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Conference to Highlight Changes in the Neurology and Neurosurgery Fields

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 16:41

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2016) — The University of Kentucky College of Medicine Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery and the Kentucky Neuroscience Institute will host an accredited event to bring health care providers up to date on care practices dealing with neurology and neurosurgery.

 

On April 29, health care providers who treat patients with neurological issues from primary care physicians to occupational and physical therapists are invited to join the Practical Update in Neurology and Neursurgery — several forums discussing new evidence-based practices in neurology. Presentations will cover advances in medical management for headache, memory complaints, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy and acute ischemic stroke.

 

The event is free, but participants must register through CE Central before April 11 to reserve a spot. Onsite registration and breakfast will start the day at 8 a.m. in the Pavilion A auditorium of the U.K. Albert B. Chandler Hospital with the welcome and introduction beginning at 9:30 a.m. The event ends at 4 p.m. Participants attending this event will receive free validated parking in the hospital parking garage at the corner of South Limestone and Leader Avenue

 

To register visit http://www.cecentral.com/live/11652

 

For questions regarding this event please call 859-218-5074 or email ukneuroeducation@uky.edu

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

UK Percussion Group Showcases University Composing Talents in Concert

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 16:30

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Percussion Group (UKPG), a smaller chamber group known for performing cutting-edge percussion literature written for smaller forces, will perform a free concert at 7:30 p.m. tonight (Thursday), March 10, at the Singletary Center for the Arts Recital Hall.

 

The upcoming UKPG concert will feature five extremely musical and physically demanding works for the performers. The program begins with Ivan Trevino's "Catching Shadows," originally written for a marimba duet. The opening will be followed by a premier performance of "The Koala Superdeep Borehole" by C. Snow (Connor Shafran), a UK music and German studies senior from Richmond, Kentucky. The concert will continue with "Volcán de Fuego" by UK doctoral student Francisco Perez, "Mallet Quartet" by Steve Reich and Ryan George's "Consider the Birds," which uses musical "murmurations" built around evolving figures. In addition to UKPG performing work by Perez, he will also serve as a featured conductor for the concert. Perez is a native of Pflugerville, Texas.

 

Chamber percussion performance is a specialized field, and requires a number of skills not normally required for the performance of symphonic or solo music. The percussionists of UKPG develop a close intimacy of shared musical experience, moving into a zone that is not often experienced when a conductor is leading them. They make on-the-spot musical decisions and perform spontaneous gestures, which turns the music into a conversation between the performers.

 

Members of UKPG are drawn from the UK Percussion Ensemble, conducted by James Campbell. The ensemble is nationally recognized for its excellence and innovative programming.

 

For more information on the UK Percussion Group concert, contact James Campbell, director of Percussion Studies at UK School of Music, at 859-257-8187.

 

UKPG is one of several ensembles housed at the UK School of Music in the UK College of Fine Arts. The school has garnered national recognition for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, theory and music history.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Thro Elected to Board of National Organization

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 15:06

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016) — University of Kentucky General Counsel William E. Thro has been elected to a three-year term on the Board of Trustees of the National Education Finance Academy, formerly named the National Education Finance Conference. 

 

Based at the University of Cincinnati, the mission of the National Education Finance Academy is "to provide a forum truly focused on school finance to enhance education for both young and adult learners. The conference provides a venue for collaboration among legislators, postsecondary education, school district and state agency personnel, professional organizations, and researchers concerned with the importance of equity, adequacy, and efficiency concepts that affect state, local, and federal revenue generation, distribution, and expenditures."

 

Thro has written extensively on constitutional issues in educational contexts with a particular emphasis on school finance litigation. His scholarly work has been recognized with Stetson University's Kaplin Award for Excellence in Higher Education Law and Policy Scholarship, the National Education Finance Conference’s Distinguished Research Fellow Award, and the National Association of College and University Attorneys’ Fellow Award.

 

A former solicitor general of Virginia, Thro has a distinguished record of service to academic, professional and civic organizations including serving as president of the Education Law Association, chair of the Virginia Bar Association’s Appellate Practice Section, board chair for a local Red Cross Chapter, and editorial board chair for the Journal of College and University Law, to name a few. He joined UK's Office of Legal Counsel in 2012.

 

In addition to being elected to the National Education Finance Academy's Board of Trustees, Thro also presented on recent developments in school finance litigation during the organization's sixth annual conference Feb. 10-12 in Jacksonville, Florida.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Kathy Johnson, 859-257-3155, kathy.johnson@uky.edu

First Major Touring Exhibit of Contemporary Emirati Art Makes Final Stop at UK's Bolivar Gallery

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 14:57

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016)"Past Forward: Contemporary Art from the Emirates," the first major touring exhibition of Emirati art, is opening at the University of Kentucky’s Bolivar Art Gallery on April 16. The exhibition, organized by Meridian International Center and the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), tells the story of the UAE’s rich history, culture and rapid development. The exhibition will be on display in Kentucky — the final stop in the exhibition’s 18-month national tour — through May 13.

 

A special highlight of "Past Forward" is the display of works that showcase facets of Emirati culture, including a strong equestrian heritage and a culture deeply rooted in hospitality. Similar to Lexington, horses are intrinsically woven into the fabric of Emirati culture. The UAE is home to some of the world’s most famous horse racing tournaments including the Dubai World Cup, and the country’s founding father, Sheikh Zayed, led the country in promoting purebred Arabian horses to the world. The UAE — which is home to more than 200 different nationalities — and Kentucky share a proud culture of hospitality that makes visitors feel at home.

 

"'Past Forward’ presents the UAE’s culture and history as told through the eyes of the country’s best contemporary artists, and how the country has preserved its traditions while developing into the modern, open and tolerant place it is today," said UAE Ambassador to the United States Yousef Al Otaiba. "'Past Forward’s final stop in Lexington, Kentucky, is the last chance to view some of these talented Emiratis’ artwork in the U.S., and we are excited to share this moment in a city where we have so much in common."

 

The UAE and the U.S. share close bilateral ties, and the "Past Forward" touring exhibition and auxiliary programming is a reflection of the two countries’ friendship. During the week leading up to the exhibition’s opening in Lexington, a delegation of featured artists from the UAE will participate in public programming and arts outreach on the University of Kentucky campus and around the community.

 

The exhibition showcases over 50 paintings, photographs, sculptures, video installations and other media by 25 notable Emirati artists that emphasize core elements of life in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Emirati artists are a multifaceted group of men and women who have maintained a sense of national identity while also promoting their vision and aspirations for the future. Early proponents of contemporary art in the UAE forged a path for the art world over 40 years ago, making the discipline a key aspect of today’s culture.

 

"We are thrilled to host this incredibly important exhibit. It is a tremendous vote of confidence by the UAE to enable the School of Art and Visual Studies to showcase more than 25 leading Emirati artists,” said University of Kentucky College of Fine Arts Dean Michael Tick. "The scope of this exhibit not only allows us to strengthen our programming for the benefit of the students of the University of Kentucky as well as the entire community, but also showcase our new state-of-art building."

 

"Past Forward" showcases works by several of these pioneers, who draw inspiration from the country’s rich history, diverse society and unique environment. Immersed in a fast-moving, transitional space, Emirati artists still remain deeply connected to their roots. "Past Forward" leads visitors on a visual journey from artistic beginnings in the United Arab Emirates to the country’s evolution into a vibrant regional art center. It also provides an intimate view of life in the UAE that characterizes the nation’s past, present and future.

 

"'Past Forward’ will provide a unique opportunity for people in Lexington to learn about the UAE’s cultural heritage through the eyes of Emirati artists," said Meridian International Center President and CEO Ambassador Stuart Holliday.

 

"Past Forward: Contemporary Art from the Emirates" is organized and circulated by Meridian International Center with support from the Embassy of the United Arab Emirates in Washington, D.C. Additional support for "Past Forward" is provided by the Abu Dhabi Tourism and Culture Authority, the Salama Bint Hamdan Al Nahyan Foundation and Etihad Airways. The exhibition is co-curated by the Meridian Center for Cultural Diplomacy and contemporary Emirati art expert Noor Al Suwaidi. As part of its national tour, the exhibition has visited Fort Worth and Dallas, Texas; Los Angeles, California; Spokane, Washington; East Lansing, Michigan; and Chicago, Illinois.

 

About the Bolivar Art Gallery

Housed in the University of Kentucky Art and Visual Studies Building, the Bolivar Art Gallery is the primary gallery space of the UK School of Art and Visual Studies at the UK College of Fine Arts. The gallery features exhibition programming showcasing work by visiting artists, as well as UK students and faculty in the School of Art and Visual Studies, an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design that offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of art studioart history and visual studies, and art education.

 

About Meridian International Center 

Headquartered in Washington, D.C., Meridian International Center is a premier international leadership organization that provides valuable insight and experiences across borders, cultures and sectors. Meridian works with U.S. Department of State partners in the government, private, NGO, and educational sectors globally to create lasting international partnerships through leadership programs and cultural exchanges. Meridian also connects U.S. and foreign governments with the private sector to respond to global challenges and sustain impact. Meridian’s mission is to create innovative exchange, educational, cultural, and policy programs that advance three goals: strengthen U.S. engagement with the world through the power of exchange, prepare public and private sector leaders for a complex global future, and provide a neutral forum for international collaboration across sectors.

 

About The United Arab Emirates

The UAE is a source of stability, tolerance, innovation, and growth in the Arabian Gulf and around the globe. The United States and the UAE are reliable allies, with historical and present-day shared security and economic interests. In fact, the UAE is the largest export market for U.S. goods in the Middle East and more U.S. naval vessels visit UAE ports than any other port outside the United States. The United States and the UAE also enjoy growing social and cultural ties, and many U.S. institutions in education, health care and the arts have formed collaborative partnerships with UAE entities. For more information: www.uae-embassy.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Quick Response by Co-Workers, Gill Heart Team Saves Lexington Man From "Widowmaker"

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 14:20

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016) — Regardless of the outcome, the Southeastern Conference Tournament will be infinitely more memorable for Tim Hayden this year.

 

That's because he doesn't remember any of last year's tournament.

 

On March 13, 2015, just before the Kentucky-Florida tip-off, Tim had a heart attack during a meeting at work. Fewer than half of all patients survive the type of heart attack Tim had — ominously called a "widow-maker" — where the left anterior descending coronary artery becomes completely blocked. But the quick actions of his co-workers, emergency personnel, and physicians at the University of Kentucky Gill Heart Institute were factors in Tim's complete return to health.

 

 

Tim is famous among his co-workers at Southern Wine and Spirits (SWS) for hating meetings and loving UK basketball.

 

"I mean he loves it, he lives and breathes it," said Harold Nikirk, Southern Wine and Spirits' field sales manager and Tim's boss, But SWS Brand Director Greg Wilson was coming in from Louisville that day, and so Harold had no choice but to call the meeting and hope it would be finished by tipoff.

 

The small conference room was crowded with seven people, and two more sales people had called in from out of state. According to Harold, Tim "was his normal self, laughing and cutting up." But as Harold began to speak, Tim started snoring.

 

"At least I thought it was snoring," said Harold.  "I though he was trying to make a funny editorial comment about having a meeting."

 

But Tim didn't stop making the snoring noise. 

 

"Tim went rigid and turned a frightening shade of purple," said Erin White, a co-worker of Tim's. "It was chaos, everyone started shouting at once."

 

Susan Logan, an administrative assistant with nursing training, ran to the room where she locked eyes with Erin over Tim's prone body. Susan said, "We have to do this. Do you want breaths or compressions?" They immediately began CPR.

 

"That was probably the longest two minutes of my life, hovering over Tim and pushing," Erin said.  "We were pleading for Tim to stay with us and just could not press hard enough."

 

According to Harold, the office became choreography with everyone pitching in to help in some way. One person called 911, others ran to the street corner to wave the ambulance in, others moved cars from the parking spots closest to the door and furniture out of the way so that the paramedics had easy access.

 

Fortunately for Tim, his workplace had an AED, or automatic external defibrillator.  An AED is a portable device that checks heart rhythm and can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm if needed. Anyone with basic training can use an AED, which makes it possible for more people to respond to a situation where sudden cardiac death is suspected. And Greg, a Boy Scout leader, had that training.

 

The AED administered one shock and advised to continue CPR until paramedics arrived.

 

"The paramedics had to peel us off of Tim because we didn't want to stop," said Susan.  "The whole time I was thinking that just two months previous I had run into Tim and his family at the movies, so I kept thinking 'please help me get him to his family, he's got two little boys, please.'"

 

As Harold climbed into the ambulance with Tim, Erin told paramedics to take him to UK. "Catherine (Tim's wife) works at UK and I knew they had a heart institute, so that seemed the best place to take him," she said.

 

"All the way to the hospital, Tim's making that snoring noise, all the way, even when they're taking him off the truck, even when they're wheeling him down, he never stopped," said Harold.  "I'll never, ever, get that noise out of my mind."

 

Waiting for him there was Dr. Adrian Messerli, director of the heart catheterization laboratory at the UK Gill Heart Institute.

 

"With a heart attack, especially one like Tim's, every minute literally counts," he said.  "We were the first hospital in Lexington to allow paramedics to bypass the emergency room and go directly to the cath lab, which buys us precious time and hugely increases the patient's chances for survival." 

 

Messerli restored blood flow by inserting two stents in the artery running down the front wall of Tim's heart, propping the blocked artery open.  He then put Tim in a type of medically induced coma called targeted therapeutic hypothermia, where a patient's core body temperature is cooled temporarily. 

 

"When the heart arrests, it's not just the heart that sustains damage, but all the vital organs, specifically the brain, because they all have inadequate blood flow during the arrest," Messerli said. "It's thought that this protocol protects the vital organs from damage and improves healing."

 

For Tim, it worked beautifully.

 

"What's so gratifying about Tim's case is that the healing has really been complete and absolute," he said.  "When I see him in the office, he's in wonderful spirits, minimal complaints, and he's doing really well."

 

Tim spent three weeks in the hospital, which were especially long and worrisome for Susan and Erin.

 

"I'll never forget the day we got the text from Tim's wife Catherine saying 'Tim is out of here tomorrow.' It was like the sky just opened up and the world was whole again," Susan said. She texted Erin with three words: "We Did It!"

 

Since then, about a dozen of SWS's 40 staffers have received CPR certification and AED training. The Lexington Fire Department honored the group at their annual banquet this year for their bravery, quick thinking, and knowledge of CPR. They also joined #TimsTeam at the American Heart Association's 2015 Heart Walk, raising more than $3,500, which included a large donation from SWS in Tim's honor.

 

"We are a family at SWS," said Erin.  "We came with our spouses and our children, and it was really cool just to show the importance in that day."

 

And, Susan adds with a laugh, "They don't know it, but we're about to ask again."

 

Messerli says that Tim's meeting on that day most likely saved his life.

 

"Dr. Messerli told us if Tim had been at home, or if the meeting had been scheduled later, or if he'd been in his car, this type of heart attack isn't something that people typically survive," Harold said.

 

"I think Tim was fortunate for many reasons," Messerli said. "He was surrounded by coworkers who knew how to perform CPR and knew how to use an AED. Those critical first steps sustained Tim until we could get him he treatment he needed."

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact: Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu

 

UK Chief Information Security Officer Warns Against Phishing Email Scams Aimed at Stealing Tax Returns

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 13:52

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016) — Expect to receive fraudulent emails this tax season, University of Kentucky Chief Information Security Officer Michael Carr cautions. 

 

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently warned consumers about email scams that are designed to steal identities and rob taxpayers of their tax refunds. The consumer alert was released after the IRS saw nearly a 400% increase in phishing and malware incidents so far this tax season and reports of scams targeting others in the tax community.

 

The emails are designed to trick taxpayers into thinking these are official communications from the IRS or others in the tax industry, including tax software companies. The phishing schemes may ask taxpayers about a wide range of topics. Emails can seek information related to refunds, filing status, confirming personal information, ordering transcripts and verifying PIN information.

 

What to do if you have replied to a phishing email that was sent to your UK email address:

  • Change your link blue password immediately via the UK Account Manager at http;//password.uky.edu.
  • Call UK Analytics and Technologies (UKAT) Customer Service at 859-218-HELP (4357) if you need additional assistance changing your password.

How to detect a potential scam:

  • An email that appears to be from the IRS (the IRS does NOT send emails).
  • Poor English syntax and/or grammar within the message.
  • An unspecified sender or links that ask you to click on any address (a uky.edu or a non-uky.edu address) or any website URL for "secure verification."
  • A fake reply address e.g., chancellor@uky.edu (UK does not have a chancellor).
  • An email that contains a threat or sense of urgency if action is not taken immediately

If you are in doubt about the validity of an email message, please contact UKAT Customer Service at 859-218-HELP (4357).

 

Steps you can take to protect yourself from identity thieves:

  • Always use security software with firewall and anti-virus protections. Make sure the security software is always turned on and can automatically update itself. Encrypt sensitive files such as tax records you store on your computer.  
  • Use strong passwords.
  • Learn to recognize and avoid phishing emails, threatening calls and texts from thieves posing as legitimate organizations such as your bank, credit card company and even the IRS. Do not click on links or download attachments from unknown or suspicious emails.
  • Protect your personal data. Don’t routinely carry your social security card and make sure your tax records are secure. Treat your personal information like you do your cash; don’t leave it lying around.

Visit www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p4524.pdf for additional steps.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Sounds of Support

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 11:24

 

 

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2015) — From an early age, Hannah Ellis loved to make a joyful noise.

 

"As far as my musical background, I guess you could say that I‘ve been singing before I was talking," Ellis said. "We have videos of me not really being able to put sentences together but I knew the words to 'Amazing Grace.' My parents were both singers and it came really natural to me and all my siblings to start singing as soon as we were able to make noise."

 

Another noise she liked to make growing up — cheering for the University of Kentucky Wildcats.

 

"I grew up in a small town, Campbellsville, Kentucky, and I have been a UK fan my entire life. My parents raised us as UK fans. We were those people that when we won the NÇAA men's basketball championship when I was seven we drove an hour and a half to meet the team coming off of the plane. It’s been true fandom the whole way through. I don’t even know that I applied to another college honestly. It was just kind of a non-option for me."

 

But Ellis did have another option — to go to Nashville to pursue her dream of becoming a recording artist.

 

"I was about to graduate high school when I had this epiphany that music was what I wanted to do with my life. At that time I had already received a full-ride scholarship to the University of Kentucky, so it was kind of this moment of ‘Do I go to college or do I just move to Nashville?’ With a little bit of coaxing from my parents because I was just 18, and knowing that going to UK was the plan all along, I went to UK and prayed that my degree and a full-time music career would go hand-in-hand in some way."

 

"It is funny to think about now, but when I first actually applied to go to UK I thought I was going to go in and take all these classes to become a sports therapist. That was my initial thinking when I applied for school and registered. Then about a semester into my freshman year, I was like ‘This does not contribute to a music career at all.'"

 

"So I decided to major in integrated strategic communication because it was something that was going to actually speak to the career path I had chosen as a musician. My major and attending UK really taught me how to market myself as a musician."

Singer-songwriter Hannah Ellis

 

After graduation in 2012, Ellis loaded up her car and left the Bluegrass State and moved to Music City — Nashville. While her heart never strayed far from her old Kentucky home, she never thought her Kentucky roots would play such a big role in her country music career.

 

"I was talking to a friend of mine about how much I love the state of Kentucky and he said ‘Oh that’s so funny my lawyer is actually a guy from Kentucky.’ I said ‘Wow, that’s crazy!’ and he’s like ‘Yeah, you actually ought to meet him because if you don’t have a lawyer that’s something you’re going to need in this career.’"

 

Ellis and Safford did meet. And just like that, the Big Blue Nation walked right back into Ellis' life in the form of UK alumnus Scott Safford.

 

"I wanted to be in the music industry since before I attended UK," Safford, a 1995 College of Arts and Sciences and 1997 College of Law graduate, said. "The fun part of my job is helping people like Hannah navigate the music industry, which can be complex and scary for people new to the business."

 

"When you find out that somebody else graduated from UK, you want to work with them," Ellis said. "From the very first time I met Scott, we sat around and talked about Keeneland and our hometowns and the University of Kentucky campus and different things that we had in common because we had kind of walked on that same path. It was really great for us to bond over that from the very beginning and we were like ‘Ok this relationship is special, it’s something going to have a huge bearing on our life.’ It’s just been a really awesome thing to go on this journey with somebody that knows where I came from and what I experienced."

 

"Here in Nashville, it's like UK south," Safford said. "There are so many UK alums in town and we support each other and a lot of us are honestly just friends. It's not because 'Hey you went to UK, therefore I'm going to support you.' It's we have known each other for a long time but still there's that sense of community amongst UK alums here. Anytime there is an event on television or an important game, at any number of places in town there will be a gathering of UK alums and that's kind of unique and special to us."

Scott Safford

 

"As a matter of fact, the very first person I met in the music business was a UK alum. She was instrumental in helping me grow relationships and meet people in the business, which ultimately led to the job I have today. It helps so much to have one person who can kind of bring you into a family, and it was great that I found somebody with whom I had a common connection to UK when I first started in this industry. It's been fun to pass that along to Hannah as part of our interaction and to bring her along as the next generation. UK, that pride and passion, transcends generations here. I think what makes us different at UK is the passion with which we support the university and each other. It's that passion and the relationships that go along with it that makes us special."

 

"Being able to be in another state in another city and to meet someone that shares your love of the University of Kentucky is very special," Ellis said. "It kind of feels like a little piece of home away from home, so to speak. You don’t have family in town with you, but you do have someone that gets it. They get why you get crazy in the month of March, and they get why your closet is over three-fourths blue. Having somebody that totally knows where you’re coming from, and just feeling like, there’s just a different level of even friendship there. Because there’s this kind of understanding that comes with it."

 

"A big part of what I do is being a champion for somebody who has come to Nashville with a dream," Safford said. "It's such a courageous step to come here and to declare 'I'm going to be a songwriter or an artist in Nashville' because the odds are astronomically stacked against you. People who fight through that and make it, I'm so proud to be a part of that process with them. But what they need are champions. It's fun for me to be a part of that story and that process."

 

"For me, being a musician is such a special job because I truly, truly believe that music moves people," Ellis said. "I honestly feel really blessed to be able to pursue something that I’m truly passionate about. And I’m finally at a point where I can say that this is my career and it’s something that is just such a blessing and such a gift to be able to pursue something that can positively impact other people. Not everyone gets to do their dream job and yet here I am. I just don’t know how I got that lucky."

 

"UK really sets you up to make your mark on the world. UK is a place that supports you as a person, you as an individual, you as whoever it is that you want to be, you as anything that you’re trying to accomplish."

 

###

 

Before the Wildcats take the court in this year's Southeastern Conference Tournament, Hannah Ellis will perform during the Greater Nashville UK Alumni Club SEC Tournament Pep Rally on Friday, March 11. The event, which takes place at the WIldhorse Saloon, runs from 2 – 5 p.m. (CDT). For more information, visit the UK Alumni Association website.

  

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett, katy.bennett@uky.edu, 859-257-1909

 

VIDEO CONTACTS: Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu; or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu 

 

UK's Stuckert Career Center to Host Kentucky Teachers Network Fair

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 10:51

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016) — Education majors, recent graduates and teachers from Kentucky and surrounding states will have the opportunity to network with representatives and recruiters at the Kentucky Teachers Network (KTN) Career Fair, hosted by the University of Kentucky’s James W. Stuckert Career Center, March 22, at the Fayette County Cooperative Extension Office. 

 

This is the 35th year for the KTN Career Fair. Nearly 60 school districts from Kentucky and surrounding states have registered for this one-day event and seek to hire upcoming graduates and alumni.

 

"We highly encourage those students who are completing their education certifications as well as those who are already working in education to attend," said Reba Carroll, senior assistant director at the UK Stuckert Career Center..

 

UK's Career Center will host the event in collaboration with the Eastern Kentucky University, Morehead State University, Georgetown College and Kentucky State University from 3:30-6 p.m. Tuesday, March 22. The fair will be held at the Fayette County Cooperative Extension Office, located at 1140 Red Mile Place off of Red Mile Road, in Lexington.

 

The KTN Career Fair is free to all job seekers. Participants are encouraged to dress professionally and to bring at least 20 copies of their résumés. Parking is limited at the Fayette County Cooperative Extension Office. Car-pooling, if possible, is suggested. A complete list of those recruiters attending the career fair can be found at: www.uky.edu/careercenter/KTN_Fair

 

As part of the UK Division of Undergraduate Education, the James W. Stuckert Career Center mission is to prepare students to successfully connect with employers and post-graduate educational opportunities. The Stuckert Career Center is here to help students connect their passions with purpose by exploring their college major options and career goals, engage in the process of expanding their knowledge and experience of the work place, and to connect with those who can help students on their career path. For more information on the Stuckert Career Center and how the staff can provide assistance, visit www.uky.edu/careercenter.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Office of LGBTQ* Resources Offers First Annual Scholarship

Wed, 03/09/2016 - 09:59

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Office of LGBTQ* Resources is offering its first annual scholarships to currently enrolled full-time students. There are multiple $1,000 awards for the 2016-2017 school year. Applications will be accepted until 5 p.m. Thursday, March 31, 2016.

 

This award was created to help ease the cost of tuition, room and board, books, education abroad, and other expenses related to the recipient’s academic journey at the university. The scholarship is available because of gifts to the UK LGBTQ* Endowment Scholarship Fund.

 

The fund was originally created by Keisa and Amanda Fallin-Bennett, two generous alumnae devoted to encouraging student success. The scholarship seeks to support UK students who are committed to earning a degree from the university. 

 

“This scholarship represents a significant new opportunity for our students that continues to raise the profile of some of the important diversity and inclusion work that is happening on campus,” said Lance Poston, director of UK LGBTQ* Resources. “These endowed scholarships also show the power of alumni engagement and generosity in promoting the success of new generations of Wildcats.”

 

To apply for this scholarship opportunity, students should complete and turn in the application to Blazer Hall room 302; electronic applications will not be accepted. Students should also supply two letters of recommendations, documentation of financial need in the form of FAFSA, and an essay explaining connections between a student’s identities and their goals at the university.

 

All full-time students are welcome to compete for this scholarship, including individuals who are a part of the LGBTQ* community and those who are not. Award decisions will be announced in late April.

 

For additional information on these scholarships and to access the application packet, click here.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

May Lecture Series Ends with Photographer of Nuclear Arsenals

Tue, 03/08/2016 - 17:17

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2016) — The work of Paul Shambroom, who is known for exploring nuclear weapons, political meetings and even lost pets in his photography, is the subject of the final presentation of the 2015-16 Robert C. May Photography Lecture Series, organized by the University of Kentucky Art Museum. The program begins 4 p.m. Friday, March 11, in the Singletary Center for the Arts. The exhibition is presented in conjunction with the artist's exhibition "Lost," a series of photographs derived from missing pet posters placed by owners in public places, on display through May 22, at the museum. Both the lecture and exhibition are free and open to the public.

 

Shambroom has frequently focused on issues that are integral parts of our lives but are difficult to examine, such as the manifestation of power in American culture. He spent two years gaining permission to photograph the country’s nuclear arsenals and as many attending small-town municipal meetings photographing elected officials enacting democracy at a grassroots level.

 

Shambroom's photographs have been exhibited widely and are part of many prestigious collections, including those at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Minneapolis' Walker Art Center and Atlanta's High Museum of Art. His work has also been published in three monographs: "Paul Shambroom: Picturing Power," "Face to Face with the Bomb: Nuclear Reality After the Cold War" and "Meetings." Shambroom has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Creative Capital Foundation, among others. He is currently on the faculty of the Department of Art at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

 

The mission of the UK Art Museum, part of the UK College of Fine Arts, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of art to enhance the quality of life for people of Kentucky through collecting, exhibiting, preserving and interpreting outstanding works of visual art from all cultures. Home to a collection of more than 4,800 objects including American and European paintings, drawings, photographs, prints and sculpture, the museum presents both special exhibitions and shows of work from its permanent collection.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Freshman Neuroscience Major Excels in UK Forensics

Tue, 03/08/2016 - 17:16

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2016) — Public speaking can be a daunting task. While some students cringe at the idea of standing up in front of their peers and presenting their ideas, others see it as a thrilling and challenging opportunity. For Veronica Scott, a University of Kentucky freshman neuroscience major in the College of Arts and Sciences and a member of the UK Forensics team, public speaking is a passion.

 

The UK Forensics team, a student organization within the School of Information Science of the UK College of Communication and Information, competes in speech and debate events in local, state and national tournaments throughout the academic year. The goal of college forensics is to provide a platform for students to learn how to communicate ideas, opinions and feelings in a meaningful and impactful way.

 

"We are all incredibly connected, and the worst thing in the world would be to impact each other without ever communicating with each other. That's why forensics is important." Scott said. "I am grateful to forensics because it gives me a platform to explore ideas."

 

Scott, daughter of Robert and Suzanne Scott from Franklin, Tennessee, dabbled in forensics in high school and quickly fell in love with it after her first tournament.

 

"The fact that the university had a forensics team that did parliamentary debate and speech events was a huge pull for me to come to UK," Scott said.

 

Although only a freshman, Scott has already achieved a lot in her short time on the team. During this year's Kentucky Forensic Association state championship tournament, Scott took tournament champion in persuasive speaking, champion in the radio broadcasting tournament and third place finisher in parliamentary debate, earning the title of Top Novice in all three events. Her 10-minute speech on how Western ideologies prevent a proper understanding of pain earned her the tournament championship in persuasive speaking, making Scott the first UK student to ever automatically qualify for the 134th Interstate Oratorical Association national tournament. The Interstate Oratory National is unique in the nation in that only two competitors from each state may qualify to attend the tournament.

 

UK Forensics earned a number of other impressive distinctions at the state championship tournament. (See below for the full results.) The team also qualified two more speeches for the National Forensic Association national tournament in April.

 

When asked about the experience, Scott said, "It's a bit surreal. I didn't go into the tournament expecting to win, but I was very passionate about my topic. We have some amazing competitors, both on the team and on the circuit, so I'm really grateful to my coach for helping me turn a really broad, philosophical topic into a speech that could win." 

 

Scott's favorite debate style, parliamentary debate, is modeled after the British Parliament and gives the speaker only 15 minutes to prepare a side for the topic. She mentions that on tournament day, "papers are everywhere, people are everywhere, and ideas are everywhere — often from early morning to late at night."

 

As a neuroscience major, Scott hopes to incorporate her public speaking skills into her future career.

 

"I want to use brain mapping to work with neurosurgeons and with gifted/disabled children. I would also love to use those same sciences to innovate strategies and systems that could improve the education system I'm so intrigued by," she said. Her public speaking skills and her love of travel could perhaps one day lead her to speaking on brain-mapping technology in seminars around the world.

 

Students interested in joining the team or learning more, should contact Director of Forensics Timothy Bill at timothy.bill@uky.edu.

 

The UK Forensics team’s next competition will be the Pi Kappa Delta National Tournament held March 16-20, at UK. 

 

Team members from UK won the following awards at the 2016 Kentucky Forensic Association state championship tournament:

 

After Dinner Speaking

4th Place – Abel Rodriguez III

Communication Analysis

6th Place – Megan Wagner

Drama Interpretation

3rd Place – Dianté Elcock

Duo Interpretation

4th Place – Rachel Brase and Megan Wagner

5th Place – Dianté Elcock and Kaylon Kennedy

6th Place – Logan Hurley and Megan Wagner

Editorial Impromptu Speaking

4th Place – Abel Rodriguez III

5th Place – Matt Karijolic

6th Place – Sam Northrup

Top Novice – Matt Karijolic

Extemporaneous Speaking

3rd Place – Abel Rodriguez III

Impromptu Speaking

Top Novice – Matt Karijolic

Informative Speaking

4th Place – Abel Rodriguez III

Top Novice – Matt Karijolic

Parliamentary Debate

1st Place – Rachel Brase and Kaylon Kennedy

2nd Place – Sam Northrup and Megan Wagner

Semifinalists – Logan Hurley and Abel Rodriguez III

Quarterfinalists – Matt Karijolic and Veronica Scott

1st Place Speaker – Rachel Brase

3rd Place Speaker – Veronica Scott

4th Place Speaker – Abel Rodriguez III

7th Place Speaker – Sam Northrup

Top Novice Speaker – Veronica Scott

Persuasive Speaking

1st Place – Veronica Scott

5th Place – Sam Northrup

Top Novice – Veronica Scott

Poetry Interpretation

4th Place – Abel Rodriguez III

Program Oral Interpretation

3rd Place – Kaylon Kennedy

5th Place – Dianté Elcock

Public Debate

Top Novice Speaker – Dianté Elcock

Radio Broadcasting

1st Place – Veronica Scott

2nd Place – Sam Northrup

4th Place – Matt Karijolic

5th Place – Dianté Elcock

Top Novice – Veronica Scott

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

 

Sounds of Support

Tue, 03/08/2016 - 16:06

 

 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2015) — From an early age, Hannah Ellis loved to make a joyful noise.

 

"As far as my musical background, I guess you could say that I‘ve been singing before I was talking," Ellis said. "We have videos of me not really being able to put sentences together but I knew the words to 'Amazing Grace.' My parents were both singers and it came really natural to me and all my siblings to start singing as soon as we were able to make noise."

 

Another noise she liked to make growing up — cheering for the University of Kentucky Wildcats.

 

"I grew up in a small town, Campbellsville, Kentucky, and I have been a UK fan my entire life. My parents raised us as UK fans. We were those people that when we won the NÇAA men's basketball championship when I was seven we drove an hour and a half to meet the team coming off of the plane. It’s been true fandom the whole way through. I don’t even know that I applied to another college honestly. It was just kind of a non-option for me."

 

But Ellis did have another option — to go to Nashville to pursue her dream of becoming a recording artist.

 

"I was about to graduate high school when I had this epiphany that music was what I wanted to do with my life. At that time I had already received a full-ride scholarship to the University of Kentucky, so it was kind of this moment of ‘Do I go to college or do I just move to Nashville?’ With a little bit of coaxing from my parents because I was just 18, and knowing that going to UK was the plan all along, I went to UK and prayed that my degree and a full-time music career would go hand-in-hand in some way."

 

"It is funny to think about now, but when I first actually applied to go to UK I thought I was going to go in and take all these classes to become a sports therapist. That was my initial thinking when I applied for school and registered. Then about a semester into my freshman year, I was like ‘This does not contribute to a music career at all.'"

 

"So I decided to major in integrated strategic communication because it was something that was going to actually speak to the career path I had chosen as a musician. My major and attending UK really taught me how to market myself as a musician."

Singer-songwriter Hannah Ellis

 

After graduation in 2012, Ellis loaded up her car and left the Bluegrass State and moved to Music City — Nashville. While her heart never strayed far from her old Kentucky home, she never thought her Kentucky roots would play such a big role in her country music career.

 

"I was talking to a friend of mine about how much I love the state of Kentucky and he said ‘Oh that’s so funny my lawyer is actually a guy from Kentucky.’ I said ‘Wow, that’s crazy!’ and he’s like ‘Yeah, you actually ought to meet him because if you don’t have a lawyer that’s something you’re going to need in this career.’"

 

Ellis and Safford did meet. And just like that, the Big Blue Nation walked right back into Ellis' life in the form of UK alumnus Scott Safford.

 

"I wanted to be in the music industry since before I attended UK," Safford, a 1995 College of Arts and Sciences and 1997 College of Law graduate, said. "The fun part of my job is helping people like Hannah navigate the music industry, which can be complex and scary for people new to the business."

 

"When you find out that somebody else graduated from UK, you want to work with them," Ellis said. "From the very first time I met Scott, we sat around and talked about Keeneland and our hometowns and the University of Kentucky campus and different things that we had in common because we had kind of walked on that same path. It was really great for us to bond over that from the very beginning and we were like ‘Ok this relationship is special, it’s something going to have a huge bearing on our life.’ It’s just been a really awesome thing to go on this journey with somebody that knows where I came from and what I experienced."

 

"Here in Nashville, it's like UK south," Safford said. "There are so many UK alums in town and we support each other and a lot of us are honestly just friends. It's not because 'Hey you went to UK, therefore I'm going to support you.' It's we have known each other for a long time but still there's that sense of community amongst UK alums here. Anytime there is an event on television or an important game, at any number of places in town there will be a gathering of UK alums and that's kind of unique and special to us."

Scott Safford

 

"As a matter of fact, the very first person I met in the music business was a UK alum. She was instrumental in helping me grow relationships and meet people in the business, which ultimately led to the job I have today. It helps so much to have one person who can kind of bring you into a family, and it was great that I found somebody with whom I had a common connection to UK when I first started in this industry. It's been fun to pass that along to Hannah as part of our interaction and to bring her along as the next generation. UK, that pride and passion, transcends generations here. I think what makes us different at UK is the passion with which we support the university and each other. It's that passion and the relationships that go along with it that makes us special."

 

"Being able to be in another state in another city and to meet someone that shares your love of the University of Kentucky is very special," Ellis said. "It kind of feels like a little piece of home away from home, so to speak. You don’t have family in town with you, but you do have someone that gets it. They get why you get crazy in the month of March, and they get why your closet is over three-fourths blue. Having somebody that totally knows where you’re coming from, and just feeling like, there’s just a different level of even friendship there. Because there’s this kind of understanding that comes with it."

 

"A big part of what I do is being a champion for somebody who has come to Nashville with a dream," Safford said. "It's such a courageous step to come here and to declare 'I'm going to be a songwriter or an artist in Nashville' because the odds are astronomically stacked against you. People who fight through that and make it, I'm so proud to be a part of that process with them. But what they need are champions. It's fun for me to be a part of that story and that process."

 

"For me, being a musician is such a special job because I truly, truly believe that music moves people," Ellis said. "I honestly feel really blessed to be able to pursue something that I’m truly passionate about. And I’m finally at a point where I can say that this is my career and it’s something that is just such a blessing and such a gift to be able to pursue something that can positively impact other people. Not everyone gets to do their dream job and yet here I am. I just don’t know how I got that lucky."

 

"UK really sets you up to make your mark on the world. UK is a place that supports you as a person, you as an individual, you as whoever it is that you want to be, you as anything that you’re trying to accomplish."

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett, katy.bennett@uky.edu, 859-257-1909

 

VIDEO CONTACTS: Amy Jones-Timoney, 859-257-2940, amy.jones2@uky.edu; or Kody Kiser, 859-257-5282, kody.kiser@uky.edu 

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: March 9, 1912

Tue, 03/08/2016 - 15:46

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 182nd diary entry from March 9, 1912, recalls a gloomy beginning to the day as McClure sees William off at the train station, she then spends the rest of her afternoon visiting with her aunt and cousins and later partakes in some refreshments from the Mountain Club reception.

 

March 9th. Go to the train with William — so sorry he's going home. In the afternoon go to Elizabeth's and spend the afternoon with Aunt Georgie and the twins. They are as cute as can be.

 

The Mountain Club girls gave a reception in the evening, but I went to sleep just the same. I waked up, however, to drink some of their delicious punch, which Edna brought in for us.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Get Involved with Sustainability at UK

Tue, 03/08/2016 - 14:39

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2016) — Deadlines are approaching to apply for two great opportunities to get involved with sustainability at the University of Kentucky next year. The Office of Sustainability is seeking applications for five paid internships and the Student Sustainability Council is seeking applications for at-large seats.

 

“Both of these opportunities provide students with exciting and hands-on experiences shaping sustainability initiatives on our campus," said UK Sustainability Coordinator Shane Tedder.

 

Student Internships:

 

The Office of Sustainability partners with the Student Sustainability Council and the Tracy Farmer Institute for Sustainability and the Environment (TFISE) to provide exciting and meaningful undergraduate internship opportunities. Each internship is tied to an existing sustainability-related program at the university (host program), including operational units such as UK Recycling and faculty working groups like the Urban Forest Initiative. All internships are paid and interns are expected to work eight to10 hours per week. Approximately half of the hours will be spent supporting the work of the host program and the other half will be focused on developing an independent student-led project.

 

The five positions for 2016-2017 are:

1.    Recycling and Waste Reduction

2.    Energy Efficiency, Conservation and Renewables

3.    Promotions and Outreach for the Office of Sustainability

4.    Urban Forest Initiative Working Group

5.    Built Environment Working Group

 

The deadline to apply is March 26, 2016. For more information about the internships, visit www.uky.edu/sustainability/student-internships.

 

Student Sustainability Council:

 

The Student Sustainability Council (SSC) is pleased to open a call for At-large Member Applications for the 2016-2017 academic year. The SSC is a registered student organization, composed of representatives from other student organizations and at-large members, and is responsible for the distribution of the Environmental Stewardship Fee (ESF). This fee generates more than $160,000 each year and the SSC distributes these funds to a wide variety of sustainability-focused projects. At-large members on the council have a vote and voice, working with student peers to ensure that the ESF is spent on programs that accurately represent the voice of the student body as well as promote sustainability on UK’s campus.

 

“The SSC is a fantastic way to gain connections with like-minded students, faculty and staff across our campus, and to become a part of a network of people working diligently to advance sustainability principles at UK and in our surrounding community," said Ellen Green, outreach director for the SSC and a junior double-majoring in environmental and sustainability studies and sustainable agriculture.

 

The deadline to apply is March 20, 2016. More information about the SSC can be found at www.uky.edu/sustainability/student-sustainability-council

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Sanders-Brown Laboratories Showcase Work on Alzheimer’s Disease, Traumatic Brain Injury

Tue, 03/08/2016 - 14:00

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2016) — The laboratories of University of Kentucky researchers Anika Hartz, Ph.D., and Christopher Norris, Ph.D., published research studying the pathologies of Alzheimer’s disease and traumatic brain injury (TBI), respectively, in the most recent issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

 

Both Alzheimer’s disease and TBI impair patients’ memory and cognitive abilities, but they have different causes. Researchers and doctors do not yet know what causes Alzheimer’s disease, but they do know the risk of developing the disease increases with age and that toxic amyloid-β proteins clump together and accumulate in the brains of patients with the disease. TBI, on the other hand, can affect individuals regardless of their age and has several known causes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the effects of TBI may be temporary or permanent, depending on the severity of head injury. Falls, assault, and vehicle collisions can all result in TBI.

 

While studying Alzheimer’s disease, the Hartz laboratory discovered that amyloid-β proteins interfere with another protein known as P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp helps clear amyloid-β from the brain, but amyloid-β in turn can prevent P-gp from doing so. This tug-of-war ultimately causes the toxic amyloid-β to accumulate faster in the brain. Hartz hopes future drug treatments could help boost P-gp activity so the brain can better clear toxic amyloid-β proteins during Alzheimer’s disease.

 

The Norris laboratory discovered high levels of a protein known as Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in brain astroglial cells.  NFAT activation appears to negate the protective functions of astroglia, causing them to become harmful during TBI. When the Norris laboratory blocked NFAT activity, they observed preservation of neuronal connectivity following brain injury in an animal model. This work suggests future drugs targeting NFAT could help patients keep or recover their cognitive function after sustaining a head injury.

 

Both Hartz and Norris are associate professors at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging.

 

"Together, Alzheimer’s disease and TBI affect several million Americans each year. Understanding how these disorders lead to brain dysfunction may ultimately allow researchers and physicians to develop new therapies to halt or reverse the damaging effects and improve quality of life," said Linda Van Eldik, Ph.D., director of the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging. "These studies, published in the most recent issue of The Journal of Neuroscience, showcase the valuable work being done by our labs to help fight brain injury and degenerative diseases."

 

The UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA) has been conducting research on Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and other age-related disease for more than 35 years. In 1985, the Center was one of the first 10 National Institutes of Health-funded Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers. Today, SBCoA is an internationally prestigious research center, identifying mechanisms for healthy brain aging and age-related diseases and exploring treatments that may slow down, cure, and/or prevent these diseases entirely.

 

The work in these studies was funded in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the Kentucky Spinal Cord and Head Injury Research trust, the PhRMA Foundation, the Irene and Eric Simon Brain Research Foundation, and the Hazel Embry Research Trust and does not necessarily reflect the views of those institutions and foundations. 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

Media Contact: Laura Dawahare, Laura.Dawahare@uky.edu, (859) 257-5307

UK Staff: Get to Know Provost Tracy at Brown Bag Lunch

Tue, 03/08/2016 - 13:09

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2016) — University of Kentucky staff are invited to get to know UK Provost Timothy Tracy at a brown bag lunch event from noon-1 p.m. Tuesday, March 15.

 

Sponsored by the UK Staff Senate, the event will take place in Room 202 of The 90, located at the corner of Hilltop and University Drive. Staff are invited to bring the lunch of their choice. Desserts and beverages will be provided.

 

Tracy became provost at UK on Feb. 23, 2015. Provost Tracy is overseeing efforts related to several pressing issues facing the university. Among others, these include:

· Strengthening UK's work in undergraduate student retention and graduation;

· Strengthening UK's graduate and professional education efforts;

· Advancing UK's research enterprise;

· Fostering with greater urgency an inclusive campus environment that celebrates the multitude of backgrounds, identities and perspectives;

· Further refining and completing UK's next Strategic Plan; and

· Implementing a new financial model.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

 

UK Earth and Environmental Sciences Professor Elected AAAS Fellow

Tue, 03/08/2016 - 08:58

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2016) — Frank R. Ettensohn, Jefferson Science Fellow, College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor, and professor of geology in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Kentucky, was one of the eight geologists and nine geographers recently elected as an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellow. The prestigious honor recognizes Ettensohn for his extraordinary achievements, dedication and commitment to science.

 

AAAS was founded in 1848, with the mission to “advance science and serve society” through initiatives in science policy, career development, international programs, science education and more. The nonprofit organization is the world’s largest general scientific society and a leading voice for science worldwide with more than 129,000 members from 91 countries. Ettensohn was named an AAAS Fellow at a ceremony held in Washington, D.C.

 

Before coming to UK in 1975, Ettensohn served as an officer in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and earned his doctoral degree in geology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has been a member, advisor or officer of the Kentucky Academy of Science's Geology Section, the Geological Society of Kentucky, the Kentucky Paleontological Society and the Kentucky Section of the American Institute of Professional Geologists (AIPG), of which he was president in 2011. That year, AIPG awarded him a Service Award, and the Kentucky section awarded him its Presidential Award. Ettensohn was also selected as the Geological Society of America representative to the North American Commission on Stratigraphic Nomenclature — a commission that oversees the naming of all rock units across North America.

 

Ettensohn's research interests center around the integration of sedimentary geology, paleontology and tectonics and are field-oriented. The professor and his students have been successful in the areas of black-shale geology, carbonate paleo-environments and seismites, rocks that show unusual deformation related to ancient earthquakes. His approach has been to show how the formation of ancient mountain belts influenced the development of ancient seas across continents and the sediments deposited in them, using models developed in the Appalachian Basin of Kentucky and nearby states. His models are recognized around the world and have been especially useful in understanding the origin of black shales, which comprise much of the world’s gas shales, and of clastic wedges, which are large outpourings of rock debris, weathered and eroded from mountain ranges.

 

It is for Ettensohn’s contributions to the understanding of the origin of Appalachian black shales and clastic wedges, as well as for his outstanding teaching, mentorship and public outreach work, that he was elected an AAAS Fellow.

 

Regarding the incredible honor Ettensohn said, “It’s always nice to know that an organization like AAAS, which is the world’s largest general scientific society, finds merit in the teaching, outreach and research that have been a part of my career here at UK. Especially pleasing was the fact that they found my research at the university to be of such significance and quality that I was deserving of fellowship.”

 

Ettensohn also currently serves as president of the UK chapter of the honor society Phi Kappa Phi and of the Geological Society of Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UK Researcher to Focus on Improving Diets of Teens

Mon, 03/07/2016 - 16:45

LEXINGTON, Ky., (March 8, 2016) — The teenage years are a time when many individuals develop habits, both good and bad. A University of Kentucky researcher is beginning a project to try to improve the eating habits of teens.

 

With a grant funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Alison Gustafson will study the food purchasing patterns of teens in rural areas of Kentucky and North Carolina. The end result will hopefully be improved overall health and well-being of the participants.

 

“Teens purchase quite a bit of food themselves,” said Gustafson, an assistant professor in the UK Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “They also have a huge influence on the foods that their parents purchase.”

 

According to the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 18 percent of Kentucky high schoolers and 12.5 percent of high school students in North Carolina were obese in 2013.

 

In the four-year study, Gustafson will work with 14- and 15-year-old students in Clinton, Knox, Magoffin and Greenup counties. North Carolina counties include Greene, Lenoir and Pitt.

 

“Research has shown that this age range is a critical time point when behaviors start to shift,” Gustafson said. “While the majority of the participants aren’t able to drive, they have access to a large quantity of food both at school and in their community, and they are heavily influenced by their peers.”

 

Gustafson will gather information about the availability of foods in participants’ homes, schools and communities, their shopping patterns and group of friends. She will then work with local family and consumer sciences extension agents to develop and implement a curriculum based on the teens’ social networks and environments. The curriculum will emphasize eating more fruits and vegetables, drinking more water and consuming fewer sugar-sweetened beverages. Teens will learn to choose healthier foods when out with friends, to select healthier foods based on their neighborhood, to choose food venues that offer healthier foods, and to encourage fruit and vegetable consumption at home.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Katie Pratt, 859-257-8774.

 

 

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: March 8, 1912

Mon, 03/07/2016 - 13:31

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 8, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 181st diary entry from March 8, 1912, recalls McClure and her two friends going to see a movie and visiting the ice cream shop Hughes and Co., while passing time waiting to pick up her aunt from the train station.

 

March 8th. Go to train to meet Aunt Georgie and as she doesn't come we (Elizabeth, Miss Bush, and I) go to the picture show and Hughes. The next train is late, so we leave William to meet her. He brings me a lot of "eats" later on, which are indeed highly acceptable.

 

 

More on Virginia Clay McClure

 

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

 

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

 

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

 

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

 

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

 

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

 

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

 

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Coalition Encourages Healthy Eating, Supports Local Farms

Mon, 03/07/2016 - 12:18

LEXINGTON, Ky., (March 8, 2016) — A successful coalition in Madison, Wisconsin, has sparked the interest of a group of local food advocates in Lexington, so much so that they started a similar pilot project at the University of Kentucky. The program mixes employee wellness with community supported agriculture (CSA) — a true town and gown initiative that stands to benefit a great number of people, its advocates believe.

 

Tim Woods, UK agricultural economics professor, returned enthused from a trip to Madison where he explored the success of the FairShare Community Supported Agriculture Coalition. For the past 20 years, FairShare has used a voucher system to link consumers with local farmers who produce a bounty of fresh, nutritious food. A wide number of organizations, including the University of Wisconsin, distribute the vouchers to their employees.

 

“This past year, they (FairShare) offered 9,300 vouchers to employees across Madison,” Woods said. “That’s in the area of $6 million in revenue to those CSA farms just in the Madison area.”

 

Woods believes a program like this in central Kentucky could be a huge benefit for local farmers who are considering offering CSAs, as well as consumers who are looking at making healthier food choices.

 

“We find so few kinds of interventions that will really encourage such a broad base of change in diet, change in lifestyle, change in focus on nutrition,” he said. “Joining a CSA really seems to pull lots and lots of levers.”

 

So Woods and College of Agriculture, Food and Environment colleagues Alison Davis, Jairus Rossi and James Allen approached the folks in UK’s Health and Wellness program to partner on a study in 2015. Funded by a U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Market Promotion grant, Health and Wellness recruited 90 UK employees to enroll in an organic CSA program. The UKAg researchers conducted an evaluation test and control study, preliminary results of which show interesting trends.

 

There was a definite shift among participants toward preparing whole food versus processed, and more folks ate at home than they did before enrolling in a CSA. There was also an increase in the daily average fruit and vegetable consumption.

 

Interestingly, Woods said, participants’ most common reasons for joining a CSA were not health-related. Instead, people joined to gain access to better quality food, to support farms and farmers and to help their families eat better. Yet at the end of the study, CSA shareholders reported better health outcomes in such areas as annual doctor visits, monthly pharmacy expenditures, and perceived health.

 

That’s what appeals to UK Health and Wellness manager Jody Ensman.

 

“Our mission statement is to improve the health and well-being of the UK community that we serve,” she said. “We try to do that through education, empowerment and providing resources to become healthier, so this just fit right in line.”

 

Building on the findings of the research study, the pilot program will continue through the 2016 growing season, with a slightly expanded participation, with Health and Wellness providing $200 vouchers to participants.

 

Vanessa Oliver, a dietician with Health and Wellness, said this program has the ability to change how people eat.

 

“Historically, people in the U.S. don’t eat enough produce in general, specifically vegetables,” she said. “But now they have this box (from a CSA) that they pick up weekly, and they have to use these vegetables. They’ve paid for it, and it’s sitting in the kitchen; they don’t want it to go to waste.”

 

Oliver provides the education to help people break through their comfort barriers. With a meet-and-greet between future share owners and farmers to help participants choose a share that’s best for them and then through cooking demonstrations, videos and Kentucky Proud recipes, she battles the nervousness that many people experience when faced with unfamiliar food.

 

Education is not just for the consumer. Woods said a big part of the program will be to educate farmers on how to do a CSA, which he said is much more difficult than selling at a farmers market.

 

The College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, with its own organic CSA at the Horticulture Research Farm, already has experience in the field, laying a strong foundation for educational programming for producers who want to learn how to manage a CSA program.

 

“This program could create some really great opportunities for our local producers,” Woods said. “My own view of it is this CSA voucher thing has as much opportunity to invigorate the local food system as almost anything.”

 

Mac Stone, chair of the Organic Association of Kentucky and also a member of the family that owns and operates Elmwood Stock Farm, which has offered a CSA for 13 years, said that nationally, the CSA business model has about a 50 or 60 percent renewal rate.

 

“This (voucher program) is a very useful tool to help CSA farms gain and retain membership,” Stone said. “If it’s easier for farms to get their members, it also increases the conversation about healthy eating and how to cook healthy foods with a new subset of the population — people who weren’t farmers market customers or foodies to begin with.”

 

The Organic Association of Kentucky became involved to support farmers in their transition to organic production methods.

 

“If we’re going to meet this kind of demand, we need more farmers, so the farm community is going to have to step up in order to keep up, if the wellness programs see the benefits that we think they’re going to see,” Stone said.

 

The farms for the second year of the pilot program include the UK CSA Program, Elmwood Stock Farm, Sustainable Harvest Farm, Lazy 8 Stock Farm and Rootbound Farm.

 

The UK pilot voucher program is the first step in what could be a larger program that benefits employees in other companies, as well as more farmers in the wider Bluegrass region. All of this takes coordination, however, so Bluegrass Harvest was formed. Part of the Bluegrass Local Food Initiatives of Community Ventures, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide people with opportunities they might not normally have, Bluegrass Harvest was designed with the FairShare Coalition template in mind.

 

“In Madison, Wisconsin, they had a handful of farmers and 275 shares the first year, and now they have 57 organic farmers and 9,300 shares,” said Sandy Canon, president of Bluegrass Local Food Initiatives. “The potential for growth is extraordinary. The potential for stabilizing farmer income is extraordinary, and the opportunity to increase health outcomes for the good is extraordinary.”

 

Already, wellness programs in other companies have contacted Canon to see about starting a voucher program for their employees.

 

“I am really jazzed about it. There are just no down sides,” she said.

 

As the data for UKAg’s CSA study is analyzed, results will be posted online at www.uky.edu/ccd/csa-research. For more information about Bluegrass Harvest, visit their website, www.BluegrassHarvest.org.

 

 

UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uky4ky #seeblue

 

 

MEDIA CONTACT:  Carol Lea Spence, 859-257-8324.

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