of making a healthier population, a more educated population and a population, which will be able to go into the workforce,” Stivers said.

 

Capilouto said the overwhelming support from Gov. Beshear and legislators also underscored the faith state policymakers have in the university to transform the Commonwealth for the better. 

 

"This is a clear and resounding endorsement of this institution and of our faculty and staff,” Capilouto said. "This facility — envisioned by our Board of Trustees at their October 2014 Retreat — will bring together researchers and others across our campus, from a host of disciplines, working side-by-side on the issues that most challenge our state. In particular, we will focus together on dangerously stubborn health disparities — the hundreds of preventable deaths that occur each year from diseases such as stroke, diabetes and cancer. Gov. Beshear and our legislators, through their vision and far-sightedness, have decided that an investment today in UK and its world-class faculty and staff will pay off for our state for generations to come."

 

View more of Capilouto's comments about today's historic vote and what it means for UK and the Commonwealth:http://youtu.be/AtYnP3t4iw4.

 

The building, which would be located near UK's bio-pharm and biological biomedical research buildings, would put together researchers across disciplines, working in teams, to address some of the state’s most intractable issues. If approved by Gov. Beshear, UK will work to begin construction by the end of the year.

 

The health challenges the facility and researchers will address include the hundreds of deaths that occur in Kentucky each year due to cancer, heart and pulmonary disease, stroke and other preventable illnesses.

 

Those health maladies are particularly acute in Eastern Kentucky, which is served by UK HealthCare through a number of partnerships with local and regional hospitals and health providers. Capilouto has said that targeted combination of leading research and outstanding clinical care, in partnership with communities, can lead to better health outcomes.

  

During earlier testimony before a key House committee, Capilouto and UK Interim Vice President for Research Lisa Cassis told lawmakers that UK has some 330 individual research projects — totaling some $350 million — currently investigating those challenges and others. 

 

Moreover, the economic impact of research is significant as well, Capilouto said, pointing to a recent UK study that concluded that the annual direct and indirect economic impact of UK’s sponsored research across the campus was $581 million in fiscal year 2013, with more than 8,000 jobs created and $21.3 million generated annually in local and state taxes.

 

A link to a presentation about the proposed facility can be viewed here: 

http://uknow.uky.edu/sites/default/files/house_ar_v2_2-10-15_0.pptx.

 

Apply Now to Become a UK STAR

Tue, 03/03/2015 - 17:21

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 4, 2015) — You, too, can be a STAR, a star student, star leader, star innovator.

 

The deadline is March 9 for undergraduates to apply to STAR, the University of Kentucky’s Summer Training in Alcohol Research program. Students can study alcohol‐related disorders like alcoholism, fetal alcohol syndrome, cancer, family relationship dynamics, medications development and risk factors.

 

An innovative grant from the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) funds the UK program that both advances research of alcohol abuse, but also trains tomorrow's problem solvers.

 

UK launched STAR last year thanks to the $350,000 NIAAA grant that pays the chosen students a $4,000 stipend during a 10-week summer internship in one of 11 UK psychology, physiology and pharmacology labs, working on research projects that focus on alcohol and its effects.

 

The program reaches out specifically to a diverse population of Kentuckians for this unique educational opportunity. The chosen students will work in some of UK’s best laboratory environments to unlock the answers to serious problems, while engaging with top-notch faculty mentors.

 

“Due to the breadth and depth of our faculty’s research, a broad range of opportunities exist for our undergraduate students," said UK President Eli Capilouto when the program was launched last year. "They will be engaged across the spectrum of creative inquiry, from cell biology to alcohol’s impact on interpersonal behavior. We hope this talented, diverse group of undergraduates will deepen their interest in STEM fields and research, particularly the biomedical and behavioral sciences.” 

 

“During the first year of the UK STAR training program, we received 126 applications from every corner of the continental U.S.A. and from Puerto Rico," said co-PI University Research Professor Mark A. Prendergast. "We were able to recruit a diverse group of 11 highly ambitious and productive undergraduate students who had already demonstrated a commitment to careers in the STEM fields,” said Prendergast, a UK psychology professor who supervises the Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center, one of the STAR labs.

 

Last year’s trainees received 10 weeks of intensive laboratory-based research on many aspects of alcohol and drug abuse. In addition, they received training in the responsible conduct of research, including ethics in data analysis and the care of research subjects.  The culminating experience of the training was a daylong UK STAR alcohol research symposium on campus, at which, each trainee gave a scientific presentation to members of the UK substance abuse research community.

 

“Our post-training survey research clearly indicated that the UK STAR experience solidified the commitment of these exceptional trainees to the pursuit of careers in the STEM fields, including in academic programs here at UK,” said Prendergast.  “We are thrilled to be able to offer this opportunity to many more talented students.”

 

For more information about UK STAR and to submit an application, visit  http://www.as.uky.edu/uk-star.

 

New Sustainable and Recyclable Consumer Products Brand Wins UK Venture Challenge

Tue, 03/03/2015 - 17:01

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 4, 2015) University of Kentucky architecture graduate student Mark Manczyk won the UK Venture Challenge and a $1,500 scholarship with his business idea, "re.3." Second place and $1,000 went to Phillip Gordon with "Nomad Apparel." The "FinanceU" team of Michael Lewis and TJ Barnett won third place and $500. UK Venture Challenge was held last Saturday, Feb. 28, at the William T. Young Library UKAA Auditorium.

 

“Congratulations to all of the students who participated in UK Venture Challenge,” said University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto. “This competition provides students the opportunity to be creative, innovative and entrepreneurial, which is an important part of their educational experience.”

 

Mark Manczyk, a first-year graduate student in the Masters of Architecture program, said “'re.3' will produce sustainable consumer accessories with an end of use program that incentivizes customers to recycle old products. I plan to continue iterating on further designs and product ideas for 're.3' via 3d printing. These will be helpful in showing more of a product suite for 're.3' since the business model is less about one single product, but rather about the dynamic of the recycling and reuse of the sustainable materials from previous products.”

 

Manczyk said that Venture Challenge was important in expanding his belief and confidence in the business concept for "re.3."

 

"Having the opportunity to receive comments from the judges and others there on Saturday is extremely valuable in helping me to evolve the business and have more potential for success,” he said.

 

Marketing senior Phillip Gordon’s concept for "Nomad Apparel" is to produce comfortable and stylish clothes, starting with jeans, with a secure pocket.

 

“I plan to use the prize money to order new pants and shorts to prepare for a full production run and to develop new product lines I am designing,” said Gordon, who not only won second place, but was also the online vote winner with 5,542 votes.

 

“Venture Challenge gave me the opportunity to practice my presentation skills and show off all my hard work over the past months," Gordan said. "I was glad to meet so many like-minded students in their entrepreneurial pursuits and hope this competition continues to grow at UK.”

 

Third place winners Michael Lewis and TJ Barnett described FinanceU as a free, innovative, community-based platform that empowers any student to build their own scholarship through the process of crowdfunding.

 

“Our team is working hard to develop FinanceU. The money we won will be used to help bring FinanceU to market this fall,” said Lewis, a finance and accounting freshman, who added, “Visit www.financeu.org to get started and learn more!”

 

Partner Barnett is also a freshman in finance and management.

 

“Competing in Venture Challenge was a great experience that allowed us to network with some awesome entrepreneurs and get great feedback on our company,” Lewis said. “We were honored to compete against so many great ideas.”  

 

The first and second place UK Venture Challenge winners will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U, regionals sponsored by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development.

 

The UK Venture Challenge competition is organized by iNET Director Deb Weis with Dean Harvey, the executive director of the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship. iNET, the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, is hosted by the College of Communication and Information. The Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship & the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network are part of the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Sarah Geegan, (859) 257-5365; sarah.geegan@uky.edu

Get Healthy, Win Prizes With UKColorMyPlate

Tue, 03/03/2015 - 16:52
LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 4, 2015) UK Dining is challenging the UK community to eat more fruits and vegetables, through the UKColorMyPlate campaign.

 

UKColorMyPlate is a contest that encourages individuals to consume a variety of fruits and vegetables. U.S. Department of Agriculture MyPlate guidelines suggest that individuals make half of their plate consist of fruits and vegetables, and the more color, the better.

 

The 4-week contest involves a "rainbow" of colors, with each week focusing on different fruits and vegetables.

 

To participate in the contest, UK students, faculty and staff should upload pictures of their plates featuring fruits or vegetables that match the designated color of the week with the hashtag #ukcolormyplate.

  • Week 1, (March 1-7): Red. Examples include apples, grapes, strawberries, raspberries, beets, radishes, red peppers and tomatoes.
  • Week 2, (March 8-14): Green. Examples include lettuce, asparagus, beans, broccoli, okra, peas, zucchini, cabbage and brussels sprouts.
  • Week 3, (March 15-21): Orange and Yellow. Examples include cantaloupe, peaches, carrots, corn, peppers, squash and sweet potatoes.
  • Week 4, (March 22-28): Purple and Blue. Examples include blackberries, blueberries, eggplant, purple cabbage, beets and plums.

The participant who uploads the most photos of different plates each week will win a prize. The participant who uploads the most pictures of different plates during the entire contest will win the grand prize.

 

Make sure to tag UK Dining on any of the following social media platforms.

  • Facebook: ukydining
  • Twitter: @ukydining
  • Instagram: ukydining

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Sarah Geegan, (859) 257-5365; sarah.geegan@uky.edu

 

Meal Plans Provide Quality, Affordable Options for UK Faculty and Staff

Tue, 03/03/2015 - 14:56

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 4, 2015) UK Dining offers faculty and staff the opportunity to save money through a variety of meal options and access to all of the restaurants and convenience stores on campus.

 

The three plans include:

  • The 20 Block Plan, which includes 20 all-you-care-to-eat meals at Blazer Café and Commons Market for $110, at approximately $5.50 per meal. Any extra meals roll over to the next semester and do not expire. This plan offers the most amount of food for the money.
  • The 10 Block Plan, which includes 10 all-you-care-to-eat meals at Blazer Café and Commons Market for $110 (approximately $6 per meal) and $50 flex. The meals and flex dollars for faculty/staff do not expire and will roll over.
  • The All Flex Dollars Plan, which includes $200 flex for $170. Flex can be used at all campus cafés, restaurants and convenience stores.

Meals on the 20- and 10- block plans may also be used for Wildcat Deals at select restaurants. At select restaurants, faculty and staff can also receive an additional $1 off food purchases of $5 or more with a faculty/staff ID (excludes combos, national brands and convenience stores).       

 

UK Dining is committed to providing the UK community a broad selection of great tasting, healthy food and beverages. Menus are created by experienced chefs who have a passion for food. Kentucky Proud products are also used throughout campus to provide wholesome, locally grown food.

 

Visit the UK Dining website to learn more about faculty and staff meal plans.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Sarah Geegan, (859) 257-5365; sarah.geegan@uky.edu

How Did Japan Survive One of the World's Worst Natural Disasters

Tue, 03/03/2015 - 14:32

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 6, 2015) — The University of Kentucky Japan Studies Program presents the documentary 『ほんとうの歌』 ("True Songs") March 11. The event coincides with the fourth anniversary of the 2011 earthquake/tsunami/nuclear power plant meltdown in Northern Japan.

 

The documentary will be screened with free admission at 7-9 p.m. Wednesday at the Kentucky Theatre on Main Street, downtown Lexington. 

 

“True Songs” follows the performances of a dramatic reading of the late Kenji Miyazawa’s “Milky Way Railroad” by several of Japan’s outstanding artists. These include the novelist Furukawa Hideo, who wrote the screenplay; the poet Suga Keijirō, the musician Kojima Keitaney-Love and the translator Shibata Motoyuki. It is a record of song, oral narrative and spoken word performances performed in the years since the March 11, 2011, disaster. The group has taken the show throughout Japan — from an ancient sake distillery to evacuation housing in Northern Japan to a railroad car in Kyoto. The film provides not only a documentary of the performance’s history, but a record of the performance itself and a record of life in post-3.11 Japan.

 

Keijiro, one of the principal actors/readers/artists, will lead a discussion following the film. He is a renowned Japanese poet, writer and translator; the recipient of a range of major literary awards and a professor at Tokyo’s Meiji University. He is the author of more than a dozen books including “Strangeography” (2013), “Agend'Ars” (2010) and “Omniphone” (2005). He has also translated many works from French, Spanish and English, including Antoine de Saint-Exupery's “The Little Prince.”

 

Professor Doug Slaymaker, of UK’s Japan Studies program, supplied the subtitles and described the film as “a compelling rendition of a powerful stage piece performed by some of contemporary Japan’s most important voices. It is also a remix of one of the most loved of Japanese tales — Miyazawa’s ‘Milky Way Railroad.’ Miyazawa and this tale are tied to the Fukushima area.”

 

Fukushima is located in the northeastern area of Japan, which took the brunt of the deadly 9.0 earthquake and tsunami, which reached heights of more than 130 feet and traveled up to six miles inland. The earthquake moved the main island of Japan 8 feet eastward and shifted the Earth on its axis between 4 and 10 inches. The disaster caused meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the worst nuclear meltdown since Chernobyl. Nearly 16,000 were confirmed dead, 6,000 more injured and more than 2,000 still missing.  

 

Miyazawa is from the Fukushima region; so is novelist and playwright Furukawa. “Thus, the film is closely tied to the affected area, even though it is not about the disasters," Slaymaker said.

 

“Miyazawa’s tale of loss and possibility, of the fabulous and the grand, has taken on special meaning following the 3.11 disasters. In this record of the dramatic reading, mostly staged in the disaster-stricken areas, we get an intimate portrayal of the psychological and physical repercussions of the disasters,” said Slaymaker.

 

The event is sponsored by UK’s College of Arts and Sciences Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures; the Japan Program; and the International Studies Program.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, gghair2@uky.edu, 859-257-3302.

Kentucky Legislators OK Funding for New UK Research Facility

Tue, 03/03/2015 - 13:27

 

Video Produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing.  To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click the "thought bubble" icon in the same area.

 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (March 3, 2015) — The Kentucky Senate Tuesday overwhelmingly endorsed funding for a multi-disciplinary research facility at the University of Kentucky that will specifically focus on health disparities confronting the Commonwealth.

 

Under the legislation, which now goes to Gov. Steve Beshear for his signature, the state will fund $132.5 million of the cost of constructing the $265 million facility. UK will fund the other half through research contracts and private fundraising.

 

"Our goal is to make death a beggar in Kentucky," said UK President Eli Capilouto. "Our legislators, through their vision and far-sightedness, have decided that an investment today in UK and its world-class faculty and staff will pay off for our state for generations to come."

 

View more of Capilouto's comments about today's historic vote and what it means for UK and the Commonwealth: http://youtu.be/AtYnP3t4iw4.

 

The building, which would be located near UK's bio-pharm and biological biomedical research buildings, would put together researchers across disciplines, working in teams, to address some of the state’s most intractable issues. If approved by Gov. Beshear, UK will work to begin construction by the end of the year.

 

The health challenges the facility and researchers will address include the hundreds of deaths that occur in Kentucky each year due to cancer, heart and pulmonary disease, stroke and other preventable illnesses.

 

Those health maladies are particularly acute in Eastern Kentucky, which is served by UK HealthCare through a number of partnerships with local and regional hospitals and health providers. Capilouto has said that targeted combination of leading research and outstanding clinical care, in partnership with communities, can lead to better health outcomes.

 

Support for — and momentum behind — the facility grew in January when Senate President Robert Stivers endorsed the proposal.

 

“I believe that this facility will kind of be at the forefront of making a healthier population, a more educated population and a population, which will be able to go into the workforce,” Stivers said.

 

During earlier testimony before a key House committee, Capilouto and UK Interim Vice President for Research Lisa Cassis told lawmakers that UK has some 330 individual research projects — totaling some $350 million — currently investigating those challenges and others. 

 

Moreover, the economic impact of research is significant as well, Capilouto said, pointing to a recent UK study that concluded that the annual direct and indirect economic impact of UK’s sponsored research across the campus was $581 million in fiscal year 2013, with more than 8,000 jobs created and $21.3 million generated annually in local and state taxes.

 

A link to a presentation about the proposed facility can be viewed here: 

http://uknow.uky.edu/sites/default/files/house_ar_v2_2-10-15_0.pptx.

 

Wellness Goes Wild at UK

Tue, 03/03/2015 - 11:48

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 6, 2015) — “Wellness Gone Wild,” sponsored by the University of Kentucky Student Wellness Ambassadors, promotes a safe Spring Break at events scheduled March 9-11.

 

Use hashtag #WellnessGoneWild to share the events. 

 

“The Student Wellness Ambassadors, in collaboration with campus partners, wanted to provide an educational and interactive experience to promote wellness and safety among their peers. They want to use this event as an opportunity to connect with their peers to various campus resources,” said Marie Hartke, prevention coordinator for the Office of Substance Education and Responsibility in the Division of Student Affairs.

 

On Monday, March 9, “Fuel Your Bod” is planned 1-4 p.m. at the Johnson Center lobby. During the event, Student Wellness Ambassadors will provide information about physical health and nutrition.

 

UK Sexperts and members of the Violence Intervention and Prevention Center present “We’re Bringing Sexy Facts” on March 10. They will provide information on sexual health, promote the importance of affirmative consent and suggest ways individuals can ask for and give consent. The event is slated 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, March 10, in the Alumni Gallery (Room 1-65) of William T. Young Library.

 

On March 11, join the Student Wellness Ambassadors for the Game of Life: Spring Break Edition in the Johnson Center lobby from 4-7 p.m. The event is hosted by the Johnson Center, the Violence Intervention and Prevention Center, GeneationRx, Student Health Advisory Council, the Counseling Center and University Health Services. Students will provide their peers with interactive education around various aspects of mental, physical, emotional and financial wellness. There will be free food, games, giveaways and the chance to win prizes.

 

This semester, the Office of Substance Education and Responsibility is changing its name to the Office of Wellness Initiatives for Student Empowerment (WISE), with a revised mission that reflects the development of holistic wellness outreach programs and initiatives for students.

 

The new name reflects the awareness “that student wellness must be addressed from a well-rounded, holistic perspective in order to be truly effective,” said director Andrew Smith.

 

Student Wellness Ambassadors are affiliated with this Student Affairs office. The mission of the Student Wellness Ambassadors is to provide knowledge to their peers about alcohol, drugs and holistic wellness. With this information, it is their goal to empower their peers to make safe and healthy choices in all aspects of their life.

 

For more information or if you are interested in joining the Student Wellness Ambassadors, email marie.hartke@uky.edu.

 

Entrepreneurship, Regulation is Focus of March 10 Forum

Mon, 03/02/2015 - 16:52

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 4, 2015) — The Moot Court Room in the University of Kentucky's College of Law building will host a public forum examining entrepreneurship and economic regulation at 4 p.m. Tuesday, March 10. The program is being hosted by the Gatton College of Business and Economics' Program for the Study of Capitalism and the Economy, which is supported by the BB&T Corporation, and the UK College of Law Federalist Society.

 

The forum, which is free and open to the public, will discuss the case of Wildcat Moving, LLC in regard to economic regulation and issues surrounding the 14th Amendment.

 

John Garen, BB&T Professor of Economics in the Gatton College, will serve as program moderator. He will be joined by three panelists:

·         Raleigh Bruner, managing partner, Wildcat Moving LLC

·         Brian Frye, assistant professor, UK College of Law

·         Frank Scott, Gatton Endowed Professor of Economics

 

The program is scheduled to last one hour. Parking is available at UK's Parking Garage # 5, near the corner of S. Limestone and Euclid.

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200/ carl.nathe@uky.edu;

Coach Matthew Mitchell to Headline Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Dinner

Mon, 03/02/2015 - 15:37

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 3, 2015) -- University of Kentucky women's basketball coach Matthew Mitchell will headline the University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Foundation Dinner celebrating great minds on April 23. The event, presented and sponsored by Alltech, will be held at the Lexington Center in downtown Lexington, with more than 700 people expected to attend.  

 

Each year, the dinner hosts a guest speaker who is either an example of successful aging or who has a personal connection to Alzheimer’s and age-related diseases. Previous guest speakers have included such well-known figures as Captain Chesley B. "Sully" Sullenberger, Barbara Bush, Colin Powell, John Glenn, Bob Dole, Willard Scott, Lauren Bacall, Andy Rooney, Hugh Downs, Newt Gingrich, Ed McMahon, Dr. Pearse Lyons and James W. Host.

 

Coach, athlete and inspirational speaker, Coach Mitchell watched as his mentor, friend, and legendary University of Tennesssee women’s basketball coach Pat Summit was diagnosed with early onset dementia, Alzheimer's type at the age of 59. To honor her, the Mitchell Family Foundation joined the fight against Alzheimer’s by donating $50,000 in the last two years.

 

The dinner will fund internationally recognized ongoing research at the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, where researchers are engaged in the battle against Alzheimer's disease and other age-related illnesses. Individual tickets to the dinner are $175 ($200 at the door), with proceeds benefiting SBCoA. Corporate and individual table sponsorships are available starting at $1,500. For more information or to purchase tickets, go to:  http://www.uky.edu/coa, or contact the SBCoA Foundation at (859) 323-5374 or lisa.greer@uky.edu.  

 

About the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging:

The UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging has been conducting research on Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and other aging-related concerns for more than 30 years. Through a gift from the Eleanor and John Y. Brown Jr. Foundation and a matching grant from the Commonwealth of Kentucky, the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging opened in 1979 and is one of 10 original National Institutes of Health-funded Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers. Today, the center is an internationally prestigious research center.

 

About the Foundation

The Board of Directors are committed to supporting the efforts to slow down and eventually find a cure for the diseases of the elderly. Foundation board members from around Kentucky personally support the center and serve as its ambassadors, cultivating relationships and partnerships to benefit the center’s important work.  In its lifetime, this organization has made considerable progress in obtaining support from corporations, foundation and individuals to support endowments, research and efforts to improve the health of elderly in Kentucky, through raising funds, increasing awareness and building external relationships at local, state and national levels.

Today Last Day to Vote in SGA Elections

Mon, 03/02/2015 - 15:01

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 5, 2015) — Voting in Student Government elections will end today.

 

Students may vote online at www.uksga.org until Thursday at 6 p.m. or you may cast your vote at polling locations. The polling locations include the Classroom Building, open 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.


Elections are for president and vice president, college senators and senators-at-large.

 

Read letter below from SGA to students Wednesday with inclement weather information:

Calling all Wildcats!

Student Government elections begin today, Wednesday, March 4, and end on Thursday, March 5.

 

Students may vote online at www.uksga.org beginning Wednesday at 9 a.m. until Thursday at 6 p.m. or you may cast your vote at polling locations. The polling locations include White Hall Classroom Building, open 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. on both days of the election, and in the William T. Young Library, open from 6 – 9 p.m. (Rose Street entrance) on Wednesday.

 

In the event of inclement weather, polling locations on campus may close, however online voting will be available. The latest weather information will be available on at www.uky.edu/alerts or on UKNow at uknow.uky.edu.


Elections for president and vice president, college senators and senators-at-large will be held at this time, so be sure to go out and make your voice heard!

Go Cats!

UK Student Government

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett, katy.bennett@uky.edu, 859-257-1909 or Blair Hoover, blair.hoover@uky.edu, 859-257-2395

'Tales of Hoffmann' Comes to Stage With Vocal Fireworks

Mon, 03/02/2015 - 14:38

 

 

Promo for "The Tales of Hoffmann." Video courtesy of UK Opera Theatre. 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 3, 2015) — If you adore sword fights, sopranos with high, high notes, mezzos in pants, sexy courtesans, evil villains and great death scenes (there are several)…you must see University of Kentucky Opera Theatre’s "The Tales of Hoffmann" running March 5-8, at the Lexington Opera House.

 

Paris was the place to be between 1852 and 1870. Plays and operettas mixed lavish settings and sensual themes with political and social satire. Wealthy men from high society were often seen at opening nights with actresses, young dancers and elegant courtesans on their arms.

 

Jacques Offenbach embodied the spirit of this era, in his opera, "The Tales of Hoffmann." This opera (sung in French with English supertitles) is based on the stories by the German romantic E.T.A. Hoffmann, who appears as the main character. He pursues three doomed loves while his muse, disguised as an old friend, tries to persuade him to devote himself to his art. Each act has a villain to hiss at and beautiful arias to enjoy. Some of the music will be so familiar that you may leave the Opera House humming. Hoffmann dons a pair of magical glasses which turns his reality into something dreamlike.

 

Gabrielle Barker, UK senior, gives a reading and then a performance of the "Doll Aria" from "The Tales of Hoffmann." Video courtesy of UK Opera Theatre.

 

Hoffmann is sung by tenors, Gregory Turay, alumnus and artist-in-residence, and Jonathan Parham, a graduate student studying with Everett McCorvey, director of UK Opera Theatre. All the principal roles are double cast with UK Opera Theatre’s award-winning singers, including Wanessa Campelo and Holly Nicole Dodson as Nicklausse/The Muse; Gabrielle Barker and Mary Catherine Wright as Olympia; Whitney Myers and Brittany Jones as Giulietta; and Ashley Jackson and Dianna Vetter as Antonia. The casts perform on alternate days, March 5 – 8.

 

Andrew Miller, UK senior, gives a reading and then a performance of  "Jour et nuit" from "The Tales of Hoffmann." Video courtesy of UK Opera Theatre. 

 

Members of the UK Symphony Orchestra bring the beautiful melodies of this opera to life, under the baton of Maestro John Nardolillo. UK Opera Theatre is honored to have as guest director, David Lefkowich, who has worked in major opera houses around the world. Lefkowich and Turay last worked together in the premiere of Julie Taymor’s "The Magic Flute" at the Metropolitan Opera. They are delighted to work together again in this production in Lexington.

 

"The Tales of Hoffmann" will take the stage 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, March 5-7, and 2 p.m. Sunday, March 8. Tickets range from $38.40 to $54.75 based on location of seating. To purchase tickets, contact the Lexington Center box office – in person, by calling 859-233-3535 or visiting www.ticketmaster.com. Student ticket rates are available in person at Lexington Center box office only with a valid student ID.

 

UK Opera Theatre is one of a select group of U.S. opera training programs recommended by the Richard Tucker Music Foundation. The Tucker Foundation is a nonprofit cultural organization dedicated to the support and advancement of the careers of talented American opera singers by bringing opera into the community and heightening appreciation for opera by supporting music education enrichment programs.

 

The UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

Celebrate Diversity at Second Annual OUTspoken Event

Mon, 03/02/2015 - 12:10

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 3, 2015) — The second annual OUTspoken event will take place from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 4, in Memorial Hall on UK's campus and will consist of two parts. The event is an equal collaboration between OUTsource: the LGBTQ* Resource Center, Shades of Pride, Gay-Straight Alliance, the VIP Center and the Student Activities Board.

 

J Mase III, a black transgender poet from New York City, was invited and is attending the event as the keynote speaker and performing artist. He is the creator of the national performance event, "Cupid Ain’t @#$%!: An Anti-Valentine’s Day Poetry Movement." More information about him can be found at www.campuspride.org/speakers/jmase.

 

From 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., there will be a writing workshop led by J Mase III. Beginning at 7:45 p.m., the second portion of the event will begin as the UK LGBTQ+Ally family will have the opportunity to share their own stories as survivors of interpersonal violence. They will discuss personal experiences and how they were able to demonstrate resiliency and strength. J Mase III will present his spoken word poetry between survivors’ stories.

 

The event is open to the entire campus community and free food will be provided.

 

“SAB is excited to be working with OUTsource and several other campus partners to bring OUTspoken to campus for a second year,"  Brenton Smith, director of Pop Culture Committee, said. “This event will be a place for safe expression and will feature the wonderful spoken word of J Mase III."

 

OUTsource exists to provide an affirming, safe and celebrating space for LGBTQQIPA+Ally family to learn more about gender identity, human sexuality and related issues by providing access to academic, cultural, campus and interpersonal resources; and to change the campus climate and culture to become more inclusive of LGBTQQIPA+Ally family by embracing, fostering and enabling diversity.

 

Shades of Pride exists to promote for retention, success and advocacy for students, staff and faculty at UK who identify as a person of color and part of the LGBTQ* community, as well as allies and supporters by providing a safe space and programing.

 

The purpose of UK Gay-Straight Alliance is to provide students at UK the opportunity for mutual support and discussion of issues relating to sexuality and gender identity, emphasizing respect and reasonable discretion. UK GSA will provide a safe social atmosphere and external outreach that fosters understanding and cooperation. Additionally, UK GSA will seek opportunities for community service and non-partisan activism related to fairness issues.

 

SAB brings more than 100 entertaining, educational and enriching programs that are reflective of contemporary issues and trends to the University of Kentucky annually. These programs are designed to enhance the college experience for students, faculty, staff and the greater Lexington community.

 

Connect with SAB at www.uksab.org, follow them on Twitter at twitter.com/UKSAB or Instagram at instagram.com/uksab or like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/UKSAB. For more information about SAB and events, email contact@uksab.org or text a question beginning with SABQ, followed by your question or comment, to 411-247.

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett, katy.bennett@uky.edu, 859-257-1909

SAB CONTACT: Olivia Senter, publicrelations@uksab.org, 859-257-8868

 

 

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