Campus News

New Gatton Building Grand Opening Set for Oct. 7

Tue, 10/04/2016 - 10:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 5, 2016)  This Friday (Oct. 7), alumni, students, faculty, staff and friends of the University of Kentucky Gatton College of Business and Economics will gather to celebrate the official grand opening of the new facility. The celebration will begin at 10:30 a.m. in Gatton’s Kincaid Auditorium.

 

The new Gatton College building is already transforming business education at UK, preparing the next generation of business leaders with advanced technology and engaged learning. The $65 million project is the first academic building on UK’s campus to be funded entirely through philanthropy. Thanks to the generosity of alumni and donors, the college has reached 97 percent of the fundraising goal for the building.

 

The 210,000-square-foot building fully opened this fall at the “front door” of UK’s campus on South Limestone and Administration Drive. By incorporating and remodeling both the 1963 original Gatton building and its 1992 addition, the college was able to wisely utilize resources and save money while still increasing learning spaces by more than 40 percent over the old Gatton building. But students are not only learning — they're experiencing business in real time in the facility. State-of-the-art, technology enabled classrooms, advanced lecture space, a dedicated real-time finance learning facility and collaborative study spaces throughout the building emphasize the way business is conducted in the 21st century.

 

The Gatton College has seen enrollment increase by 24 percent since construction began. In fall 2016, the college’s enrollment exceeded 3,500 students for the first time.

 

“Gatton College alumni, faculty and students are impacting the Commonwealth and the world every day as business creators, leaders and philanthropists, as well as through influential research that supports economic growth and sound business decision-making,” said David Blackwell, dean of the Gatton College. “I’m proud to be building on the firm foundation that is the legacy of our former deans and college leadership, and look forward to our new facilities allowing us to educate more strong and principled business leaders for the Bluegrass and beyond.”

 

The Gatton building is part of a more than $2.1 billion campus transformation initiated in the last five years that includes classrooms, research space, residence halls, dining and athletics facilities. More than 90 percent of that transformation is being financed with university resources or private giving.

 

Among the highlights of the Gatton facility:

· The 40 percent expansion of the college’s footprint to 210,000 square feet.

· A new main entrance from the interior of the university campus, with the John H. Schnatter Atrium that serves as the "living room" for the college.

· The 500-seat Kincaid Auditorium designed for special events and large lectures. It has already hosted Nobel Peace Prize winner Kailash Satyarthi, Sacramento Kings owner Vivek Ranadivé and Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito, among others.

· A new Behavioral Research Lab.

· The new Seale Finance Learning Center which includes an advanced classroom with a simulated trading environment featuring digital displays feeding real-time financial and market information.

· Twenty new classrooms, including 10 45-seat classrooms; six 85-seat classrooms; three 70-seat classrooms; and one 65-seat classroom.

· More than 40 collaborative study or breakout rooms.

· An outdoor garden plaza which serves as a gathering place for students, faculty and staff to socialize and network on nice weather days.

· Woodward Hall, a special event space with audio-visual components to accommodate dinners and lectures.

· UK Venture Studio, providing a real-world, startup company experience for UK students across campus.

 

For more information, visit http://gatton.uky.edu/grandopening

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200/carl.nathe@uky.edu; Ann Mary Quarandillo, 859-257-0750/annmary.q@uky.edu

UK Promotes National Cyber Security Awareness Month

Mon, 10/03/2016 - 16:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 4, 2016) It’s time for an information security check-up. Get all the #CyberAware details in October and become more alert to the steps you can take to ensure your own cyber security. Individuals and organizations around the world are joining forces in October for National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM). The 13th annual NCSAM encourages everyone to be safer, more secure and better able to protect their personal information. The University of Kentucky is one of over 775 NCSAM Champions who will promote cyber security throughout the month.

 

This year is also the sixth anniversary of "STOP. THINK. CONNECT.," the global online safety awareness and education campaign. "STOP. THINK. CONNECT." developed a “Lock Down Your Login” campaign earlier this year after President Barack Obama issued the Cybersecurity National Action Plan (CNAP) to encourage Americans to endorse multiple factors of authentication when logging in to online accounts. The "Lock Down Your Login" campaign promotes strong authentication and secure login tools for using the internet with greater peace of mind.

 

A recent Raytheon survey of adults 18-26 showed that young people are paying more attention to their role in cyber security, and 92 percent of U.S. respondents agree that we all share the responsibility to keep the internet safe and secure.

 

It’s easy to get involved and support NCSAM. All month long, you can follow the NCSAM conversation on social media using the hashtag #CyberAware and tagging your own posts with the hashtag as well. University of Kentucky Analytics and Technology (UKAT) will post information and tips throughout the month on their website www.uky.edu/ukat, Facebook page and Twitter account. UK students, faculty and staff are encouraged to share the information with others and also participate in weekly twitter chats each Thursday at 3 p.m. EDT hosted by @STOPTHINKCONNECT.  

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

The Reids, Reunited as Wildcats

Mon, 10/03/2016 - 15:23

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 4, 2016)  The University of Kentucky is much more than a university. It is more than the great state it is located in or the number of national championships it has claimed. It is steadfast, dependable and a constant builder of the minds and lives that come to learn from it. Simply, the University of Kentucky is home — it is family.

 

Student Body President Rowan Reid has a unique perspective of what being a part of this family really means. Coming to UK, she loved the diversity of the students campus has to offer. In her position, she serves a university she loves while learning how to lead and represent her peers. She wants to represent the students from all over the state and nation as they are, where they are, and allow this family to grow and flourish in their lives as it has in hers.

 

Her other role on campus? Being a big sister to sophomore, Halle Reid, and freshman, Nathaniel Reid. Everything she has known growing up has now joined her new world. She is able to watch her two families become one.

 

Nathaniel has jumped right into his new life here, getting involved with intramurals and Greek life as he settles into college. He majors in mechanical engineering.

 

“I love meeting all new people here,” Nathaniel said. “These people from across the U.S. want to come here and be a part of the Wildcat life — they want to be UK Wildcats! It’s pretty cool!”

 

Halle is in her first year of UK’s nursing program. She is a member of Chi Omega Sorority and currently plays on two intramural teams, while also coaching the intramural team on which Nathaniel plays.

 

“It’s awesome how we’re all here — back together again,” Nathaniel said.

 

It is exciting to see each of these siblings, with very different interests, majors and paths ahead each find another home here at UK. This university is an amazing place to not only be yourself, but be better together. The Reid siblings have exemplified that in an inspiring way.

 

Rowan enjoys sharing this experience with her siblings just as much as her parents love watching them grow together.

 

“I think our parents really like the fact that we’re all together and can all support each other if anything is going on,” Rowan said. “And they can find us all in one place.”

 

The student experience is not defined by who makes up the student body, but how each student makes it their own. Through different colleges, organizations and experiences, UK is a place where students find their individual niche and walk away knowing they are a part of something much bigger than themselves. This experience is not about “me,” it is about empowering “we.” That is when family truly does grow.

 

This home is not something that stays in Lexington, but follows students forever more because the Wildcat family is not one that fades. Rowan, Halle and Nathaniel have each found their niche, but more than that, they have expanded their family. They will always have each other, and now, they will always have the University of Kentucky.  


Learn more about the Reid family’s experience in the video below.  

Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Rebecca Stratton, rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-323-2395 

UK Grad Student Hermelindo Ruiz Releases New CD 'Vital'

Mon, 10/03/2016 - 14:38

 

Hermelindo Ruiz talks about his book and previous CD on Juan F. Acosta's music, as well as shares music from the CD.

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 4, 2016) University of Kentucky graduate student, classical guitarist and composer Hermelindo Ruiz has been hard at work for the last year and a half putting together his latest project "Vital," a CD of music he's composed throughout his life.

 

"The idea with this CD was to do a compilation of the pieces that I think would resonate with a wider audience. Each piece has its own story and inspiration," Ruiz said. "My goal was to make an album that could appeal both to the people who listen just for merely enjoyment, with very melodic and accessible pieces that I wrote when I was 16 and 17 years old, to more serious and even abstract pieces aimed for more deep listeners."

 

Born in the heart of the mountains of the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico, Ruiz started playing the guitar at the age of eight and hasn't stopped since. He claims his sole purpose for playing throughout his entire life was because he "could not find anything else that gave him more drive and motivation." He moved to the United States in 2010.

 

Ruiz has been described by the National Foundation of Popular Culture as a "refined composer, creative guitarist and an individual of great virtues." His concert performances have taken him to many stages around the world including Carnegie Hall in New York and the Áurreo Herrero Festival in Spain, among others. He was the recipient of the Andrés Segovia-José Miguel Ruiz Morales Prize in 2011 and the Orden Ángel Mislán in 2009 for his first CD, "Juan F. Acosta: Danzas Puertorriqueñas." To date, Ruiz's musical compositions have been performed in France, Slovenia, Italy, Portugal, Mexico, Argentina, Zimbabwe, Thailand, China and Russia.

 

Currently pursuing a doctoral degree at the UK School of Music, Ruiz holds a master's degree and an artist diploma from Yale University and a bachelor's degree from the Music Conservatory of Puerto Rico. Ruiz is a member of the UK Guitar Studio directed by Dieter Hennings, assistant professor of guitar.

 

"Hermelindo Ruiz is the ideal doctoral student. A passionate scholar and composer with an international career well under way. His commitment to his craft continues to take him to concert stages across the world, meanwhile maintaining a rigorous recording schedule. Mr. Ruiz is not only an international ambassador for his beloved Puerto Rico, but for the UK College of Fine Arts, as well," said his mentor, Hennings.

 

For more information on Ruiz and his music projects or to buy his new CD, visit his website.

 

The UK School of Music at the UK College of Fine Arts has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Welcomes Brown Fellows from UofL, Centre

Mon, 10/03/2016 - 13:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 5, 2016) Several University of Kentucky leaders met recently with incoming freshmen of the University of Louisville and Centre College, all part of the Brown Fellows Program of the James Graham Brown Foundation.

 

The James Graham Brown Foundation established the Brown Fellows Program in 2009 to provide an enhanced academic experience for students who demonstrate intellectual, creative and leadership skills. Each year, the program provides a total of 10 “full-ride plus” scholarships to entering freshmen at both Centre College and the University of Louisville. In addition to full scholarship support, the students benefit from a range of enrichment opportunities to support their goals including leadership and service training, international travel, funding for individual enrichment activities anywhere in the world, and dedicated faculty mentoring.

 

The goal of the program is to help the students become outstanding ambassadors for the Commonwealth of Kentucky and to make an impact globally and in their communities.

 

After a welcome from Brian Jackson, interim dean of the UK Graduate School, and an introduction by UK Executive Vice President for Finance and Administration Eric Monday, the UofL and Centre students heard from UK Associate Dean of the Special Collections Research Center Deirdre Scaggs, UK College of Medicine Dean Dr. Robert DiPaola, and Lisa Cassis, UK Vice President for Research, in addition to several UK professors and administrators who led breakout sessions.

 

Part of the Brown Fellows programming includes the “Kentucky Connection,” a series of eight events over four years that take the fellows to all of the major geographic regions of Kentucky, exposing them to various aspects of Kentucky culture and emphasizing an interdisciplinary picture of the Commonwealth, and allowing them to engage with people across the state as they plot their own academic, professional and personal trajectories.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

UK Professor Serves as Central American Visiting Scholar at Harvard University

Mon, 10/03/2016 - 12:34

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 4, 2016) — Abby Córdova, an assistant professor in the University of Kentucky Department of Political Science, is spending the fall semester as a Central America Visiting Scholar at Harvard University. Each year the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies (DRCLAS) selects 10-12 distinguished academics and professionals to spend one or two semesters at Harvard working on their own research and writing projects.

 

Córdova is focusing her research on “Living in a Hotspot: How Gang Activity in Central American Neighborhoods Impacts Political Participation.”

 

“This research project explores the pathways through which gang activity in Central American neighborhoods is affecting the consolidation of democracy in the region,” Cordova said. “I find gang activity is resulting in unequal political participation, excluding from the democratic process historically disadvantaged populations, particularly the poor."

 

“I am very fortunate to be part of DRCLAS and the Harvard community,” she added. “In the past few weeks, I have met prominent scholars and world leaders. These experiences are informing my research and teaching. I look forward to sharing the knowledge I accumulate at Harvard with my students at UK.”

 

The DRCLAS program creates a community of scholars with diverse perspectives on Latin America and offers a unique environment for the scholars to learn from and interact with each other. According to Harvard, this year’s competition was among the most competitive ever, with just over 10 percent of the candidates offered a fellowship.

 

During her time in Cambridge, Córdova will be holding public talks at Harvard University and will participate in a discussion group on Latin American politics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

 

University Health Service to Provide Flu Shot Clinics for Students and Campus Employees

Mon, 10/03/2016 - 10:31

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 4, 2016) — Fall isn’t the only new season arriving in October, flu season is also here again. Influenza is a contagious disease that spreads around the United States every year between the months of October and May. University Health Service will provide several opportunities for students and campus employees to receive the flu vaccine to help protect themselves from flu.

 

Students can receive the vaccination for $10 when they show their student ID card. Campus employees can receive the vaccination for $20 with their employee ID card. Clinics for students and campus employees will be provided on the dates and at the locations listed below.

 

Oct. 4 Chem/Phys Room 114 B from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Oct. 6 UHS First Floor Lobby 3 to 6 p.m.

Oct. 12 W.T. Young Library Gallery Room 4 to 8 p.m.

Oct. 18 UHS First Floor Lobby 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Oct. 19 Johnson Center Lobbu 5 to 7 p.m.

Oct. 26 W.T. Young Library Gallery Room 4 to 8 p.m.

 

Students and campus employees can visit the University Health Service website to find a schedule of flu clinics. Accepted payment methods include PLUS Account, credit card, cash or check.

 

Payment methods are subject to change, follow University Health Service us on twitter @UHSPAWS for updates.

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, (859) 257-1076

 

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UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Strive for Mindful Instead of Mindless Eating Habits

Mon, 10/03/2016 - 09:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 4, 2016) — Have you ever raised and butchered a chicken or a pig or do you get all your meats in nicely sanitized vacuum packed containers? In the process of nurturing our bodies and nurturing our souls, many of us have lost self-balance, hence our obesity epidemic.

 

We have become detached and unaware of our present moment, of our presence in our environment, of our inter-presence. The underlying philosophy of mindful/contemplative eating is to rekindle these senses which we have neglected. To make us aware once again of the sights, smells, sounds, feelings and presence of things in our environment which sustain and nourish our being.

 

To study mindless eating and subconscious eating stimuli, Brian Wansink has conducted extensive studies on these behaviors. For example did you know that you will likely eat twice the amount of jelly beans if there is more than one color in the bowl? The bigger the serving the more you are likely to consume. You may pour 70 percent more liquid and drink 25-30 percent more out of a short, wide glass than a tall glass.

 

How many times have you watched a movie alone and wondered where the popcorn in the bucket disappeared? When served the same wine under different labels, we will generally like the more expense bottle or the wine with the more prestigious looking label. Food marketing is a science built on our subconscious buying and eating stimuli. The more food variety in a food isle the more you are likely to buy.

 

How can we develop mindfulness so that we become more aware of our environment and our relationship to food? We can build in cues to raise our awareness. For example, move tempting foods to less convenient locations so it takes extra effort to reach them, don’t put serving dishes on the table. Instead, get up to get a second helping, remove distractions including turning off the iPhone, iPad and TV — things that take you away from the present moment. Also, use a smaller plate (the portion will look larger), as reminders give blessings for the sources of your food (where did it come from, how was it grown, who might have processed it for you, how did it get to your plate), pay close attention to the smell, texture, color, taste of your food and eat slowly experiencing the “wholeness” of your meal.

 

When possible utilize smaller package size so that you are made aware when the amount is gone. When every 10th Pringle in a package was marked with a food dye compared to no markings people ate fewer chips – every 10th chip is an awakening cue. As an exercise in mindful eating try eating one small square of chocolate slowly over a five minute span and experience the “fullness” of chocolate. A useful website to gain more information can be found at the Center for Mindful Eating http://thecenterformindfuleating.org/about-us.

 

Geza Bruckner is professor of Clinical Nutrition at the UK College of Health Sciences.

 

Media Contact:  Ann Blackford, ann.blackford@uky.edu

I’m Your King and I’m Your Queen

Sun, 10/02/2016 - 17:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 4, 2016) — What's homecoming week without the crowning of a homecoming king and queen? Join Student Activities Board (SAB) today at 7 p.m. at Memorial Hall to recognize a select group of UK students for their achievements and outstanding character.

 

Royalty Showcase is a great way to meet the students nominated for homecoming court. This event will be put on by both the SAB Traditions Committee and the Homecoming Coalition.

 

The Homecoming Royalty Showcase is the selective process to reward students at the University of Kentucky that "see blue." in everything they do. It’s also a great way to see students of various backgrounds representing their respective organizations. The students who are nominated for homecoming court will have a chance to show the reason why they should be this year's homecoming king and queen.

 

“I think it’s so great to have an event like this during homecoming week,” said Jazmine Byrd, director of Traditions. “There are so many wonderful students on this campus who work so hard to exemplify what it means to be a Wildcat and we get to showcase their achievements for the rest of campus to see!”

 

The UK Homecoming king and queen will be presented during halftime of the homecoming football game against Vanderbilt University on Saturday, Oct. 8.

 

For more information about other great UK Homecoming events, check out www.ukalumni.net/s/1052/semi-blank-noimg.aspx?sid=1052&gid=1&pgid=3401.

 

SAB brings more than 60 entertaining, educational and enriching programs that are reflective of contemporary issues and trends to the University of Kentucky annually. These programs are designed to enhance the college experience for students, faculty, staff and the greater Lexington community.

Connect with SAB at www.uksab.org, follow them on Twitter at http://twitter.com/UKSAB, or like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/UKSAB/. For more information about SAB and events, email publicrelations@uksab.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

SAB CONTACT: Kaelin Massey, publicrelations@uksab.org, 859-257-8868

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

 

The Start to Homecoming Weekend

Sun, 10/02/2016 - 17:52

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 5, 2016) — Homecoming weekend begins on Thursday, Oct. 5. The Student Activities Board (SAB) and STAT/Team Wildcat will host the third annual Homecoming Street Fair tomorrow from 5-8 p.m., at the area surrounding William T. Young Library. Kick off homecoming weekend with inflatables, free food, games, entertainment and so much more.

 

“I love the Street Fair and all that it represents for UK’s homecoming,” stated Emilee Hurt, co-chair for the Homecoming Committee for STAT/Team Wildcat. “It has become a tradition over the years and I am so thankful that I can be a part of it!”

 

Street Fair is an anticipated event after the success from the the previous two years. Students can enjoy music from a DJ and play inflatable games. Students will also receive a special homecoming T-shirt that they can wear to the University of Kentucky vs. Vanderbilt University Homecoming football game to show team spirit.

 

“I’m so excited to be a part of this year’s Street Fair,” stated Jill Marks, SAB vice president of Internal Affairs. “It’s a great addition to the thrill of the homecoming week festivities. This is an event for every student to come out and celebrate being a Wildcat!”

 

For more information about other great UK Homecoming events, check out www.ukalumni.net/s/1052/semi-blank-noimg.aspx?sid=1052&gid=1&pgid=3401.

 

SAB brings more than 60 entertaining, educational and enriching programs that are reflective of contemporary issues and trends to the University of Kentucky annually. These programs are designed to enhance the college experience for students, faculty, staff and the greater Lexington community.

Connect with SAB at www.uksab.org, follow them on Twitter at http://twitter.com/UKSAB, or like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/UKSAB/. For more information about SAB and events, email publicrelations@uksab.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

SAB CONTACT: Kaelin Massey, publicrelations@uksab.org, 859-257-8868

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

SAB Wants to Hear From You on Fall 2016 All-Student Survey

Sun, 10/02/2016 - 17:46

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 4, 2016) — The Student Activities Board (SAB) made the fall 2016 All-Student Survey available on Oct. 3. Students can voice what kind of events they would look forward to for the spring 2017 semester. Students who complete the All-Student Survey, sponsored by the SAB Market Research Committee, by Oct. 17 will be entered to win prizes, including a CanonEOS Rebel Digital Camera, Beats Studio Wireless Over-Ear Headphones, Apple Watch Sport, Keurig K40 Elite Brewing System, Amazon Fire TV, Bose Soundlink Mini Bluetooth Speaker II, VIZIO E40-C2 40-Inch 1080p Smart LED TV and Xbox One 500GB Console - Gears of War: Ultimate Edition Bundle.

 

The All-Student Survey gives students an opportunity to share their thoughts and opinions regarding event ideas for all of SAB’s committees, including seven programming committees and four promotions committees. The survey informs SAB’s event programming; without research like the All-Student Survey results, events cannot be proposed to the board.

 

“The All-Student Survey is a great way for the board to be more intentional and representative in our programming,” said Aiyana Adams, the director of Market Research. “By telling us what they want to see on campus, students are making the most accurate usage of their fee dollars and we can plan events that are reflective of campus desires.”

 

Students received the survey via email on Oct. 3. Students can also access the survey via the SAB website and social media. The survey will close Oct. 17. Only full-time students are eligible to win prizes and winners will be drawn at random.

 

SAB brings more than 60 entertaining, educational and enriching programs that are reflective of contemporary issues and trends to the University of Kentucky annually. These programs are designed to enhance the college experience for students, faculty, staff and the greater Lexington community.

Connect with SAB at www.uksab.org, follow them on Twitter at http://twitter.com/UKSAB, or like them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/UKSAB/. For more information about SAB and events, email publicrelations@uksab.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

SAB CONTACT: Kaelin Massey, publicrelations@uksab.org, 859-257-8868

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

Homecoming 2016: Going the Extra Mile

Fri, 09/30/2016 - 15:52

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 3, 2016) — Homecoming.

 

The word alone conjures all sorts of memories, full of emotions, all entrenched in the process of growing up, learning to be the best version of ourselves.

 

Young adults of many cultures navigate that process at a university. The institution grows close to the heart because it’s where they learn to become an adult. From Commencement Day forward, that university will feel like the home they left behind.

 

Colleges and universities celebrate that achievement and pride by inviting current and former students to come home again. This year, the University of Kentucky invites its alumni to return to the Big Blue Nation for its 101st Homecoming, Oct. 1-9. Hundreds of volunteers are "Going the Extra Mile" to make this homecoming a special reunion of Wildcat Pride.

 

"Homecoming is such an exciting time on campus," said Homecoming Coalition Overall Coordinator Garrett Goolsby. "It unifies alumni and students, shows UK pride and celebrates the university's rich tradition."

 

Organizations on campus, such as the Homecoming Coalition, International Student Council, UK Black Student Union and Student Activities Board, among others, play vital roles in this significant weekend at the university. As former students return to campus, they have the opportunity to travel back into their time as a student, reminiscing on their time spent in the classroom, in leadership roles and in various organizations. This year, organization representatives, current and former students, have reflected on why this UK tradition is special to them and how their organizations have been "Going the Extra Mile" to prepare for this homecoming of Wildcats.

 

"The UK Alumni Association looks forward to welcoming back alumni and friends to campus for the 101st Homecoming," Jill Smith, UK Alumni Association associate director for communications, said. "We hope everyone will take advantage of the many opportunities to engage with fellow alumni, UK families and the academic colleges during this special weekend."

 

Homecoming weekend will not only be a time to congregate and cheer on our Cats in Commonwealth, but it will also be a time to celebrate the UK Alumni Band Reunion, recognition of the Golden Wildcat Society, and for the second year in a row, this weekend will be home to Family Weekend and Ag Roundup — generating one big reunion weekend for alumni and families.

 

This year, among numerous happenings university-wide, the Golden Wildcat Reunion will include special events for UK alumni from the class of 1966 or earlier. The stellar Golden Wildcat committee includes Brady Deaton, former chancellor at the University of Missouri; Willis Bright, the first African-American alumnus to receive the Sullivan Award; Sallie Hulette, UK Women & Philanthropy member and a Sullivan Award winner; and Vicki Gorman, UK Women & Philanthropy member.

 

Some events taking place during Homecoming 2016 include the following:

Monday, Oct. 3

Kitty Karnival: 6–8 p.m. on the Main Building Lawn

 

Tuesday, Oct. 4

Royalty Showcase: 7–9 p.m. in Memorial Hall

 

Wednesday, Oct. 5

Mr. and Ms. Black UK: 7–9 p.m. in Memorial Hall

 

Thursday, Oct. 6

Golden Wildcat Reunion Registration: noon–5 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency Lexington

Homecoming Street Fair: 5–8 p.m. around William T. Young Library

UK Opera Theatre's "Ragtime": 7:30 p.m. at the Singletary Center for the Arts

Student Government Trivia Night: 8:30 p.m.

 

Friday, Oct. 7

Golden Wildcat Reunion Induction: 8–10 a.m. in the Commonwealth Stadium Woodford Reserve Lounge

Grand Opening of the New Gatton College of Business and Economics: 10:30–11:30 a.m. in Gatton

Racing and lunch at Keeneland Racetrack: noon–5 p.m. at Keeneland

Going the Extra Mile Homecoming Celebration: 5–7 p.m. at William T. Young Library

African-American Alumni Reception and Awards: 6–8 p.m. at King Alumni House

UK Alumni Band Reception and Dinner: 6–9 p.m. at The Campbell House, in Lexington

2016 National Pan-Hellenic Council Homecoming Step Show: 8 p.m.

 

Saturday, Oct. 8

UK Alumni Association Homecoming Brunch: 9:30–11 a.m. at King Alumni House

Campus Bus Tour: 11 a.m.–noon at the King Alumni House

UK Alumni Association Homecoming Tailgate Tent Party: 1:30 p.m. at the Kentucky Tobacco Research and Development Center Lawn

UK Homecoming Football Game: 4 p.m. at Commonwealth Stadium

 

Sunday, Oct. 9

Golden Wildcat Farewell Breakfast: 8–10 a.m. at Hyatt Regency Lexington

 

For a full list of student events, college events and Alumni Association festivities and descriptions visit www.ukhomecoming.com.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston or Rebecca Stratton, gghair2@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-3302/859-323-2395 

Authors Debate: Is Utopia Flawed or Flawless

Fri, 09/30/2016 - 15:50

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 3, 2016)  In Akash Kapur’s treatise “The Return of the Utopians,” published in today’s issue of The New Yorker magazine, he made liberal reference to University of Kentucky Associate Professor of English Erik Reece’s new book “Utopia Drive.”

 

In “Utopia Drive,” Reece examined the history of a handful of America’s 19th-century utopian settlements and towns in Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, Virginia, New York and Massachusetts, analyzing their histories to find lessons for the present.

 

“One thing we can say about the seductive visionaries who led the utopian movement in America,” Reece wrote, “is that they did not lead the most self-examined lives.”

 

Kapur’s article is an examination of the more frightening aspects of these “intentional communities” as they matured and morphed in the 20th century, displaying the contradictions and hypocrisies that result from “the sordid realities of human nature” that often devolve into tyranny. Kapur offers as examples the tragic histories of Adolf Hitler’s Germany, the Soviet’s Gulag, Pol Pot’s Cambodia and other 20th century nations and communities. Although he states “… utopia’s name has become so tarnished that it has recently been used almost interchangeably with its evil twin, dystopia …” he believes the tide may be turning, as exemplified in the writings of Reece and Chris Jennings’s historical account “Paradise Now: The Story of American Utopianism.”

 

“Reece has a sharp eye for the contradictions of communities that condemn the capitalist economy but are sustained by vibrant commercial enterprises. The founders of these communities — a colorful cast of prophets, dreamers and narcissists — preach against private property and possessions as they jealously guard their own,” wrote Kapur. He adds that the UK author “… ends his travels convinced that things will only get worse if we don’t engage in some serious utopian thinking.”

 

Reece is the author of “An American Gospel: On Family, History and the Kingdom of God” and “Lost Mountain: A Year in the Vanishing Wilderness,” which won Columbia University's John. B. Oakes Award for Distinguished Environmental Journalism and the Sierra Club's David R. Brower Award for Environmental Excellence.

 

His work has appeared in Harper's, Orion, Oxford American, The New York Times and elsewhere. He is a contributing editor at Orion magazine and is currently at work on a book-length argument for the preservation of UK's Robinson Forest, called “The Embattled Wilderness.” He has been teaching writing at UK since 1997.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

UK College of Education Names Stallones Chair of Curriculum and Instruction Department

Fri, 09/30/2016 - 14:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 3, 2016)  Jared Stallones, a nationally recognized expert in teacher preparation, education policy and education history, has been named chair of the University of Kentucky College of Education Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

 

“Jared Stallones is an outstanding educator with a commitment to collaboration across schools, institutions and disciplines,” said UK College of Education Dean Mary John O’Hair. “We look forward to his contributions and leadership in preparing and supporting our current and next generation of educators.”

 

Stallones joins UK from California State University, Long Beach.

 

“I am honored and humbled to work with the distinguished faculty and staff at UK and I look forward to rich collaborations as we advance education in the state, nation and the world,” he said.

 

Stallones completed his bachelor's degree, teaching credential, master's degree and doctoral degree in curriculum studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Following a 20-year career as a teacher and school administrator, Stallones was appointed assistant professor of history at California State University, Fresno, where he taught methods courses, supervised clinical practice, and advised teaching credential candidates. In addition, he served as co-director of the San Joaquin Valley History-Social Science Project, one of several regional subject matter projects supported by the University of California Office of the President. In that role, he worked with local teachers to determine their professional development needs and design programs to meet them.

 

He later moved to California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, where he taught courses in the elementary and secondary credential programs and collaborated with faculty and administrators from colleges as diverse as Agriculture and Environmental Design to provide overall supervision for the campuswide secondary teaching credential program. In his nine years at Cal Poly Pomona, Stallones was promoted to associate and full professor, chaired the Department of Education, authored and led two U.S. Department of Education Teaching American History grants amounting to nearly $2 million, and served in faculty leadership positions in the campus and statewide academic senates. 

 

Most recently, Stallones served as professor of secondary education and university coordinator of the Single Subject Credential Program at California State University, Long Beach (CSU Long Beach), overseeing credential programs across the campus and working with dozens of school districts. 

 

He has authored and led grant-funded projects to prepare teachers, school counselors and site administrators for service in Linked Learning settings. Linked Learning is a college and career readiness reform that is transforming the educational experience of more than 500,000 high school students in California and many more nationwide. After leading revisions of programs at CSU Long Beach, Stallones organized the CSU Collaborative for the Advancement of Linked Learning to spread best practices to educator preparation programs throughout the 23 campus university system.

 

Stallones has authored four books and over 65 articles and presentations on education history, biography and philosophy, and has been recognized for his scholarship with two Cal Poly Pomona Golden Leaves awards, and an Article of the Year Award from the American Educational History Journal. He has held leadership roles in many professional and scholarly organizations, and he serves as general editor for Information Age Publishing’s History of Education Book Series.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, whitney.harder@uky.edu, 859-323-2396

Former UK Faculty, Successful Entrepreneurs Return to Campus for Seminar

Fri, 09/30/2016 - 13:54

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 3, 2016) – Former University of Kentucky faculty members and successful entrepreneurs Elaine and Myron “Mike” Jacobson will return to campus Thursday, Oct. 6 to share their story of success during a special one-time seminar and reception for UK faculty, staff and students.

 

Their presentation, titled "A Half Century Love Affair With An Old Vitamin: Inspiration for Emerging Therapies," will cover the Jacobsons' 50-year partnership in work and life. Both were members of the UK Markey Cancer Center and UK health colleges — Mike with the UK College of Pharmacy and Elaine with the UK College of Health Sciences.

 

Their research into vitamin B3 here at UK led to considerable grant funding and the awarding of patents related to the niacin prodrug for the treatment of a variety of skin disorders. The Jacobsons formed their own company here in Lexington, Niadyne, which develops pharmaceutical and cosmeceutical products. Royalties from sales of these products are now being used to support research into the next big idea at the University.

 

The seminar begins Thursday at 2 p.m. in 152 BioPharm Complex. A reception will immediately follow at 3 p.m. in the atrium, where attendees will have the opportunity to meet the Jacobsons and ask questions. Registration is not required for this event. 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

Alternative Splicing of RNA Shows Potential as Drug Target for Obesity, Cancer

Fri, 09/30/2016 - 13:07

 

Video produced by UK Reveal. 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 3, 2016) – University of Kentucky College of Medicine Professor Stefan Stamm has identified a previously-unknown function of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs): regulating a fundamental cellular process called alternative splicing. His findings point to new ways to treat obesity and cancer.

 

“Alternative splicing allows cells to make multiple proteins out of a single gene,” Stamm explains.

 

In alternative splicing, the molecule being spliced – a form of RNA known as precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) – is an intermediate species between the DNA template that contains the instructions to make a protein and the protein product that is ultimately generated by following those instructions. During this process, the cell’s splicing machinery cuts out segments of the pre-mRNA. It then splices the remaining pieces together to create the mature mRNA that will be used to make a protein. Many pre-mRNAs can be spliced in different ways, and the disparate mRNAs that result are used to produce unique variants of the corresponding proteins.

 

But most RNAs are not used to make proteins. Among these so-called non-coding RNAs are small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), which guide certain RNA-modifying proteins to their job sites. Curiously, the absence of some snoRNAs is tied to diseases, including certain cancers and Prader-Willi syndrome, a genetic form of obesity. These links indicate that snoRNAs do more than direct RNA modification.

 

In collaboration with Professor Ruth Sperling of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Stamm’s laboratory found that some snoRNAs engage with newfound cellular partners to regulate alternative splicing. Since alternative splicing can regulate protein function, the researchers suspect that this role of snoRNAs might explain why the absence of certain snoRNAs is associated with disease.

 

If missing snoRNAs are a cause of some diseases, Stamm hypothesized, then replacing the missing snoRNAs with synthetic surrogates should be effective in treating those diseases. To test this hypothesis, Stamm collaborated with Professor Ronald Emeson of Vanderbilt University.

 

Stamm’s previous work had revealed that SNORD115, a snoRNA that is not produced in people with Prader-Willi syndrome, regulates the alternative splicing of serotonin 2C receptor’s pre-mRNA. Since this receptor is involved in controlling appetite and food consumption, Stamm’s observations suggested that alternative splicing-induced changes in its function may contribute to the drive of people with Prader-Willi syndrome to overeat. He collaborated with Emeson to determine whether a synthetic replacement for SNORD115 might be successful in treating this condition.

 

“In order to stop these patients from overeating, we looked for a way to substitute this snoRNA,” said Stamm. “We identified an oligonucleotide – a short strand of RNA – that could mimic the effect of the naturally-occurring snoRNA.”

 

When the researchers tested the oligonucleotide in animal models, they found that the group who received the oligonucleotide ate less food than did the control groups.

 

“This shows that food consumption is regulated at the level of alternative splicing,” said Stamm, “and that we can interfere with this system using an RNA oligonucleotide.”

 

While the missing snoRNA in Prader-Willi syndrome may have inspired the design of this new treatment strategy, the implications extend beyond the rare genetic disorder.

 

“What’s fascinating is that, because Prader-Willi syndrome is a genetic disease, it’s basically an exaggeration of normal obesity,” said Stamm. “From this, we can learn new ways to treat obesity in the general population.”

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

Campus Partners Host Graduate and Professional School Showcase

Fri, 09/30/2016 - 11:00

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 3, 2016) — Today from noon to 3 p.m several campus partners will host the Graduate and Professional School Showcase at Memorial Coliseum.

 

The showcase will provide students with the opportunity to meet graduate and professional school representatives from in-state and out-of-state schools. Students will also learn about admission, financial assistance and graduate exams. Applications waivers will also be offered from select schools.

 

In addition to today's showcase, several graduate and professional school preparation events will be held throughout October. Those events are as follows:

 

· Preparing for law school workshop

o 4 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3, Stuckert Career Center room 202

· Kaplan Test Prep Options (GRE, MCAT, LSAT, GMAT)

o 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 4, Stuckert Career Center room 101

· Law School Fair

o 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5, White Hall Classroom Building hallway

· Study Tips for Entering Medical School

o 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5, Stuckert Career Center room 101

o 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 18, Stuckert Career Center room 101

· Writing a Winning Personal Statement

o 4:30-5:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6, Stuckert Career Center room 101

· Graduate School 101 Workshops

o 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Stuckert Career Center room 202

· Kaplan FREE Practice Test for MCAT and LSAT

o 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, White Hall Classroom Building

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, visit uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398, blair.hoover@uky.edu

Environmental Change Drove Diversity in Lake Malawi Cichlids

Fri, 09/30/2016 - 10:47

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 4, 2016) — Africa’s Lake Malawi is home to hundreds of species of cichlids, the freshwater fish whose broad array of colors make them popular denizens of household aquariums. A new study, led by a Brown University researcher and co-authored by Michael McGlue, Pioneer Professor of Stratigraphy in the University of Kentucky Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, shows how dramatic environmental changes during the lake’s history likely drove that dazzling evolutionary diversity.

 

The study found that for the last 800,000 years, phases of deep and clear water in Lake Malawi have alternated with phases of shallow and murky water. The timing of the longest-lasting deep phases coincides with explosions of cichlid diversity that have occurred throughout the lake’s history.

 

“The timing of persistent deep water phases is consistent with what evolutionary biologists have suggested as periods of rapid diversification in cichlid species,” said Sarah Ivory, a postdoctoral researcher at Brown University and the study’s lead author. “We think the deep phases created new shoreline habitats for fish to adapt into, as well as the right conditions for assortative mating, both of which could drive species diversity.”

 

The study was led by Ivory, and was co-authored by McGlue and researchers from the University of Arizona, the University of Rhode Island, and the BP Corporation. It was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

 

Lake Malawi stretches for about 350 miles in a narrow basin bordering Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania in Eastern Africa. The diversity of the lake’s cichlids, like Darwin’s Galapagos finches, is a classic example of “adaptive radiation" — the rapid diversification of species as they adapt to environmental niches.

 

“Cichlids are a great model system for looking at this evolutionary process,” said Ivory, an environmental scientist in the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society. “There are around 800 species in the lake, so it’s a perfect laboratory for exploring how diversity develops.”

 

Evolutionary biologists have sequenced the genomes of several cichlid species. Using a “molecular clock” technique, biologists can shed light on when species diverged in time. That work has suggested that the Lake Malawi cichlids have diversified in fits and starts, with several distinct bursts of diversification beginning about 750,000 years ago.

 

This new research puts that evolutionary history in ecological context.

 

Using sediment cores harvested from the lake floor, Ivory and her colleagues assembled an environmental history of the lake spanning the past 1.2 million years. The sediment cores contain fossilized aquatic animals and pollen from plants, as well as important mineralogical information. Changes in the fossil assemblages and mineral indicators in the cores give clues about how environmental conditions — the lake’s water level, salinity and other attributes — change through time.

 

The research showed that between 1.2 million and 800,000 years ago, Lake Malawi was consistently shallow and marshy. But at around 800,000 years ago, things changed dramatically. The lake deepened to near its current 700-meter depth, and its waters became much more sensitive to large climate fluctuations. The researchers believe this shift was likely driven by a tectonic event that closed off the lake’s river outlet, allowing the basin to fill up.

 

Following that tectonic shift, the lake’s environment became much less stable. The study found that over the last 800,000 years, the lake has alternated between “blue phases” marked by deep, clear water and “green phases” marked by shallow, algae-filled water. The evidence suggests that there were extended blue phases — each lasting around 100,000 years — that occurred 800,000 and 400,000 years ago, along with one starting 70,000 years ago that persists today. Between those extended blue phases, the lake rapidly alternated between green and blue phases roughly every 20,000 years.

 

The timing of the extended blue phases lines up nicely with the molecular clock data, which suggests diversification events around 750,000; 400,000; and 70,000 years ago. Taken together, the results suggest that the blue phases created the right conditions for diversification.

 

Deepening water would have created new rocky shoreline habitats to which species may become adapted, Ivory says. The clear water also could have allowed fish to use visual cues when choosing a mate, which could drive the evolution of color patterns in cichlid species. During the green phases, in contrast, lakebed habitats would be flat and sandy, lacking rocky niche environments. The murky water would limit the use of visual cues in mating.

 

“The turbidity of the water and the lack of diverse environments during the green phases lends itself to hybridization rather than diversification,” Ivory said. “We would also expect extinction events during these periods.”

 

But that doesn’t mean the green phases are evolutionarily unimportant. The researchers suggest that interbreeding during green phases might have given rise to new hybrid traits, which were then subject to selection during the blue phases. In that way, the green phases would be “critical for ‘priming the pump’ of diversity,” the researchers say.

 

Ivory says that prior research had found a link between the most recent diversification event and the onset of the current blue phase about 70,000 years ago. But this is the first time researchers have shown that the pattern was repeated several times in the lake’s history.

 

“The repetition of this pattern was really interesting to see,” she said. “Linking the evolutionary processes to the environmental change through time is really important for understanding the diversity in cichlids that we see today.”

 

Ivory's co-authors on the paper were Margaret W. Blome (BP), John King (University of Rhode Island), Michael M. McGlue (University of Kentucky), Julie Cole and Andrew S. Cohen (University of Arizona). The research was funded by the National Science Foundation's Earth System History Program (EAR-0602350), the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program, the American Chemical Society (#54376-DNI8), and the Smithsonian Institution.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

UK MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu 

 

Sanders-Brown Research Hints at Underlying Cause for Alzheimer's Drug Trial Failures

Fri, 09/30/2016 - 10:22

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 3, 2016) –  Because Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia, many people use the two terms interchangeably. But inadequate blood flow to the brain due to microinfarcts, mini-strokes, or strokes is a hallmark of a disease called Vascular Cognitive Impairment and Dementia (VCID). VCID is the second most common cause of dementia, and the two are not mutually exclusive – researchers estimate that 40-60% of Alzheimer’s disease patients also have VCID.

 

A paper recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience by Donna Wilcock, PhD, of the University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, reports that a certain form of immunotherapy targeted to Alzheimer's patients may be ineffective when that patient also has VCID.

 

"These findings are important in that they provide a possible explanation for why clinical trials of anti-Aβ immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s disease have been historically unsuccessful," Wilcock said.  "If up to 40 percent of people with Alzheimer's also have VCID, treatment candidates that target only the AD physiology won't be effective in those patients.  It's like treating only half the disease."

 

Most researchers agree that the formation of brain plaques containing amyloid β (Aβ) peptides is an initial step in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, which has led to a race to identify and test treatments that reduce the levels of these plaques. Anti-Aβ immunotherapy, which uses antibodies against A to clear it from the brain, has been a leading approach.

 

While these drugs showed promise in animal studies, clinical trials have failed to show similar benefits in human patients.

 

"There has been one failure after another in clinical trials, which has been really disheartening for the scientific community and for patients, Wilcock said. "My work might shed some early light on why they failed and eventually open the door for a combination treatment for VCID and AD."

 

Without a suitable animal model, testing this hypothesis would not have been possible. Fortunately, Wilcock and her research team had already developed an innovative model of combined AD and VCID. Using this mouse model, together with its parent model of AD without VCID, Wilcock evaluated the ability of an anti-Aβ antibody to enhance cognitive capabilities in both models. While Aβ levels were reduced in both groups, cognitive function was not improved in the groups with combined AD and VCID.

 

"The failure of anti-Aβ immunotherapy in the mixed AD-VCID model suggests that both disease processes have to be treated to have a successful outcome," Wilcock said. "The missing link has been that our animal models usually possess the hallmarks of only one disease, which has led to failure of successful translation to clinic."

 

By developing a model that more accurately reflects the brain changes we see in the human brain with dementia, we can better develop our treatment approaches and increase our chances of successful translation. Our next step is to add a treatment for VCID on top of the Aβ immunotherapy to try to overcome the inability to produce a meaningful improvement in learning and memory."

 

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health under award numbers F31NS092202 and 1RO1NS079637.  This content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact:  Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

 

 

UK Dentistry Celebrates National Dental Hygiene Month

Fri, 09/30/2016 - 08:21

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 3, 2016) – In celebration of National Dental Hygiene Month, UK Dentistry is reminding everyone that good oral health goes a long way in supporting overall wellbeing. To assist in ensuring people are using the best tools to achieve a healthy smile, on Tuesdays during the month of October, UK Dentistry will be offering free dental goodies, while supplies last. Additional details are available at https://goo.gl/FeP1Rf.

 

Surveys in the U.S. have revealed not all adults are brushing and flossing daily, and many are skipping regular visits to the dentist. Instead of brushing twice a day for two minutes each time, a survey by Delta Dental reported 23 percent of Americans went two or more days without brushing during a one-year period. Only four out of 10 reported flossing daily, as recommended, while 20 percent reported never flossing.

 

“Although awareness is growing, many people still don’t realize just how important their oral health is in relation to their overall health,” said Dr. Kenneth Nusbacher, director of UK Dentistry General Faculty Practice Clinic. “Daily good dental hygiene helps keep the bacteria, which is naturally present in the mouth, from reaching dangerous levels and potentially triggering heath concerns beyond the mouth. Good dental hygiene is not just about avoiding a cavity.”

 

UK Dentistry encourages the adoption of a healthy dental hygiene routine. Cleaning your teeth, gums, and tongue daily, paired with visiting a dental provider regularly, can greatly reduce your risk of issues such as tooth decay and gum disease.

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Olivia McCoy, olivia.mccoy1@uky.edu, (859) 257-1076

 

 

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