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Kathi Kern Added to OAH Distinguished Lectureship Program Roster

Thu, 04/21/2016 - 12:09

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 25, 2016) — University of Kentucky Associate Professor of History Kathi Kern has been appointed one of the 78 new speakers to the Organization of American Historians’ prestigious Distinguished Lectureship Program for 2016-17.

 

These scholars, who are affiliated with some of the nation’s top universities, join more than 400 other OAH Distinguished Lecturers who speak to audiences across the country each year and are widely sought for appearances at museums, libraries, universities, community centers, churches and synagogues, and other venues. OAH Distinguished Lecturers strive to promote understanding and appreciation of all facets of U.S. history from the 1600s through the present, which is an essential component of the organization’s mission.

 

Kern also directs UK’s Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching (CELT) and holds an endowed professorship at the Chellgren Center in the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence. She is the author of many articles and book chapters as well as “Mrs. Stanton's Bible” (2001), selected as a Choice Outstanding Academic Book. Kern has won the Provost’s Outstanding Teaching Award, the UK Alumni Association’s Great Teacher Award, and the UK College of Education's Teachers Who Made a Difference Award.

 

To hear a UK at the Half radio interview with Kathi Kern, visit http://uknow.uky.edu/sites/default/files/ukath-2015-16-13_mixdown_0.mp3

 

Kern’s research focuses on the women's rights movement in 19th century America, particularly on the ways religion, gender and politics have mixed to create new ideological positions and social change. She has been actively engaged in research, authoring successful grants funded through the U.S. Department of Education Teaching American History grant program with awards totaling nearly $4 million. Much of her time is spent in outreach to public school teachers, teaching summer institutes in the Mississippi Delta, in Alaska and at the Smithsonian Institution.

 

In her role as director of CELT, Kern has worked extensively in international faculty development, training university faculty in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan and China. In 2009-2010, Kern was the Stanley Kelley Jr. Visiting Associate Professor for Distinguished Teaching in the religion department and the program in women and gender at Princeton University.

 

Katherine M. Finley, the OAH's executive director, said, “We thank these historians for their service to the organization and for helping advance our mission. And we congratulate them on achieving this high honor.”

 

Founded in 1907, the Organization of American Historians (OAH) is the world's largest professional association dedicated to American history scholarship. With more than 7,800 members from the U.S. and abroad, OAH promotes excellence in the scholarship, teaching and presentation of American history, encouraging wide discussion of historical questions and equitable treatment of history practitioners. It publishes the quarterly Journal of American History, the leading scholarly publication and journal of record in the field of American history for more than nine decades. It also publishes The American Historian magazine. Formerly known as the Mississippi Valley Historical Association (MVHA), the association became the OAH in 1965 to reflect a broader scope focusing on national studies of American history. The OAH national headquarters are located in the historic Raintree House on Indiana University's Bloomington campus. The house is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

UK MANRRS Chapter Again Wins National Honors

Thu, 04/21/2016 - 12:07

LEXINGTON, Ky., (April 22, 2016) — For the fourth consecutive year, the University of Kentucky MANRRS chapter was named National Chapter of the Year at the recent 31st annual conference for Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS). The chapter, housed in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, also brought home honors for students and 4-H agents.

 

Quentin Tyler, assistant dean and director of the college’s Office of Diversity, heaped praise on the students and advisers of the chapter. Tyler is completing his term as national MANRRS professional president May 1 and will move into the role of immediate past president, a three-year term.

 

“I am very proud of the strength, courage and vision of this year’s group. From the beginning of the year, they had a collective goal of winning the National Chapter of the Year for the fourth consecutive time,” he said. “Not only did they perform well in the classroom, they also excelled in the areas of community and campus involvement, leadership and buying into what MANRRS represents.”

 

Tyler said businesses, government organizations and other colleges and universities took notice of the exceptional students that make up the UK MANRRS chapter.

 

“Despite our membership consisting of more than 40 percent freshmen, it is evident that we as a college have a strong foundation and support from our leadership that turns the dreams of our students into reality,” Tyler said. “I have been fortunate to not only serve as president of an amazing organization but to see the growth of the UK MANRRS chapter. Four years of being recognized as the best chapter of 75 across 38 states is an amazing accomplishment.”

 

Tyler and co-advisers Antomia Farrell and Natasha Saunders took more than 70 delegates to Jacksonville, Florida, for the conference. The students’ written report and oral presentation to the national gathering described the chapter’s membership, leadership development, community service and activities, and contained ideas for promoting the national society.

 

In addition to the overall chapter recognition, UK MANRRS brought home a number of individual honors. ReDell Atkinson, a senior merchandising, apparel and textile design major, placed first in the Impromptu Public Speaking Contest. Brittany Love, a junior majoring in kinesiology, placed second in the Written Essay Contest. UK MANRRS was runner up in the National MANRRS Quiz Bowl. Seven of the 20 Farm Credit MANRRS VIP Scholars were UK students: Xavia Gantz, Tiffany Harper, Fabian Leon, Carley Fort, Destiny Butler, Brian Bryson and Gloria Maldonado.

 

Other honors included:

Ashley Shanee, Jefferson County extension 4-H agent and graduate student, is now serving as the National MANRRS graduate student president.

 

Marcus Tyler, a sophomore majoring in agricultural economics, was elected to serve as the national MANRRS undergraduate president.

 

Kelly Moore, a senior majoring in community and leadership development, will be the new national MANRRS undergraduate past president. She is the 2015-2016 national MANRRS undergraduate president and earned the Eunice Foster Award, a distinguished award for her hard work and dedication to the national MANRRS organization.

 

Marcus Bernard, a doctoral student in community and leadership development, is now serving as national MANRRS graduate parliamentarian.

 

Tiffany Harper, a graduate student in community and leadership development, is now serving as national MANRRS region I and V graduate vice president.

 

Xavia Gantz, a graduate student in hospitality and tourism management, is now serving as national MANRRS region III graduate vice president.

 

Carley Fort, a freshman majoring in community and leadership development, won the Bayer Elevator Speech Contest and earned a summer internship with Bayer Crop Science.

 

And, at the annual awards ceremony for the UK MANNRS chapter held on April 20, junior J.D. Harmon, a member of the Wildcat football team, was named as the new MANNRS member of the year for 2015-16.

 

For more information about UK MANRRS and the UK CAFE Office of Diversity, visit http://diversity.ca.uky.edu/.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Aimee Nielson, 859-257-7707.

Fulbright U.S. Student Program Officer to Speak on Opportunities

Thu, 04/21/2016 - 11:19

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 25, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Office of Nationally Competitive Awards will welcome Lora Seery, senior program officer for the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, to campus this week to speak about the highly competitive application process for the prestigious program. Seery will speak to interested applicants from 3:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. Thursday, April 28, in room 101 of the James W. Stuckert Career Center.

 

Space is limited for the session with Seery, so free registration will be required for this event. Those interested in attending should email Jennifer Stevens at jennifer.stevens@uky.edu, to reserve a seat.

 

Open to students in all majors, the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, provides grants for one academic year for individually designed research projects, graduate study or English Teaching Assistant (ETA) Programs. During the grants, Fulbrighters work, live with and learn from the people of the host country. The Fulbright award pays for the cost of travel to and from the host country, as well as providing a stipend to cover housing, meals and other living expenses.

 

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program accepts applications from current undergraduates, graduate students and alumni. Students must be a U.S. citizen on track to complete a bachelor’s degree before the start of the Fulbright year (fall 2017) and may not have earned a doctoral degree. A specific grade-point average is not required, but candidates must show evidence of leadership and public service, a desire to serve as an "unofficial" ambassador for the U.S. and the skills to complete the proposed research or study. Applicants who apply for an English Teaching Assistant award generally do not need teaching experience, but related experience like tutoring can be helpful.

 

Part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education, the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards assists current UK undergraduate and graduate students and recent alumni in applying for external scholarships and fellowships funded by sources (such as a nongovernment foundation or government agency) outside the university. These major awards honor exceptional students across the nation. Students who are interested in these opportunities are encouraged to begin work with Pat Whitlow at the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards well in advance of the scholarship deadline.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Symphony Orchestra Concert Preview on WUKY's 'UK Perspectives'

Thu, 04/21/2016 - 11:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 22, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell. Today's program previews tonight's concert by the UK Symphony Orchestra and UK Choirs featuring Stravinsky’s Violin Concerto in D and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9. Godell's guests are orchestra conductor John Nardolillo, baritone soloist André Campelo, violinist Lucy Becker and bassist Mary Combs.

 

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/uk-symphony-orchestra-takes-stravinsky-beethoven.

 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Power Outage in Barker and Frazee Halls

Thu, 04/21/2016 - 09:52

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2016) — University of Kentucky Physical Plant Division is working to restore power to a small portion of campus after an outage this morning. Power has been interrupted in Barker and Frazee Halls.  A temporary outage also affected a portion of the William T. Young Library this morning, but power has been restored there.

 

According to initial reports, the power outage is connected to construction work on the new Student Center.

 

UK Pharmacy Students Bring Operation Heart to Central and Eastern Kentucky

Thu, 04/21/2016 - 09:50

Lexington, Ky. (April 22, 2016)  Most people think of a pharmacist as someone who counts pills or measures out medicine — more of a behind-the-scenes provider than someone on the front lines of patient care. In reality, a pharmacist can be a patient's first line of defense against health problems such as heart disease.

 

When a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that patients had more success regulating their hypertension when their pharmacist was involved in their care, the American Pharmacists Association - Academy of Student Pharmacists (AphA- ASP) founded Operation Heart so that pharmacy students could facilitate healthy lifestyle behaviors, provide simple health screenings, and educate the public about heart medications.

 

Within a year of the national program's founding, the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy (UKCOP) started their first Operation Heart committee. Since then, UK pharmacy students — under the supervision of pharmacists — have held several free local events to screen patients for some of the warning signs of heart disease: high blood pressure, high blood glucose, and/or high cholesterol.

 

“The profession of pharmacy is very progressive in finding new ways for positive interaction with patients. Pharmacists can provide immunizations, medication therapy management, medication counseling, disease management counseling and more,” said Natalie Rosario, co-chair of this year’s Operation Heart Committee.

 

Each year they are encouraged to "dream big" in order to expand the program outside of Lexington, where they reached approximately 726 participants in the first few years. 

In 2012-2013, the group expanded the screenings to the Hazard community in Eastern Kentucky. There, they were able to screen and educate 350 individuals about the health risk of heart disease and the benefits of living a health modified lifestyle.

 

Over the span of six years, they have been able to screen approximately 1,800 individuals all over Kentucky, targeting high-risk people who are more prone to heart disease.

 

“Each co-chair has different ideas for goals, but this allows room for growth and development within the committee each year. Having a variety of goals is what has made Operation Heart have such high impact over the last six years,” Rosario said.

 

This year's committee realized how important it is for mothers of small children to follow through with heart health screenings, but knew that it is impossible for some due to lack of childcare. After teaming up with Chrysalis House, they hosted a family day where the mothers received patient-centered care while program staff entertained their children with activities such as corn hole and coloring.

 

“Sometimes it is more than a blood pressure reading,” Rosario said. “It's about listening to patient concerns and addressing them with guided help.”

 

As the years come and go, the committee makeup varies as members graduate and new members join, events grow, and more people are reached, but in the end the University College of Pharmacy has an individual's best interest at heart.

 

“It is so refreshing to know you have made an impact on someone’s life,” Rosario said.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact:  Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

 

 

 

Versatile PhD Helps Students, Faculty, Alumni Find Non-academic Careers

Thu, 04/21/2016 - 09:19

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 22, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Graduate School has adopted an online service, Versatile PhD, that will benefit students, faculty and alumni seeking careers in the humanities and social sciences.

 

“A growing number of graduate students are drawn to careers outside of traditional academic paths. In a survey of UK graduate students conducted earlier this year, 82 percent of the respondents indicated they are planning or considering alternate-academic or non-academic careers,” Morris A. Grubbs, assistant dean in the Graduate School and director of graduate student professional development, said. “Versatile PhD is the most robust online resource available to them, and one that offers direct opportunities for networking with peers and employers.”

 

Versatile PhD is an online resource to help graduate and doctoral students in all fields identify, prepare for and succeed in non-academic careers through the PhD Career Finder. Graduate students will be able to access resources from the experiences of real doctoral students who have gone in new professional directions including:

· Résumés: Authentic résumés and cover letters that got doctoral students their first jobs away from the faculty track, with detailed analysis that describes how they made the non-academic pivot and showing the application and hiring process step-by-step

· Bios: Inspiring first‐person stories by experienced non-academic doctoral students describing how their careers evolved over several years after moving out of the academy, including promotions, advancement and signature accomplishments

· Panels: Detailed inside information on a wide range of specific PhD‐friendly careers provided by doctoral students in those careers, along with their answers to a wide range of member questions.

 

Heather Sawyer, an anthropology student in the Graduate School, said she is still learning about Versatile PhD, but is excited for what it has to offer.

 

“The challenge I am now facing as I near the end of my degree program is how to translate and apply these skills to a career outside the tenure track. I feel Versatile PhD is a great tool for job seekers with doctoral degrees who wish to better navigate the non-academic job market and transform their academic skills for broader applications," Sawyer said. "This is a fantastic resource!”

 

UK currently has an institutional subscription for the humanities and social sciences areas of Versatile PhD, but based on usage statistics and feedback from users this year, the Graduate School will consider purchasing a subscription for the STEM areas as well.

 

The mission of the Graduate School is to promote excellence at all levels of graduate education at the University of Kentucky. By encouraging and supporting the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge in an environment of diversity and interdisciplinary cooperation, the UK Graduate School aides graduate programs in preparing students as future leaders of the global society in research, teaching, applied science, creative production, policymaking and public service.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

 

UK Athletics Again Scores High on NCAA APR

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 15:31

LEXINGTON, Ky., (April 21, 2016) — The NCAA released its Academic Progress Rate report Wednesday, showing that all 22 of the University of Kentucky sports teams surpassed the NCAA cut score. Twenty of the 22 squads exceeded the national average for public universities in their sports and, for the first time in school history, every Wildcat team scored at least 950.

 

Men’s basketball, men’s golf, rifle and women’s cross country led the way with perfect 1,000 scores, followed by gymnastics and volleyball with scores of 995. Twelve total UK teams scored a 990 or better. Fifteen of the 22 Wildcat teams improved or maintained their scores from a year ago.

 

The marks are a four-year composite, covering the 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14 and 2014-15 school years, taking a real-time look at a team’s academic success by the progress of each student-athlete on scholarship. The APR measures academic eligibility, retention and graduation.

 

Every Division I sports team across the nation calculates its APR each academic year, similar to a report card. Scholarship student-athletes each semester earn one point for remaining eligible and one point for staying in school or graduating.

 

The NCAA cut score to compete in the 2016-17 postseason is a 930 four-year APR. Teams scoring below 930 can face consequences intended to direct additional focus on academics. Those penalties can include practice restrictions and playing-season reductions.

 

“Our students, coaches and staff have embraced our commitment to academics as a central part of our mission as a department,” UK Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart said. “Our strong team APR scores and the progress our students continue to make toward graduation are proof of that. We will continue to be diligent as we help young people prepare for their journeys through life after UK.”

 

The 20 Wildcat teams that exceeded the national average among public universities in their sports included the six teams listed above, along with men’s tennis (994), women’s soccer (993), women’s track indoor (991), women’s track outdoor (991), softball (990), women’s swimming and diving (990), men’s cross country (989), women’s basketball (987), women’s tennis (985), baseball (984), men’s swimming and diving (979), men’s track indoor (977), men’s track outdoor (977) and men’s soccer (972).

 

Another highlight of the report was that 12 UK teams notched perfect 1,000 scores for the 2014-15 school year: men's basketball, men’s cross country, men’s golf, men’s soccer, men’s tennis, women’s basketball, women’s cross country, gymnastics, softball, women’s soccer, volleyball and rifle.

 

Last week, a school-record four UK teams — women’s cross country, men’s golf, rife and men’s basketball — received public recognition for their APR being in the top 10 percent of their sport.

 

With each team exceeding the NCAA cut score, no Wildcat squads are subject to penalties, such as scholarship reductions or postseason restrictions. None of UK's 22 teams have incurred a penalty during the 12-year history of the APR.

 

For the latest on the Kentucky athletics, follow @UKathletics on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, as well as on the web at www.UKathletics.com.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Eric Lindsey, 859-257-3838.

 

 

12 UK Students, Alumni Win NSF Research Fellowships

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 15:20
LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2016) – The University of Kentucky Office of Nationally Competitive Awards has announced that 12 of the university's students and alumni have been selected to receive government-funded National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships. The fellowships award more than $100,000 to use toward research-based master's or doctoral degrees. In addition, four other UK students and alumni received honorable mention recognition from the NSF.

 

This year's selection of a dozen UK students and alumni for NSF Graduate Research Fellowships is believed to be the largest in the school's history and is four times the number of selections for 2015. To put more of emphasis on the fellowship, Pat Whitlow, director of the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards, hosted an informational luncheon last fall with current fellowship recipients for students interested in the program.

 

"The goal was to encourage more undergraduate and graduate students to apply for the NSF GRFP because we believe UK students are underrepresented as recipients of this major national award. We are delighted with the strong results we achieved in this award cycle," Whitlow said.

 

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program helps ensure the vitality of the human resource base of science and engineering in the U.S. and reinforces its diversity. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based graduate degrees in the U.S. and abroad. 

 

NSF fellows receive a three-year annual stipend of $34,000 along with a $12,000 cost of education allowance for tuition and fees. They also are given opportunities for international research and professional development, and the freedom to conduct their own research at any accredited U.S. institution of graduate education they choose.

 

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship benefits are a blessing to many of the nation's brightest up-and-coming researchers. "The NSF Fellowship allows me to pursue my PhD with my full focus on research and education, as opposed to needing to seek financial aid for living expenses," said Cassandra Jean Porter, a UK chemical engineering senior. "In addition, being part of this prestigious group of fellows opens up research and job opportunities for my future."

 
UK’s newest NSF fellows and the areas of research they will be pursuing are:

· Sarah Barney, a 2014 natural resources and environmental science graduate from Lexington, who will pursue research in ecology at University of Michigan;

· Robert Alan Cass, a mathematics senior, Chellgren Fellow and Honors Program member from Lexington, who will pursue research in algebra, number theory and combinatorics at Harvard University;

· Michael Scott Crocker, a 2015 chemical engineering graduate from Bowling Green, Kentucky, who will pursue research in chemical synthesis at Vanderbilt University;

· Matthew Fahrbach, a 2015 computer science graduate and Chellgren Fellow from Louisville, Kentucky, who will continue to pursue research in algorithms and theoretical foundations at Georgia Institute of Technology;

· Charles Sanders Fieseler, a 2013 mathematics graduate and Chellgren Fellow from Versailles, Kentucky, who will pursue research in atomic, molecular and optical physics at University of Washington;

· Marc Higginson-Rollins, a 2015 electrical engineering graduate and former Honors Program member from Franklin, Tennessee, who will pursue research in electrical and electronic engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology;

· Christopher Karounos, a 2014 biology graduate and former Honors Program member from Lexington, who will pursue research in ecology at University of Michigan;

· Jessime Murray Kirk, a 2014 chemistry graduate from Wallingford, Kentucky, who will pursue research in bioinformatics and computational biology at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;

· Edward Limin Lo, a UK graduate student in geology from Brandon, Florida, who will pursue research in the paleoclimate;

· Andrew Arthur Nelson, a UK doctoral student in experimental psychology from Spokane, Washington, who will pursue research in social psychology;

· Cassandra Jean Porter, a chemical engineering senior and Honors Program member from Georgetown, Kentucky, who will pursue research in chemical engineering at Yale University; and

· Danielle Coty Schaper, a doctoral student in physics from Covington, Kentucky, who will pursue research in the nuclear field.

 

The UK NSF Fellowship winners are excited to have funding for their specific research, especially those in fields where funding can be more scarce. "A lot of ecology funding is awarded to scientists researching the negative effects of climate change and biodiversity loss. For a variety of reasons, there seems to be less ecology research specifically exploring solutions to those problems. I am excited at the opportunity this fellowship gives me to research how to leverage our knowledge of ecology to solve environmental issues. Issues that are important not only to our long-term economy but to the survival of millions of people," alumnus Christopher Karounos said. "Thanks to the NSF Fellowship I have the freedom to do my thesis project in Ecuador on Third Millennium Alliance’s reserve where I will research reforestation and agroforestry."

 

Four other UK students and alumni received honorable mention recognition from the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program. The other students and alumni receiving recognition are: Shannon Brady, a 2014 biology graduate from Edgewood, Kentucky; Douglas Davenport, a 2015 chemical engineering graduate from Dayton, Ohio; Cyrus Hettle, a current graduate student in mathematics and 2014 classics and mathematics graduate from Lexington; and Samuel Saarinen, a graduating mathematics senior and Honors Program member from Shelbyville, Kentucky

 

The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program is the country’s oldest graduate fellowship program directly supporting graduate students in social science and various STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) fields since 1952.

 

The UK Office of Nationally Competitive Awards will host another panel on the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship for interested students this coming August. Although details will be announced later in the summer, those interested may email Whitlow at pat.whitlow@uky.edu to be kept up to date on programming related to the fellowship.

 

Part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education, the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards assists current UK undergraduate and graduate students and recent alumni in applying for external scholarships and fellowships funded by sources (such as a nongovernment foundation or government agency) outside the university. These major awards honor exceptional students across the nation. Students who are interested in any of these opportunities are encouraged to begin work with Pat Whitlow at the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards well in advance of the scholarship deadline.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Offers Many Ways to Help Ecuador's People After Earthquake

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 15:20

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2016) — A 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck Ecuador on Saturday, April 16. The epicenter was in Manabi province, in the Ecuadorian coastline, where many cities and villages have been devastated.

 

According to CNN, the quake has killed at least 413 people and more than 2,500 have been injured.

 

Several countries and organizations have come together to support to the Ecuadorian people, including a group of Ecuadorian physicians who are completing their residency and fellowship training in the U.S., Canada and Spain. Among these physicians is pediatric neurology resident at UK HealthCare, Dr. Ana C. Albuja.

 

Albuja, together with the support of close to 100 physicians from various universities and hospitals including UK HealthCare, Duke University, University of Chicago, Emory University, University of Texas-Houston, Cleveland Clinic and Mayo Clinic, have launched a GoFundMe campaign to raise funds to support Ecuadorians in such a time of desperate need.

 

“Thousands of others are directly affected, having lost their homes and sources of income,” Albuja said.

 

“Rescue efforts are underway and there is an urgent need for food, clean water, clothing and tents to serve as provisional shelter,” according to the GoFundMe website. “Medical missions are also taking place, with a critical need for medical supplies.”

 

According to the Albuja, all donations will be devoted to either support immediate rescue efforts by the Ecuadorian Red Cross or to support Archdiocese of Quito, an organization that is currently administering charitable donations for disaster victims. The campaign is also seeking donations of medical supplies.

 

Currently, the campaign’s goal is to fundraise $100,000, and the group has already raised more than $50,000.

 

“We are impressed about the $50,000… Somebody donated $18,000 which helped boost our numbers,” Albuja said. “Every donation counts. We very much appreciate your support to the victims of this disaster, and to the Ecuadorian people as a whole.”

 

In addition to the GoFundMe campaign, Samantha Almeida, an Ecuadorian UK student in the College of Communication and Information, has been in contact with one of her professors in Ecuador, who suggested another avenue to provide support to the community, a crowd-funding campaign launched by Global Shapers Quito Hub.

 

The organization has created an Indiegogo campaign for Ecuador along with EcoGlobal, international friends and several other organizations including the WWF Ecuador. The campaign aimed to raise $8,000 and surpassed its goal within less than 24 hours. The campaign has raised over $85,000 to date.

 

UK Shoulder to Shoulder Global (STSG), along with partners Timmy Global Health (TGH) and the foundation Hombro a Hombro also have initiated a funding relief campaign to support the emergent needs in the disaster areas. STSG and TGH will send all donated funds to Hombro a Hombro, a health care non-profit in Ecuador to support supplies and relief work. The clinic staff of Central Salud Hombro a Hombro are already in the coastal area providing emergency health care in coordination with the Ecuador Ministry of Health.

 

To support this effort in Santo Domingo, visit https://timmyglobalhealth.org/online-donation-form/. Indicate in comment section that this is for STSG and select "Ecuador Earthquake Relief 2016" from the dropdown under "Please use my donation."

 

To donate to the GoFundMe international campaign, please click here. For medical supply donations and other information, please contact Ana C. Albuja via email at ana.albuja@uky.edu.

 

To donate to the Indiegogo campaign launched by Global Shapers Quito, please click here.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

UK Study Answers Tobacco Usage Questions

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 15:06

LEXINGTON, Ky., (April 22, 2016) — Consumers are not substituting electronic cigarettes for traditional cigarettes, a University of Kentucky researcher found during his study of habit formation with noncigarette products.

 

As principal investigator in a study funded by the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Tobacco Products, Yuqing Zheng, an agricultural economist in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, studied usage in five categories of tobacco products, including cigarettes, e-cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, cigarillos and cigars. Cigarettes account for about 80 percent of all tobacco sales.

 

“Cigarette purchases have dropped a bit, from about 90 percent to 80 percent of all tobacco products during the past 15 years, but it’s still a big player. Other tobacco product sales are growing, though — particularly e-cigarettes,” Zheng said.

 

The appearance of a new product on the market, such as e-cigarettes, spurred Zheng and the research team, comprised of the University of Georgia's Chen Zhen; James Nonnemaker in the Public Health Research Division at RTI International; and Daniel Dench, a doctoral student in the City University of New York, to study data collected from convenience stores from 30 U.S. markets. They examined the data for any empirical evidence to suggest e-cigarettes had become a substitute for traditional cigarettes.

 

The team also modeled consumer response to price changes and advertising. One way they reviewed the data was looking at cross price elasticity.

 

“If e-cigarette prices go up, making them too expensive, you might think people would switch to traditional cigarettes,” he said. “In that case, we would see cigarette demand going up, indicating people are substituting cigarettes for e-cigarettes. But we’re not finding that relationship, based on the economics.”

 

He did, however, discover a relationship between e-cigarettes and television advertising. Comparing three years of sales data to expenditures on television and magazine e-cigarette advertising, Zheng found a correlation between television ads and an increased demand for e-cigarettes.

 

“This adds to the policy discussion,” he said. “While cigarettes are strictly regulated in terms of advertising, there are no advertising restrictions on e-cigarettes.”

 

Smokeless tobacco product advertising increased demand for those products, as well. He did not find any significant impact on e-cigarette demand arising from magazine advertising.

 

Based on the strength of a previous period’s consumption compared to the current period, Zheng’s data also indicated that consumers displayed some type of habit-forming behavior with all five tobacco products in the study.

 

“If they used it in the last period, they are likely to continue to use it. And we found that e-cigarettes displayed the highest degree of habit formation,” Zheng said.

 

He attributes that to three things. First, most e-cigarettes contain nicotine, which is known to be addictive. E-cigarettes can also be used in many places that do not permit cigarettes. And finally, unlike cigarettes, people often draw on them for long periods of time, since they don’t burn out as a traditional cigarette would.

 

“We should emphasize that a lot of people say e-cigarettes are less harmful than cigarettes, although there is no scientific conclusion on this yet,” Zheng said. “But definitely, manufacturers are advertising e-cigarettes as a tobacco-cessation product.”

 

Zheng’s study also concluded that traditional cigarettes showed the least price elasticity, meaning that a price increase does not greatly affect demand. Generally speaking, consumers of non-cigarette tobacco products are more responsive to price increases.

 

The American Journal of Agricultural Economics recently published Zheng’s study.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit  uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324; Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200.

Mindful Eating Helps to Lose Weight — and Keep it Off

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 14:57

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2016) - Losing weight is difficult, and keeping it off can be even harder. Many people regain the weight because typical weight loss diets involve drastic, unsustainable changes. Alternatively, learning to eat “mindfully” can fundamentally shift our relationship with food for long-term weight loss maintenance.

 

In our busy, convenience-oriented lives, eating has become an automatic behavior. Research shows we make more than 200 eating decisions daily, but we sometimes don’t take time to think about them. Instead, we often eat mindlessly, or out of habit. In a culture where we are surrounded by unhealthy food options, this has understandably led to a lot of weight gain.

 

Mindfulness means paying attention, on purpose, to the present moment — without placing judgment. Mindfulness-based approaches have been used with success in the treatment of health issues like stress, depression, eating disorders and chronic pain. When we apply mindfulness to eating, it helps us support our long-term health and wellbeing, because we learn to slow down and recognize when we’re truly hungry and when we’ve had enough to eat.

 

It’s not about meditating over breakfast — but about continually paying attention to how food affects us, so that we can make better eating choices. With gentle and attentive practice, we can reprogram the behaviors and reactions that cause us to eat mindlessly. This can lead to lasting changes from to how we react when there’s food in social situations to how we shop for and prepare food.

 

It might seem daunting to learn eat mindfully, but with practice it can become a habit. Here are few tips and resources to get started:

 

–   Before you eat, stop and ask yourself why you’re eating. Is your body actually hungry?

–   Your stomach is about the size of your clenched fist, so try to eat just that amount at one time. It actually takes 20 minutes for the brain to recognize that you are full, so try to wait before getting a second helping.

–   Pay attention to physical signs of hunger and fullness. Eat when you’re slightly hungry (not starving), and stop when you don’t feel hungry anymore (not full or stuffed).  

–   Take time to look at your food, smell your food, and taste your food more slowly to really experience it.

–   Minimize distractions (like screens) while eating. Sit down and focus your attention only on your food and your body.

 

For more information, some useful resources include The Mindful Diet from Duke Integrative Medicine (https://www.dukeintegrativemedicine.org/research/the-mindful-diet/) and the “Am I Hungry?” Mindful Eating Program (amihungry.com).

 

Researchers at the University of Kentucky are looking for people who are interested in participating in a study about how mindfulness affects weight loss. For details, please contact Teresa Lee at 859.619.3640 or teresalee@uky.edu or visit ukclinicalresearch.com.

 

Teresa Lee, RD, LD, is a teaching assistant in the University of Kentucky Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition.

 

Media Contact: Mallory Powell at mallory.powell@uky.edu

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

Portion of Stadium Blue Lot Unavailable Thursday

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 14:53

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2016) — A portion of the Commonwealth Stadium Blue Lot will be unavailable from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, April 21, to facilitate guest parking for a Center for Applied Energy Research event featuring the U.S. Secretary of Energy. A total of 85 spaces will be impacted.

 

The Blue Lot is designated as a K Lot, meaning that students and employees with valid K, commuter, residential or employee permits may park in this area.

 

Students with valid K permits who normally park their vehicles in this lot may park in other Stadium lots, including the Red Lot, Soccer/Softball lots and the Greg Page Overflow Lot. Members of the campus community with valid commuter, residential or employee permits who typically park in this lot may park in other lots matching their permit designation.

 

Visit www.uky.edu/pts/parking-info_parking-maps to view a campus parking map.

Two UK Faculty Help Draft Policy Statement for the American Heart Association

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 14:42

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2016) − University of Kentucky’s Dr. Larry Goldstein and Donna Arnett, Ph.D., took part in drafting a policy statement that was published in the American Heart Association’s (AHA) flagship journal Circulation this month.

 

The statement was intended to provide a thorough review of the scientific underpinnings  of the AHA’s public advocacy strategies as they pertain to the association's 2020 Strategic Impact Goals, which target a 10-year 20 percent improvement in the cardiovascular health of all Americans and a 20 percent reduction in deaths from cardiovascular disease and stroke.

 

"Our goal was to assist the AHA in determining how well the best available science aligns with the AHA’s public policy goals and identify research opportunities that would help fill gaps and support their further development," said Goldstein, the paper's co-lead author.

 

According to Arnett, the consensus was that there was generally close alignment between current policy and the 2020 metrics; however, some policies require a more robust evidence base.

 

"We were particularly concerned about cardiovascular health metrics by age, which currently are divided into just two groups: children up to age 20 and adults," Arnett said. "Since there are important differences in policy needs for infants, children, adolescents, and young adults, we'd like to see research that informs policy for each of these subgroups."

 

The intent of the AHA 2020 Impact Goals is to improve epidemiological factors (physical activity, healthy diet, tobacco use, and healthy weight) that contribute to cardiovascular health and refine clinical response (improved acute care processes and secondary prevention therapies) to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease and stroke.

 

Policies stemming from these goals include efforts to promote smoking cessation, improve BMI, reduce consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, and encourage behaviors that promote healthy cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose levels.

 

"We hope that this intensive review will aid in translation and implementation of current policies, provide a roadmap to expand and strengthen the evidence base for the development of new policies, and help evaluate their overall impact in terms of targeted improvements in population health," said Goldstein.

 

With more than 35 years of practice, Goldstein is the chair of the University of Kentucky's Department of Neurology and co-director of the Kentucky Neuroscience Institute. He served as the co-chair of the writing group, providing his expertise on how evidence-based research can help public health organizations realize their organizational goals and policies.

 

As a transformative leader with core values of excellence, Arnett serves as dean of the UK College of Public Health and is also the former president of the American Heart Association. Her professional efforts have focused on bringing public health, medicine and other health-related disciplines closer together to improve population health.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact:  Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

 

Big Blue Family VIDEO: Daughter’s UK Experience Leads Family to “see blue.” Too

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 14:31

 

 

Video Produced by UK Public Relations & Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.  If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2016) — UK senior Malia Dunn-Reier describes the first time she set foot on the University of Kentucky campus as “love at first sight.”

 

“I just kind of knew that it was where I wanted to be and so I made that decision to come six hours away,” said the Chicago-area native.

 

Her mother, Lori Dunn-Reier recognized it, too.

 

“Malia wanted the ultra-traditional college experience with all the school spirit and everything that went along with the strong academic programs,” her mother said. “She just knew and it was just like a some peace of mind (for me) because this was going to be a good fit for her.”

 

Lori and her husband, Michael encouraged Malia to get involved when she came to UK as a freshman in 2012.

 

“Just like we had supported her in high school we wanted to support her in her college experience even though we were six hours away,” Lori Dunn-Reier said.

 

That support meant many trips back and forth between their home near Chicago and Lexington. They also became involved in the UK Parent Assocation. As the Dunn-Reier family visited campus and watched Malia’s college career develop, the admiration for Lexington and UK grew. 

 

“I love everything about the town and the campus and her professors have been so accessible to her, everybody I've met has been so kind,” Lori Dunn-Reier said. “You hear that term Southern hospitality, well I've seen it played out and it is true and it is genuine.”

 

That love even extended to Lori’s husband, Michael, and the Big Blue Nation as the family started attending Kentucky Wildcat football and basketball games. 

 

“A couple of years ago Malia and her dad had a bet over basketball and he lost,” Lori Dunn-Reier said. “It was the year we were a little up and down with things, so he now has a UK tattoo, so it truly is part of us!”

 

But the UK tattoo was just the beginning. Watch the video above to discover why the Dunn-Reier family ended up moving to Lexington from the Chicago-area and how Malia and her mom, Lori, both ended up working in UK’s International Center as they help students discover the world through Education Abroad.

 

This video feature is part of a special series produced by UKNow focusing on families who help make up the University of Kentucky community. There are many couples, brothers and sisters, mothers and sons and fathers and daughters who serve at UK in various fields. The idea is to show how UK is part of so many families’ lives and how so many families are focused on helping the university succeed each and everyday. 

  

Since the "Big Blue Family" series is a monthly feature on UKNow, we invite you to submit future ideas. If you know of a family who you think should be featured, please email us.  Who knows? We might just choose your suggestion for our next feature!

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

VIDEO CONTACTS:  Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu

 

Student Entries Sought for Traditions T Contest

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 14:07

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2016) — Submissions are being sought for the annual Traditions T design contest at the University of Kentucky.

 

The Traditions T, sponsored by the UK Alumni Association, is a means to unite the UK student body in celebrating what it means to be a Wildcat. Artwork is student-designed, and the UK student body will vote to determine the winning design.

 

The winning student will receive a $500 cash prize along with five shirts to give to friends or family.

 

Contestants need to submit their design at www.ukalumni.net/traditionst. The deadline to submit designs is Monday, April 25. For information, contact Jill Smith at jhsmith@uky.edu.

 

The UK Alumni Association is a membership supported organization committed to fostering lifelong engagement among alumni, friends, the association and the university. For more information about the UK Alumni Association or to become a member, visit www.ukalumni.net or call 1-800-269-2586.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UK Orchestra, Choirs End Season With Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 13:11

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2016) — The University of Kentucky's Symphony Orchestra and Choirs will close their season with the "symphony to end all symphonies" Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphony No. 9. The concert, which also includes music by Igor Stravinsky performed with soloist and Lexington native Nathan Cole, will begin 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 22, in the Singletary Center for the Arts. The concert is free and open to the public.

 

The concert will begin with a performance of Stravinsky's Violin Concerto in D. The neoclassical work written for American violinist Samuel Dushkin in 1931 will be performed with Cole, first associate concertmaster of the Los Angeles Philharmonic.

 

Nathan Cole performs at ArtistWorks booth at NAMM 2014.

 

Cole, who joined the Los Angeles Philharmonic in 2011, has appeared as guest concertmaster with the orchestras of Pittsburgh, Minnesota, Houston, Ottawa, Seattle and Oregon. He was previously a member of the Chicago Symphony and principal second violin of the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra. Cole made his debut with the Louisville Orchestra at the age of 10 while studying with Donna Wiehe.

 

After eight years working with UK Professor of Violin Daniel Mason, Cole enrolled at the Curtis Institute of Music. In addition to his studies there with Pamela Frank, Felix Galimir, Ida Kavafian and Jaime Laredo, Cole formed the Grancino String Quartet, debuting in New York’s Weill Hall. Several summers at Marlboro enriched his love of chamber music. While in Chicago, Cole taught at Roosevelt University and coached the Chicago Civic Orchestra. He is currently on the faculty at the Colburn School for the Performing Arts, with classes at the Colburn Conservatory and University of Southern California. Cole's articles and photographs have appeared in Strings, Symphony and Chamber Music magazines. He is an online teaching artist with ArtistWorks. The Nathan Cole School of Violin includes a video curriculum of all major orchestral excerpts, plus concertos, etudes and fundamental lessons.

 

Fittingly, the UK Symphony Orchestra and UK Choir's season will end with Beethoven's masterpiece, Symphony No. 9, written in the composer's final and more experimental period of output. In the epic work, Beethoven expanded the forces of the orchestra to include auxiliary instruments like piccolo and contrabassoon in the woodwinds, trombones and additional French horns in the brass, and bass drum, triangle and cymbals in the percussion section. This large orchestra offered the composer an extended palette from which to paint his musical pictures, and would build the foundation for the romantic symphonists to come. The symphony's final movement is recognizable to audiences worldwide in Beethoven's use of "Ode to Joy," an ode written by Friedrich Schiller.

 

Adding their voices to this work is UK Choirs, comprised of UK Chorale, UK Choristers UK Men’s Chorus and UK Women’s Choir, as well as four soloists: soprano and UK graduate student Stafford Hartman; mezzo-soprano Magdalena Wór; tenor and UK alumnus Jeremy Cady; and bass and UK doctoral student André Campelo.

 

To hear more about this concert, visit WUKY online at http://wuky.org/post/uk-symphony-orchestra-takes-stravinsky-beethoven.

 

The UK Choirs fosters excellence in music, service and comradeship. Striving to blend diverse voices into one choir that achieves the highest level of professionalism and musicianship. Through unparalleled discipline and dedication, the UK Choirs proudly extends its reach beyond the boundaries of UK campus and into the Bluegrass community, country and world.

 

The UK Symphony Orchestra is a 100-member all-student orchestra presenting more than 50 concerts each year, including classical, chamber and education concerts. The group is made up of undergraduate and graduate students from across the United States, Asia, South America and Europe. Under the direction of John Nardolillo, the UK Symphony Orchestra has enjoyed great success accumulating recording credits and sharing the stage with such acclaimed international artists as Itzhak Perlman, Lynn Harrell and Mark O'Connor, as well as the Boston Pops. In addition to its own concerts, UK Symphony Orchestra provides accompaniment for much of the UK Opera Theatre season. UK's orchestra is one of a very select group of university orchestras under contract with Naxos, the world's largest classical recording label.

 

The UK Symphony Orchestra and UK Choirs are housed at the UK School of Music at UK College of Fine Arts. The school has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: April 21, 1912

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 10:49

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 203rd diary entry from April 21, 1912, recalls preparations for an exam in Latin and a day out on the town with her friends.  

 

Apr. 21st. I study for Latin (intermittently). Read Ladies Home Journal. Annie Louise tells a joke in the evening. The exam wasn’t hard. Addie, Lillian, Jessie Mit, and I go to town in the afternoon. Seems like old times.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Apply to be a Diplomat for Diversity

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 10:25

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2016) — The Center for Graduate and Professional Diversity Initiatives (CGPDI) is now accepting applications for its new program — Diplomats for Diversity.

 

Diplomats for Diversity is a new program within CGPDI launching this fall. The program is open to all University of Kentucky juniors, seniors, graduate and professional students who are interested in engaging the campus community in dialogue surrounding social justice, diversity and equity issues.

 

Diplomats will serve as peer educators available to faculty, staff and student organizations on campus. Diplomats will have the opportunity to enhance their facilitation techniques, develop leadership skills and aid in creating a campus climate where differences are understood, appreciated and valued. Diplomats will receive specialized training and compensation for their service.

 

For more information or to request an application, email CenterGPDI@uky.edu. Visit the CGPDI website or stop by their office in 307A Kentucky Clinic.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UPK Author Wins Eugene Feit Award for Civil War History

Wed, 04/20/2016 - 09:39

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2016)University Press of Kentucky (UPK) author Brian R. McEnany has been chosen to receive the Eugene Feit Award for Civil War History for “For Brotherhood and Duty: The Civil War History of the West Point Class of 1862.”

 

The Feit Award is given by the New York Military Affairs Symposium (NYMAS) to authors writing on Civil War history. The organization is devoted to increasing public knowledge, awareness and understanding of the interrelationship of war, society and culture through the presentation and dissemination of diverse scholarly viewpoints. The NYMAS Civil War Book Award was instituted in 2002, and it became the Feit Award in 2010.

 

In “For Brotherhood and Duty,” McEnany follows the cadets of the West Point class of 1862 from their initiation, through coursework and on the battlefield, focusing on 12 Union and four Confederate soldiers. Drawing heavily on primary sources, McEnany presents a fascinating chronicle of the young classmates, who became allies and enemies during the largest conflict ever undertaken on American soil. Their vivid accounts provide new perspectives not only on legendary battles such as Antietam, Gettysburg, Fredericksburg, and the Overland and Atlanta campaigns, but also on lesser-known battles such as Port Hudson, Olustee, High Bridge and Pleasant Hills. Generously illustrated with more than 100 photographs and maps, this enthralling collective biography illuminates the war’s impact on a unique group of soldiers and the institution that shaped them.

 

McEnany graduated from the United States Military Academy with the class of 1962 and served in artillery assignments in Germany, Korea and the United States, and combat service in Vietnam. A retired lieutenant colonel and operations research analyst, he is the author of several historical articles about West Point during the Civil War.

 

UPK previously won the Arthur Goodzeit Book Award for Best Book on Military History from the NYMAS for “The Schlieffen Plan: International Perspectives on the German Strategy for World War I,” edited by Hans Ehlert, Michael Epkenhans and Gerhard P. Gross, but this is the first book from UPK to win the Feit Award.

 

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that includes all of the state universities, five private colleges, and two historical societies. The press’ editorial program focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production and marketing departments of the press are found at the University of Kentucky, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation through the UK Libraries.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

 

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